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RECENT POSTS

DATE 12/20/2018

Source Photographic Review names 'Evidence' one of the 10 Greatest Photo Books of All Time

DATE 2/24/2017

Valérie Belin Book Launch at Albertine

DATE 1/24/2017

The Moon 1968–1972

DATE 1/23/2017

100 Secrets of the Art World Launch at MoMA PS1

DATE 1/23/2017

Judith Bernstein: Rising

DATE 1/22/2017

See Red Women's Workshop

DATE 1/21/2017

See Red Women's Workshop

DATE 1/20/2017

Mark Peterson: Political Theatre

DATE 1/19/2017

Mark Peterson: Political Theatre

DATE 1/18/2017

Lee Lozano: Lozano c. 1962

DATE 1/17/2017

Lee Lozano: Private Book 1

DATE 1/17/2017

Lee Lozano: Lozano c. 1962

DATE 1/16/2017

Martin Luther King, Jr., Washington, D.C., 1963

DATE 1/15/2017

Gordon Parks: I Am You

DATE 1/14/2017

Kerry James Marshall: Look See, Untitled (Rapunzel)

DATE 1/13/2017

Betye Saar: Uneasy Dancer

DATE 1/12/2017

Paris Metro Photo

DATE 1/11/2017

Paris Metro Photo

DATE 1/10/2017

TONIGHT! City Lights Launches 'Shakespeare and Company, Paris'

DATE 1/10/2017

Paris Metro Photo, Kertész

DATE 1/9/2017

Louis Faurer

DATE 1/8/2017

Constant: New Babylon. To Us, Liberty

DATE 1/7/2017

Constant: Space + Colour

DATE 1/6/2017

Henry Wessel: Traffic/Sunset Park/Continental Divide

DATE 1/5/2017

Kandinsky, Marc, and Der Blaue Reiter

DATE 1/4/2017

Gordon Parks: I Am You

DATE 1/3/2017

See Red Women's Workshop: Feminist Posters 1974–1990

DATE 1/2/2017

See Red Women's Workshop

DATE 1/1/2017

Curtis Moffat: Silver Society, Experimental Photography and Design, 1923-1935

DATE 12/31/2016

Nan Goldin: Diving for Pearls, Self-portrait on New Year's Eve

DATE 12/30/2016

Frank Stella: Prints, A Catalogue Raisonné, Marriage of Reason and Squalor

DATE 12/29/2016

William Eggleston: The Democratic Forest

DATE 12/28/2016

Shakespeare and Company, Paris: A History of the Rag & Bone Shop of the Heart

DATE 12/27/2016

Anthony Hernandez, Los Angeles #2

DATE 12/26/2016

Georgia O'Keeffe: Watercolors, Mountain painting No. 22 - Special

DATE 12/25/2016

Ernst Haas: Color Correction, 1952–1986

DATE 12/24/2016

Alexander Girard: A Designer's Universe

DATE 12/23/2016

George Shiras: In the Heart of the Dark Night, three deer escaping

DATE 12/22/2016

Fred Mortagne: Attraper au vol

DATE 12/21/2016

The Little Mermaid by Hans Christian Andersen & Yayoi Kusama

DATE 12/20/2016

Provoke: Between Protest and Performance, Photography in Japan 1960–1975

DATE 12/19/2016

Jean-Michel Basquiat: Words Are All We Have

DATE 12/17/2016

The Wirtz Private Garden

DATE 12/16/2016

Carol Bove: Polka Dots

DATE 12/16/2016

Paul Gauguin: Ramblings of a Wannabe Painter

DATE 12/15/2016

Yves Klein: In/Out Studio

DATE 12/14/2016

Never Built New York at Center for Architecture

DATE 12/14/2016

Never Built New York, Coney Island Globe

DATE 12/13/2016

The Anatomical Venus: Wax, God, Death & the Ecstatic

DATE 12/12/2016

Toilet Paper: Calendar 2017

DATE 12/11/2016

Della Robbia: Sculpting with Color in Renaissance Florence


RECENT POSTS

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 12/20/2018

Source Photographic Review names 'Evidence' one of the 10 Greatest Photo Books of All Time

We are very proud to have published the 2004 edition of 'Evidence,' the seminal conceptual photobook first published by Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel in 1977. We are honored that 'Source Photographic Review' has named the book one of the most important photobooks of all time - second only to 'Robert Frank: The Americans.'

