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RECENT POSTS

DATE 7/1/2015

Gordon Parks: A Harlem Family

DATE 6/29/2015

Jacob Lawrence: The Migration Series

DATE 6/29/2015

Gillian Laub: Southern Rites

DATE 6/29/2015

No Problem

DATE 6/29/2015

Black and White

DATE 6/27/2015

Agnes Martin Excerpt: "Beauty Is the Mystery of Life"

DATE 6/27/2015

Both Sides of Sunset

DATE 6/26/2015

Both Sides of Sunset Launch & Panel at MOCA LA

DATE 6/26/2015

Raymond Pettibon: Surfers 1985-2015

DATE 6/26/2015

Sarah Charlesworth: Doubleworld

DATE 6/26/2015

The Photographs of Abraham Lincoln

DATE 6/25/2015

Both Sides of Sunset - Foreword by Ed Ruscha

DATE 6/25/2015

Sarah Charlesworth: Doubleworld

DATE 6/24/2015

Visit the Hatje Cantz Pop-Up at Sean Kelly Gallery

DATE 6/24/2015

Drawing People

DATE 6/24/2015

Drawing People

DATE 6/22/2015

No Problem: Cologne/New York 1984-1989

DATE 6/22/2015

Drawing Center to Launch 'Drawing People' with Chloe Piene & Dasha Shishkin

DATE 6/22/2015

Surf's Up

DATE 6/21/2015

Victor Moscoso

DATE 6/21/2015

Ed Ruscha

DATE 6/19/2015

Both Sides of Sunset: Photographing Los Angeles

DATE 6/18/2015

Both Sides of Sunset

DATE 6/18/2015

Both Sides of Sunset: Photographing Los Angeles

DATE 6/17/2015

More Books for Dads!

DATE 6/17/2015

Shigeru Ban to Lecture at the Architectural League

DATE 6/16/2015

'Both Sides of Sunset' at Hamburg Kennedy

DATE 6/16/2015

Shigeru Ban: Humanitarian Architecture

DATE 6/15/2015

The Future of the Skyscraper

DATE 6/15/2015

Drawing People: The Human Figure in Contemporary Art

DATE 6/14/2015

Drawing People: The Human Figure in Contemporary Art

DATE 6/13/2015

Niki de Saint Phalle

DATE 6/12/2015

Niki de Saint Phalle

DATE 6/11/2015

Most Definitely Fearless

DATE 6/11/2015

Niki de Saint Phalle

DATE 6/10/2015

Latin America in Construction

DATE 6/9/2015

Henry Leutwyler: Ballet

DATE 6/8/2015

Wim Wenders: Written in the West, Revisited

DATE 6/7/2015

Wim Wenders: Written in the West, Revisited

DATE 6/6/2015

Now Available: 'Interviews by Mike Kelley' eBook Editions

DATE 6/6/2015

David Leventi: Opera

DATE 6/5/2015

Wim Wenders: Written in the West, Revisited

DATE 6/5/2015

Announcing the Fall 2015 ARTBOOK | D.A.P. Catalogue

DATE 6/5/2015

Agnes Martin

DATE 6/5/2015

Louise Bourgeois: I Have Been to Hell and Back

DATE 6/4/2015

Dennis Hopper: Drugstore Camera

DATE 6/3/2015

Dennis Hopper: Drugstore Camera

DATE 6/2/2015

Daniel King: Ukraine Youth

DATE 6/2/2015

For Dads

DATE 5/31/2015

From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires: Grete Stern and Horacio Coppola

DATE 5/29/2015

Kehinde Wiley: The World Stage: Haiti


RECENT POSTS

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/1/2015

Gordon Parks: A Harlem Family

"What I want, what I am, what you force me to be, is what you are." This headline begins a remarkable text by Gordon Parks', published alongside his cover photoessay for the March 8, 1968 issue of Life magazine, reproduced here from Steidl's 2013 Studio Museum exhibition catalog, Gordon Parks: Harlem Story. Parks continues, "For I am you, staring back from a mirror of poverty and despair, of revolt and freedom. Look at me and know that to destroy me is to destroy yourself. You are weary of the long hot summers. I am tired of the long hungered winters. We are not so far apart as it might seem. There is something about both of us that goes deeper than blood or black and white. It is our common search for a better life, a better world. I march now over the same ground you once marched. I fight for the same things you sill fight for. My children's needs are the same as your children's. I too am America. America is me. It gave me the only life I know—so I must share in its survival. Look at me. Listen to me. Try to understand my struggle against your racism. There is yet a chance for us to live in peace behind these restless skies."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/29/2015

