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RECENT POSTS

DATE 7/28/2015

The Oasis of Matisse

DATE 7/26/2015

Thomas Campbell: Seeing Fatima's Eyes

DATE 7/25/2015

Robert Seydel: A Picture Is Always a Book

DATE 7/24/2015

Modern Taste

DATE 7/23/2015

Modern Taste

DATE 7/22/2015

ARTBOOK @ Swiss Institute Presents Semiotext(e)

DATE 7/22/2015

Modern Taste: Art Deco in Paris 1910-1935

DATE 7/21/2015

Back in Stock! Where Children Sleep

DATE 7/21/2015

Modern Taste

DATE 7/20/2015

High Design

DATE 7/20/2015

Modern Taste: Art Deco in Paris 1910-1935

DATE 7/19/2015

This Week: Visit David Zwirner Books' Pop-Up Store

DATE 7/19/2015

An Uncommon Archive

DATE 7/18/2015

An Uncommon Archive

DATE 7/17/2015

Agnes Martin: Who's Afraid of Triangles?

DATE 7/17/2015

Robert Seydel: The Eye in Matter at Queens Museum

DATE 7/16/2015

Agnes Martin

DATE 7/16/2015

'Joni Sternbach: Surf Site Tin Type' Book Launch

DATE 7/15/2015

Agnes Martin

DATE 7/14/2015

Agnes Martin Excerpt: "Beauty Is the Mystery of Life"

DATE 7/14/2015

Agnes Martin: "Untitled" (2002)

DATE 7/13/2015

Frances Morris and Tiffany Bell on Agnes Martin

DATE 7/13/2015

Agnes Martin: "Gratitude" (2001)

DATE 7/13/2015

Squares!

DATE 7/12/2015

Sally Mann: Immediate Family

DATE 7/12/2015

Daniel King: Ukraine Youth Book Launch

DATE 7/11/2015

Sally Mann: Immediate Family

DATE 7/11/2015

Photobook Classics

DATE 7/10/2015

Sally Mann: Immediate Family

DATE 7/9/2015

Joseph Szabo: Rolling Stones Fans

DATE 7/9/2015

The Future of the Skyscraper by SOM

DATE 7/8/2015

Art Green: "Disclosing Enclosure" (1968)

DATE 7/8/2015

What Nerve! at Matthew Marks

DATE 7/7/2015

Matthew Marks Book Launch: The Collected Hairy Who Publications 1966-69

DATE 7/7/2015

What Nerve!

DATE 7/6/2015

The Strand Presents Joseph Szabo & Vince Aletti on 'Rolling Stones Fans'

DATE 7/6/2015

Jim Nutt: "Her Face Fits" (1968)

DATE 7/4/2015

The Open Road

DATE 7/3/2015

What Nerve!

DATE 7/1/2015

Gordon Parks: A Harlem Family

DATE 6/29/2015

No Problem

DATE 6/29/2015

Gillian Laub: Southern Rites

DATE 6/29/2015

Jacob Lawrence: The Migration Series, Panel 14 ("injustice in the courts"), 1941

DATE 6/29/2015

Black and White

DATE 6/28/2015

Kissing Cousins: 'No Problem: Cologne/New York 1984-1989'

DATE 6/27/2015

Ed Templeton: "Girls in Traditional Mexican Dresses, Olvera Street" (2004)

DATE 6/27/2015

Thomas Campbell: Seeing Fatima's Eyes

DATE 6/26/2015

Raymond Pettibon: Surfers 1985-2015

DATE 6/26/2015

Both Sides of Sunset Launch & Panel at MOCA LA

DATE 6/26/2015

Sarah Charlesworth: "Carnival Ball" (2012)

DATE 6/26/2015

The Photographs of Abraham Lincoln


RECENT POSTS

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/28/2015

The Oasis of Matisse

"The successive flights of doves, their orbits, their curves glide into me as if in a great interior space. You cannot imagine how much, in this period of paper cutouts, this sensation of flight that comes over me helps me better to adjust my hand as it guides the path of my scissors. It is quite difficult to explain. I would say it is a sort of graphic, linear equivalent of the sensation of flight. There is also the issue of vibrating space. To give life to a brushstroke, a line, to make a form exist, that is not something achieved in conventional academies, but beyond, in nature, in the penetrating observation of the things that surround us. A tiny detail can show us a grand mechanism, an essential cog of life." White Alga on Red and Green Background (1947) and the above quotation from a conversation between Matisse and writer André Verdet, are reproduced from Koenig Books' new release The Oasis of Matisse, published to accompany the exhibition currently on view at the Stedelijk Museum.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/26/2015

