ARTBOOK LOGO

ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 6/1/2017

It's the time of the season for loving... Summer of Love Booklist

DATE 5/27/2017

Women in Trees

DATE 5/25/2017

The drop-deadpan landscape photographs of Gohlke and Sternfeld

DATE 5/25/2017

Join ARTBOOK | D.A.P. at Book Expo 2017!

DATE 5/24/2017

Quietly inspiring photographs of Queens, New York, by two American masters

DATE 5/23/2017

Read Georges Bataille with Glenn A. Elmer Griffin at ARTBOOK @ Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles

DATE 5/23/2017

Can a robot be neurotic, helpless or needy? Hello, Robot!

DATE 5/22/2017

How do you feel about objects having feelings? Hello, Robot!

DATE 5/21/2017

Celebrate one of the most fearlessly experimental artists of all time

DATE 5/20/2017

Swiss Institute Launches 'The Exhibitionist'

DATE 5/20/2017

No guarantee of enlightenment, humor, beauty or art: Robert Rauschenberg

DATE 5/19/2017

Almost impossibly rich and rewarding: Robert Rauschenberg opens at MoMA

DATE 5/19/2017

Jeremy Sigler 'My Vibe' Book Launch at Spoonbill & Sugartown

DATE 5/18/2017

Where did hippie design come from? Look to the East!

DATE 5/17/2017

Who knew we needed a book about the hippie houseboat community of Sausalito?

DATE 5/16/2017

Peter Halley: Boats Crosses Trees Figures 1977–78

DATE 5/15/2017

An epic, sweeping tale: Nancy Borowick: The Family Imprint'

DATE 5/14/2017

A Daughter's Portrait of Love and Loss: Nancy Borowick's 'Family Imprint'

DATE 5/13/2017

NEW! The first major monograph on Katherine Bernhardt

DATE 5/12/2017

Save up to 85% at our L.A. Sample Sale!

DATE 5/12/2017

Automata: the epic tale of the automaton from ancient times to present day

DATE 5/11/2017

Larry Fink's Rediscovered Warhol Photos

DATE 5/10/2017

Mark Segal's Cheetah Odyssey

DATE 5/9/2017

Mothers Day - It's Complicated

DATE 5/9/2017

Oh Mamí! Mothers Day Staff Picks

DATE 5/9/2017

Katherine Bernhardt Signing & Launch at Spoonbill & Sugartown

DATE 5/9/2017

Marguerita Mergentime: American Textiles, Modern Ideas

DATE 5/8/2017

Engagingly seedy and colorful: Fred Herzog's Vancouver

DATE 5/7/2017

A Lorna Simpson moment

DATE 5/6/2017

Donald Judd: Writings

DATE 5/5/2017

Visit New York's most outrageous pop-up bookstore at Frieze NY

DATE 5/5/2017

Thirty-Four Reverse Telescopes and Three Buttons. Recent artwork by Matt Connors

DATE 5/3/2017

VOTI Book Launch and Discussion at ICI Curatorial Hub

DATE 5/3/2017

Boom boxes, break dancing and the Salsa King: Jamel Shabazz's NYC Street Photographs

DATE 5/2/2017

Alice Neel, essayist of the canvas

DATE 5/1/2017

Unsentimental Wonder: Hilton Als on Alice Neel

DATE 4/30/2017

Taking on political theater, wealth disparity and commodity culture: Louise Lawler

DATE 4/29/2017

Al Taylor, painter's painter known for his sculpture

DATE 4/28/2017

Eerie and Mystifying. Deborah Remington: A Life in Drawing

DATE 4/27/2017

The iconic fashion photography of James Moore

DATE 4/26/2017

He helped define 60s style. James Moore.

DATE 4/26/2017

James Moore: Photographs 1962-2006

DATE 4/25/2017

Sophie Calle's exquisite tribute to her mother, Rachel Monique

DATE 4/24/2017

Sophie Calle as Spie: Suite Vénitienne

DATE 4/23/2017

Sophie Calle: Double Game, a 'delightfully meta project'

DATE 4/22/2017

Sophie Calle Short List: The Address Book

DATE 4/21/2017

Quiet Sublime: Toba Khedoori

DATE 4/20/2017

Langdon Clay's Parade of Parked Cars in NY in the Magic Years 1974-1976

DATE 4/19/2017

New Topographics essential: the first comprehensive retrospective since Lewis Baltz's death in 2014

DATE 4/19/2017

In Memoriam: Barkley L. Hendricks, 1945-2017

DATE 4/19/2017

Sophie Calle Signing at 192 Books


EXCERPTS & ESSAYS

SHARON HELGASON GALLAGHER | DATE 10/7/2010

The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Publication

Following is the first portion of ARTBOOK and D.A.P. Executive Director Sharon Helgason Gallagher's talk, "The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Publication," delivered at The Frankfurt Book Fair on October 5, 2010.