Jacob Lawrence: The Migration Series

Panel 14 from Jacob Lawrence's 60-panel masterpiece, the Migration Series, was captioned by the artist in 1941: "Among the social conditions that existed which was partly the cause of the migration was the injustice done to the Negroes in the courts." As relevant today as it was more than half a century ago, this seminal document of racial injustice is on view through September 7 at MoMA, after which it travels to the Phillips Collection in Washington, DC. For those who cannot travel to see the show in person, the book, reviewed this weekend in the New York Times Book Review, should be required reading for every American. Reviewer Isabel Wilkerson marvels at Lawrence's ability to "so thoroughly inhabit something so large at so young an age and, through lived experience and focused devotion, become not only an artist but a documentarian, a sociologist and a historian, able to see past the midpoint of the movement into the present day. His final panel accurately predicted that the migration would continue. And his first panel, a depiction of migrants rushing toward trains destined for 'Chicago,' 'New York' and 'St. Louis,' seems prophetic in the age of Ferguson."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/29/2015

Gillian Laub: Southern Rites

In Southern Rites, photographer Gillian Laub's provocative 12-year visual study of Mount Vernon, Georgia's struggle to confront longstanding issues of race and equality, Keyke Burns is quoted on the issue of segregated proms: "Every year there’s like one mixed couple and they are always welcome at our prom. But there’s no way Siarria was allowed to take Kent to the white prom. White girls can be friends with black boys, but if they have relationship with a black guy they’ll be disowned or their car will be taken away. A girl in my grade had just gotten a new car her senior year. Her momma kept coming to my daddy because he’s the police chief, asking him to keep her away from this black dude’s house. My daddy was like, ‘Well she’s eighteen, you can’t make her come home, you can’t control who she dates, you can’t call the police on her anymore. She’s grown now.’ This girl got her car taken away and kicked out of the house. She is on her own now with no money, no car. I think that’s what scares people the most around here. They don’t want to lose all the privileges they get. I guess I don’t blame them. I want a nice car too." Featured image is of Siarria and Kent outside the black prom, 2008.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/29/2015

No Problem

"The '80s, as they flowed into the '90s, appear from our vantage as perhaps the last period in which artists, critics, and curators, the exhibitions and the writing around art, led the way and were of consequence," Bob Nickas writes in No Problem: Cologne/New York, David Zwirner Books' fresh examination of art from the polar epicenters of the late-8os art world. "Art was driven by what was gained and what was lost. There were heroes and villains. People chose sides and art served its cause, addressing the larger culture within which it coexisted, at times uneasily. Artists saw themselves implicated within an image world that was fast transforming into an industry, and art would once again have a self-critical function. You were aware that you were present in the moment, that you were part of it or wanted to be, that there was a collectively driven force. Everyone was offering each other a set of possibilities and challenges, and direction. And so those works and those shows, the writing and debate, they were guideposts that pointed to where you were heading and where you had come from." When God Created Rock, He Must Have Been Horny (Rock Music III) (1984), is by Albert Oehlen, whose work is currently on view at the New Museum.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/27/2015

Agnes Martin Excerpt: "Beauty Is the Mystery of Life"

Agnes Martin's 1989 essay is reproduced from our essential new monograph, published to accompany the critically-acclaimed touring retrospective currently on view at Tate Modern. Patricia Albers makes special note of this text in the "New York Times Book Review" this weekend, asserting that it is "not to be missed."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/27/2015

Both Sides of Sunset

"Girls in Traditional Mexican Dresses, Olvera Street" (2004) is by Ed Templeton, who will appear at MOCA Grand Street, Los Angeles, today at 3PM, in conversation with fellow Both Sides of Sunset contributors, Zoe Crosher, Bettina Hubby and Michael Shields. The panel will be moderated by the Los Angeles Times' David L. Ulin, who writes that Both Sides of Sunset "finds consistency or at least a through line, in the fragments, makes a case to frame the city a s a whole... Los Angeles requires us to peer beneath the surface, even as the surface continues to beguile. We are always zooming in and out, adjusting focus, looking for the larger story in the smaller, the smaller story in the larger, recalibrating our sense of place here, our relationship to the landscape and what it does or does not mean." Join us this afternoon to celebrate the most interesting book of Los Angeles photography in many years, followed by a signing.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/26/2015