Thomas Campbell: Seeing Fatima's Eyes

Thomas Campbell's 2011 photograph, captioned "Craig Anderson laying shit down, round house. Boilers, Central Morocco," is reproduced from Campbell's vivid new collection, Seeing Fatima's Eyes: Surf, Life, Stuff, Morocco, North Africa. "I like the relatedness for the common person to look at an image, and feel it, and be like 'Whoa, that looks super fun.' Instead of including the more critical, like, magazine-style photos. I just wanted to relay a vibe and create a feeling of enjoyment and depth of experience."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/25/2015

Robert Seydel: A Picture Is Always a Book

Featured image is "journal page" from Robert Seydel: A Picture is Always a Book, Siglio's follow-up to 2011's highly-coveted Book of Ruth and the accompanying publication to the Seydel show currently on view at the Queens Museum. In an interview, contributor Savina Velkova asks Seydel (1960–2011) about the productive function of Ruth Greisman, his alter ego and the "author" of the journal pages. His response: "Well, I love artists who contain a mixed pedigree, or who are contaminated in some way, who contain contradictory impulses. And I’m particularly drawn to an image of the artist as non-professional or anti-professional, outside the sphere of trade and the economies of art and product, which is a word I hate as applied to art. Ruth kind of begins in that place—she says, for instance, 'The galleries are made for fashion. Nothing I make is.'" Continue to our blog to read about related events this weekend at the Queens Museum!

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/24/2015

Modern Taste

This 1919 portrait of Denise Poiret in a silver evening gown designed by her husband, French couturier Paul Poiret, is reproduced from Modern Taste: Art Deco in Paris 1910-1935, published by Fondacion Juan March. Art Historian Tim Benton writes, "In many ways, Art Deco is a style conceived and largely consumed by and for women. The great couturiers of the 19th century had established Paris as the center of world fashion and their 20th century followers fought tooth and nail to maintain this dominance. And it was the couturiers who were not only the first patrons of Art Deco but also the ones who gave it its characteristic panache. Before the war, it was Poiret who made dramatic changes in the way fashion was conceived and marketed and in so doing changed the shape of the fashionable woman. Freeing the body from the corset and heavy underwear, Poiret idealized an image of the young, slender body… This kind of figure crops up repeatedly in the sculpture of the period."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/23/2015

Modern Taste

Featured image is a detail from a design for a silver cigarette case by Jean Fouquet, circa 1925. It is reproduced from Modern Taste: Art Deco in Paris 1910-1935, published by Fondacion Juan March. Evelyne Possémé, chief curator of Art Nouveau and Art Deco jewelry at the Museum of Decorative Arts, Paris, quotes one critic's response to Fouquet's designs based on machine and automobile parts: "It gives me the shudders. Are women supposed to wear ball bearings on their arms? Really, I object [...] yes, machines are wonderful, powerful things, and that’s what I like about them; but I am not keen on seeing their insides displayed at inopportune moments. Pieces of jewelry that look like spare parts make for very crude symbols. We do not need fetishism. We are not commemorating the victory of the machine; we do not have to sport miniature engines. Messrs Fouquet and Templier really should look elsewhere for their inspiration."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/22/2015

ARTBOOK @ Swiss Institute Presents Semiotext(e)

Visit ARTBOOK @ SWISS INSTITUTE to browse new, classic and hard-to-find titles from Semiotext(e), influential publisher of French theory and other writings by radical international thinkers. Our summer pop-up is open Wednesday - Sunday through mid-August.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/22/2015