Sharon Helgason Gallagher: The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Publication

"Captions have become obligatory," wrote Walter Benjamin in his now classic 1936 essay, The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, continuing "… [a]nd it is clear that they have an altogether different character than the title of a painting." For Benjamin, the title of a work of art belongs in a sense to the earlier, decaying age of the aura, when the work of art was an object of contemplation to be seen at a distance. With mechanical reproduction, for example of photographs in the picture press, the image is brought "closer" to the viewer, Benjamin tells us; it becomes local to him, living on his same plane of action rather than pointing to a beyond. The viewer is less passive in the age of mechanical reproduction: as Benjamin explains, "in permitting the reproduction to meet the beholder or listener in his own particular situation, it reactivates the object reproduced. These two processes lead to a tremendous shattering of tradition."

The same shift applies to the sphere of the word - where Benjamin uncannily presages the blog and the twittered tweet: "With the increasing extension of the press… an increasing number of readers became writers – at first, occasional ones. It began with the daily press opening to its readers space for “letters to the editor.” And today there is hardly a gainfully employed European who could not, in principle, find an opportunity to publish somewhere or other comments on his work, grievances, documentary reports, or that sort of thing. Thus, the distinction between author and public is about to lose its basic character. The difference becomes merely functional; it may vary from case to case. At any moment the reader is ready to turn into a writer."

And what of the image in the digital age? I suggest that what we find in the digital space is the increasing iconization of the image. The trajectory that Benjamin identified in mechanical reproduction has only accelerated, so that now the image is not just closer to the viewer, as it was in the picture press; the image has become so close now that the viewer can reach out and touch it. The image in the age of digital reproduction is certainly no longer something to contemplate at a distance, but it is no longer even simple evidence of an event that took place in the real world, as in Benjamin's 1930s picture press. The image is even closer to us now. It is tangible. You can click it. You do click it.

In digital space, you can barely stop yourself: you are driven to click the image. It is an icon. If western art took centuries to move away from the kissable icon to the modern work of art, the image has now come full spiral back, as it were, to the clickable digital icon. Contemplation? No longer an option. Evidence? We no longer trust it anyway in the era of digital manipulation. As reader becomes writer, so viewer becomes manipulator. In the language of the digital space – its lingua franca – the image, perceived as an icon, has become a call to action on the part of the user to… to what? To go somewhere else in the space.
So, how today can we digitally publish texts that are about images? How do we keep people in the same space with the image for long enough that they can see the image and read the text before clicking away?

Sharon Helgason Gallagher: The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Publication
Sharon Helgason Gallagher: The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Publication
Sharon Helgason Gallagher: The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Publication
Sharon Helgason Gallagher: The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Publication
Sharon Helgason Gallagher: The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Publication
Sharon Helgason Gallagher: The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Publication
Sharon Helgason Gallagher: The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Publication

Sharon Helgason Gallagher: The Work of Art in the Age of Digital PublicationSharon Helgason Gallagher is the President and Executive Director of ARTBOOK and of D.A.P./Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. in New York, a publishing and distribution company she co-founded in 1990. D.A.P.'s museum publishing clients include the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim, The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Walker Art Center. Sharon is a graduate of Yale University, summa cum laude, and holds a Masters degree in Philosophy from Columbia where she was a University Fellow.

Benjamin's Blind Spot
Benjamin's Blind Spot

Designer's Handshake

DATE: 9/1/2009



ARTBOOK LOGO
 
 

the art world's source for books on art & culture

  

CUSTOMER SERVICE
orders@artbook.com
212 627 1999
M-F 9-5 EST

TRADE ACCOUNTS

800 338 2665

CONTACT

JOBS + INTERNSHIPS

NEW YORK
Showroom by Appointment Only
75 Broad Street, Suite 630
New York NY 10004
Tel   212 627 1999

LOS ANGELES
Showroom by Appointment Only
818 S. Broadway, Suite 700
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Tel. 323 969 8985

ARTBOOK LLC
D.A.P. | Distributed Art Publishers, Inc.


All site content Copyright C 2000-2017 by Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. and the respective publishers, authors, artists. For reproduction permissions, contact the copyright holders.

ARTBOOK AMPERSAT

The D.A.P. Catalog
www.artbook.com