ARTBOOK LOGO

ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 12/20/2018

Source Photographic Review names 'Evidence' one of the 10 Greatest Photo Books of All Time

DATE 2/24/2017

Valérie Belin Book Launch at Albertine

DATE 1/19/2017

Mark Peterson: Political Theatre

DATE 1/18/2017

Lee Lozano: Lozano c. 1962

DATE 1/17/2017

Lee Lozano: Lozano c. 1962

DATE 1/17/2017

Lee Lozano: Private Book 1

DATE 1/16/2017

Martin Luther King, Jr., Washington, D.C., 1963

DATE 1/15/2017

Gordon Parks: I Am You

DATE 1/14/2017

Kerry James Marshall: Look See, Untitled (Rapunzel)

DATE 1/13/2017

Betye Saar: Uneasy Dancer

DATE 1/12/2017

Paris Metro Photo

DATE 1/11/2017

Paris Metro Photo

DATE 1/10/2017

Paris Metro Photo, Kertész

DATE 1/10/2017

TONIGHT! City Lights Launches 'Shakespeare and Company, Paris'

DATE 1/9/2017

Louis Faurer

DATE 1/8/2017

Constant: New Babylon. To Us, Liberty

DATE 1/7/2017

Constant: Space + Colour

DATE 1/6/2017

Henry Wessel: Traffic/Sunset Park/Continental Divide

DATE 1/5/2017

Kandinsky, Marc, and Der Blaue Reiter

DATE 1/4/2017

Gordon Parks: I Am You

DATE 1/3/2017

See Red Women's Workshop: Feminist Posters 1974–1990

DATE 1/2/2017

See Red Women's Workshop

DATE 1/1/2017

Curtis Moffat: Silver Society, Experimental Photography and Design, 1923-1935

DATE 12/31/2016

Nan Goldin: Diving for Pearls, Self-portrait on New Year's Eve

DATE 12/30/2016

Frank Stella: Prints, A Catalogue Raisonné, Marriage of Reason and Squalor

DATE 12/29/2016

William Eggleston: The Democratic Forest

DATE 12/28/2016

Shakespeare and Company, Paris: A History of the Rag & Bone Shop of the Heart

DATE 12/27/2016

Anthony Hernandez, Los Angeles #2

DATE 12/26/2016

Georgia O'Keeffe: Watercolors, Mountain painting No. 22 - Special

DATE 12/25/2016

Ernst Haas: Color Correction, 1952–1986

DATE 12/24/2016

Alexander Girard: A Designer's Universe

DATE 12/23/2016

George Shiras: In the Heart of the Dark Night, three deer escaping

DATE 12/22/2016

Fred Mortagne: Attraper au vol

DATE 12/21/2016

The Little Mermaid by Hans Christian Andersen & Yayoi Kusama

DATE 12/20/2016

Provoke: Between Protest and Performance, Photography in Japan 1960–1975

DATE 12/19/2016

Jean-Michel Basquiat: Words Are All We Have

DATE 12/17/2016

The Wirtz Private Garden

DATE 12/16/2016

Paul Gauguin: Ramblings of a Wannabe Painter

DATE 12/16/2016

Carol Bove: Polka Dots

DATE 12/15/2016

Yves Klein: In/Out Studio

DATE 12/14/2016

Never Built New York at Center for Architecture

DATE 12/14/2016

Never Built New York, Coney Island Globe

DATE 12/13/2016

The Anatomical Venus: Wax, God, Death & the Ecstatic

DATE 12/12/2016

Toilet Paper: Calendar 2017

DATE 12/11/2016

Della Robbia: Sculpting with Color in Renaissance Florence

DATE 12/10/2016

Berenice Abbott: Paris Portraits 1925–1930, Violette Murat

DATE 12/9/2016

Ed Panar: Animals That Saw Me, Volume Two

DATE 12/9/2016

Peter Hujar: Lost Downtown, Candy Darling

DATE 12/9/2016

Janet Sternburg Talk and Signing at Hauser Wirth & Schimmel

DATE 12/7/2016

Robert Rauschenberg

DATE 12/7/2016

Michael Fried & James Welling Launch 'Promesse du Bonheur' at 192 Books


EVENTS

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/17/2017

Lee Lozano: Private Book 1

In the 1960's, Lee Lozano was living and working in New York, painting her own kind of heavy, bodily, manic work – rather than conforming to the then-dominant modes of Abstract Expressionism and Pop – and garnering the recognition of the art world corpus of galleries, museums and magazines. Simultaneously, she initiated a body of aesthetically opposite conceptual artworks called Language Pieces--scribbled, mostly instructional or task-oriented notes generally written in ink on standard 8 1/2 x 11 paper. Lozano considered these works "'drawings,' eliminating any distinction between them and her more traditional studio practice," according to Helen Molesworth's excellent text in Karma's illuminating new monograph, Lozano c. 1962. And yet, except for the fact that they were singled out as art objects, the Language Pieces are nearly identical to the journal pages that Lozano penned around the same time.