Modern Taste: Art Deco in Paris 1910-1935

Jean Carlu's 1931 poster for the Exposition Union des Artistes Modernes is reproduced from Modern Taste, Fondacion Juan March's impeccable new survey of Art Deco art, architecture, design, film and advertising in Paris, 1910-1935. Of the dissident group, which included Sonia Delaunay, Jean Prouvé, Jean Fouquet, Eileen Grey and others, the editors write, "The Societé des Artistes Decorateurs (SAD) had always been able to absorb divergences of viewpoint, but… the threat posed by the Modern Movement in Germany, Holland and France and the political stance of many of the members meant that by 1929 it had become intolerable to many designers to continue to represent themselves as 'decorators' serving the interest of wealthy individual clients. The journalist Ernest Tisserand had detected a 'whiff of secession' as early as 1926, writing in that year that he expected to see a salon of independent Decorative Artists in the following year. Sure enough, in 1929 a group of designers decided to split off from the SAD and established a new organization, the Union des Artistes Modernes (UAM). The words 'artist' and 'modern' were clearly significant, claiming both a higher status than that of 'decorative artists' and fixing their colors to the mast of modernity."

KOLLEEN KU | DATE 7/21/2015

Back in Stock! Where Children Sleep

Last week, we rereleased "Where Children Sleep," James Mollison's fascinating exploration of children's bedrooms, upbringings and livelihoods from around the world. An instant hit when first published in 2010, it is now in its fifth printing.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/21/2015

Modern Taste

Jean Dupas' poster for the XVème Salon des Artistes Décorateurs, 1924, is reproduced from Modern Taste: Art Deco in Paris 1910-1935. In his chapter, Art Deco: Style and Meaning, Tim Benton writes, "This was the Zeitgeist premise: architecture and design should change radically because the world had been dramatically altered by the arrival of industrialization. Modernist architects and designers all over Europe invariably made use of this argument. But there was a counter-argument: that the horrors of the modern world required that artists separate themselves from contingency and create an autonomous, disinterested work which allowed them to achieve an elevated spiritual satisfaction… This argument is the epistemological issue of the relationship between the material world and the realm of the imagination, or between body and spirit. Does the one determine the other? Most people would have reservations about this. Curiously, many supporters of Art Deco deployed this argument in favor of decorative art."

DATE 7/14/2015

Agnes Martin Excerpt: "Beauty Is the Mystery of Life"

Agnes Martin Excerpt: "Beauty Is the Mystery of Life"

Agnes Martin's 1989 essay is reproduced from our essential new monograph, published to accompany the critically-acclaimed touring retrospective currently on view at Tate Modern. Patricia Albers makes special note of this text in the "New York Times Book Review" this weekend, asserting that it is "not to be missed."

DATE 6/15/2015

The Future of the Skyscraper

The Future of the Skyscraper

Last week, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and Metropolis Books launched the SOM THINKERS series with 'The Future of the Skyscraper,' featuring texts by Bruce Sterling, Tom Vanderbilt, Matthew Yglesias, Diana Lind, Will Self, Emily Badger, Dickson Despommier and Philip Nobel, whose Introduction is excerpted here.

DATE 2/22/2015

On the Small and the Contrary

On the Small and the Contrary

Lisa Pearson of Siglio writes on publishing as "An act of resistance to the literal, the authoritarian and the facile... and as a testament to the 'book' as refuge, dissent, beacon, and nexus."

DATE 3/5/2013

Imagining the Future Art Book
Sharon Helgason Gallagher

Future of the Art Book

"Paging through a book is like closing a door behind you that simultaneously opens another onto a new room -- all the while keeping the previous room available, just behind the now-closed door of the turned page. Here I am in the hallway of the introduction..." -- excerpt from Sharon Helgason Gallagher's remarks at the New York Public Library panel discussion The Future of the Art Book

DATE 9/27/2012

What Shall We Want to Have Called a "Book"?
Sharon Helgason Gallagher

What Shall We Want to Have Called a "Book"?

What are the kinds of books we ought to be publishing today as exemplars of the book for the future? What is the enduring legacy of "bookishness" that we want to -- may I say "ought to" -- transmit to the future? What kinds of meaning are and can be transmitted uniquely in the book form? What is the "bookishness" of the book that does not survive conversion, translation, adaptation, or reformatting as a digital publication? And what kinds of books even posses this quality?



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