Both Sides of Sunset Launch & Panel at MOCA LA

Join us Saturday, June 27 at 3PM for a book launch and panel in celebration of 'Both Sides of Sunset: Photographing Los Angeles!" Zoe Crosher, Bettina Hubby, Michael Shields and Ed Templeton will appear in conversation with David L. Ulin, followed by a signing.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/26/2015

Raymond Pettibon: Surfers 1985-2015

"No title (I work upstairs…)" (2011) is reproduced from Raymond Pettibon: Surfers 1985-2015, one of our favorite books for summer. In his thoroughly interesting essay, Carlo McCormick writes, "Raymond Pettibon is the veteran of many wars, few that people would have heard of, most so abstract, waged in such godforsaken corners of our cultural neglect and without the illusion of decisive victory, that they have been forgotten. Grizzled and hardened past his years, combat has also made him younger than all the rest, and deep inside the pit of our collective cynicism and rage, somehow soft with a humanism that can only be born of having seen the very worst our human condition offers. A warrior who has fought against so much and for no one in particular, who has seen all the battles as Pyrrhic victories waged for the empiric causes of doomed empires, Pettibon is an uncanny correspondent to venture out onto these last shores of a feral nature that thrashes about in its global death rattle."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/26/2015

Sarah Charlesworth: Doubleworld

In Sarah Charlesworth: Doubleworld—published to accompany the late artist's retrospective on view now at the New Museum—Hal Foster writes, "Ambiguity is everything in postmodernist art, and so it is with the work of Sarah Charlesworth: she liked to turn the received ideas of visual culture into productive paradoxes, questioning other clichés in the process, such as the notion that critical art is always didactic or obviously political." He goes on to list seven of the categories of paradox that Charlesworth put into play, including photography as a problem; subtraction as addition; aura lost and regained; the sex appeal of the inorganic; the question of whether alienation can be desired; critique through complicity; and paradox in art that "looks great and hurts a little." Featured image is "Carnival Ball" (2012).

DATE 6/27/2015

Agnes Martin Excerpt: "Beauty Is the Mystery of Life"

Agnes Martin Excerpt: "Beauty Is the Mystery of Life"

Agnes Martin's 1989 essay is reproduced from our essential new monograph, published to accompany the critically-acclaimed touring retrospective currently on view at Tate Modern. Patricia Albers makes special note of this text in the "New York Times Book Review" this weekend, asserting that it is "not to be missed."

DATE 6/15/2015

The Future of the Skyscraper

The Future of the Skyscraper

Last week, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and Metropolis Books launched the SOM THINKERS series with 'The Future of the Skyscraper,' featuring texts by Bruce Sterling, Tom Vanderbilt, Matthew Yglesias, Diana Lind, Will Self, Emily Badger, Dickson Despommier and Philip Nobel, whose Introduction is excerpted here.

DATE 2/22/2015

On the Small and the Contrary

On the Small and the Contrary

Lisa Pearson of Siglio writes on publishing as "An act of resistance to the literal, the authoritarian and the facile... and as a testament to the 'book' as refuge, dissent, beacon, and nexus."

DATE 3/5/2013

Imagining the Future Art Book
Sharon Helgason Gallagher

Future of the Art Book

"Paging through a book is like closing a door behind you that simultaneously opens another onto a new room -- all the while keeping the previous room available, just behind the now-closed door of the turned page. Here I am in the hallway of the introduction..." -- excerpt from Sharon Helgason Gallagher's remarks at the New York Public Library panel discussion The Future of the Art Book

DATE 9/27/2012

What Shall We Want to Have Called a "Book"?
Sharon Helgason Gallagher

What Shall We Want to Have Called a "Book"?

What are the kinds of books we ought to be publishing today as exemplars of the book for the future? What is the enduring legacy of "bookishness" that we want to -- may I say "ought to" -- transmit to the future? What kinds of meaning are and can be transmitted uniquely in the book form? What is the "bookishness" of the book that does not survive conversion, translation, adaptation, or reformatting as a digital publication? And what kinds of books even posses this quality?



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