Lee Lozano: Private Book 1

Nearly 50 years later, for our reading pleasure and general delight, Karma has reproduced the first of Lozano's journals in a wonderful pocket-sized facsimile edition. If one was to stumble upon this 3x5-inch, spiral-bound notebook on the street, it would be hard not to assume it was someone's lost, secret diary, as the varying weight of Lozano's pen on the page and her energetic scribbles and little drawings are all rendered exquisitely.

Lee Lozano: Private Book 1

Whether one knows Lozano's work or not, there is an immense, inevitable joy to flipping through this tiny, very private-feeling volume packed to the brim with ideas for paintings, random inventions, phone numbers and addresses, meetings times and people's names, thoughts, manifestos, scientific inquiries, dreams, and, if you can believe it, much more. Through her unfiltered thoughts and idiosyncratic vocabularies, we are able to experience the inner-Lozano as a true force of nature, impossible to contain within a single mode of expression.

Lee Lozano: Private Book 1

Unlike the Language Pieces, Lozano's Private Book 1 was not created to be a commodity, a unit of exchange to be used within the existing system of art and culture. Perhaps one of the most fascinating threads in the book is the beginnings of her now famous rejection of the art world, which manifested itself in a move from New York to Dallas in 1971 and the eventual decision to "boycott women."

Lee Lozano: Private Book 1

This particular notebook chronicles the years 1968-1969, when the seeds for this conscious reinvention are already beginning to take root. On April 7, 1968, Lozano summarizes an Artforum article: "Another concept of paint is its being matter in solid state. A painter who thinks of it this way is Lee Lozano, whose bowels function magnificently." In her classically irreverent and humorous manner, Lozano negates the art critic's attempt to classify her not only as "artist," but also as "artist who paints in x manner." She goes on to write, "Any kind of art can utilize materials in any state of matter, energy too." In slipping out of our hands, in denying us ownership over her art and her identity, Lozano remains even today a fascinating chase. Just as she considered the Language Pieces to be works of art on par with her paintings, so, too, we must consider her private journal to be the same, a shifting, effervescent portrait of the artist.

Lee Lozano: Private Book 1

Whether Lozano would have been happy with the publication of her private notebook feels like the wrong question to ask of Private Book 1. The deed is done. Accept this gift and take it wherever you go.

Lee Lozano: Private Book 1
Lee Lozano: Private Book 1
Lee Lozano: Private Book 1

Lee Lozano: Private Book 1

Lee Lozano: Private Book 1

KARMA, NEW YORK
Pbk, 3 x 5 in. / 136 pgs.

$18.00  free shipping

DATE 8/23/2015

Xanti Schawinsky

Xanti Schawinsky

DATE 7/31/2015

Axel Hoedt

Axel Hoedt

DATE 9/11/2014

New York Is ...

New York Is ...

DATE 5/13/2014

Libuse Niklová

Libuse Niklová


ARTBOOK LOGO
 
 

the art world's source for books on art & culture

  

CUSTOMER SERVICE
orders@artbook.com
212 627 1999
M-F 9-5 EST

TRADE ACCOUNTS

800 338 2665

CONTACT

JOBS + INTERNSHIPS

NEW YORK
Showroom by Appointment Only
155 Sixth Avenue
New York NY 10013
Tel   212 627 1999

LOS ANGELES
Showroom by Appointment Only
818 S. Broadway, Suite 700
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Tel. 323 969 8985

ARTBOOK LLC
D.A.P. | Distributed Art Publishers, Inc.


All site content Copyright C 2000-2013 by Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. and the respective publishers, authors, artists. For reproduction permissions, contact the copyright holders.

ARTBOOK AMPERSAT

The D.A.P. Catalog
www.artbook.com