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 2/24/2017

Valérie Belin Book Launch at Albertine

Tuesday, February 28 at 7 PM, Albertine presents photographer Valérie Belin and MoMA curator Quentin Bajac discussing Belin's new monograph from Damiani. Book signing to follow.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/24/2017

BACK IN STOCK! The Moon 1968–1972

On September 12, 1962, President John F. Kennedy delivered a speech laying out his plan to send men to the Moon. Before 35,000 people gathered at the Rice University football stadium, he concluded, "Many years ago the great British explorer George Mallory, who was to die on Mount Everest, was asked why did he want to climb it. He said, 'Because it is there.' Well, space is there, and we’re going to climb it, and the moon and the planets are there, and new hopes for knowledge and peace are there. And, therefore, as we set sail we ask God’s blessing on the most hazardous and dangerous and greatest adventure on which man has ever embarked." This text excerpt and Apollo 17 Commander Gene Cernan's 1972 photograph of Lunar Module Pilot Harrison Schmitt alongside "Tracy’s Rock" are reproduced from T. Adler's elegant new release, The Moon 1968–1972.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/23/2017

Judith Bernstein: Rising

"Cockman #1" (1966) is reproduced from Judith Bernstein: Rising, the first major monograph on this under-recognized American feminist painter (and former Guerilla Girl), published on the occasion of her recent retrospective at Kunsthall Stavanger in Norway. A portrait of Alabama governor George Wallace, who had uttered his notoriously racist “segregation forever” speech just three years earlier, "Cockman #1" is the first in a series of critical Cockman paintings that extends to the current day. "High on feminist ridicule, refusing to know her place, Bernstein continues to occupy male space," according to essayist Johanna Fateman. "She defaces it, ejaculates on it. With muscular gestures and muddy acrylics, she harps unapologetically, as crudely as possible, on the unapologetic fuckers, the interchangeable cock-faces and their fucking policies of neoliberalism and endless war. After all, what could be cruder or more horrifying?"

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/23/2017

100 Secrets of the Art World Launch at MoMA PS1

Sunday, January 29, MoMA PS1 presents a book launch for '100 Secrets of the Art World.' Authors Thomas Girst and Magnus Resch will appear in a panel discussion with Natasha Degen, Alexandra Munroe and Lisa Schiff. Book signing to follow.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/22/2017

See Red Women's Workshop

The feminist posters of the 1970s See Red Women's Workshop "hint at the great hopes that were aroused and sustained through sisterhood and through solidarities of race and class," Sheila Rowbotham writes in this timely compendium of radical British feminist posters from 1974 through 1990. "These were forceful enough to encourage many young women and men to bite the hand that fed them. Our subversive refusal was a profound recoil from a system based on inequality and a culture that confined self-expression and development to an elite. Much was to be crushed amidst a multitude of defeats. However, as a radical historian I have spent a lifetime chasing memories that appear to vanish below the surface, only to resurface in the most surprising ways. I sincerely hope that new hands will pick up these posters, bear them aloft and act upon them. For there is indeed a great deal that needs to be done." Recommended reading for this inaugural weekend.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/21/2017

See Red Women's Workshop

Need some Womens March on Washington inspiration? Look no further! This super-timely and inspiring look back at the radical feminist posters of the See Red Women's Workshop (active in the UK from 1974-1990) couldn't be better matched to today's historic protest march. Featured here, the collective's first commission, a poster for International Women's Day, 1975. Five thousand of these offset litho prints were wheat-pasted around London in advance of the March. Today, we celebrate the women who are showing up and speaking out in Washington, D.C. and throughout the country. We See Red!

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/20/2017

Mark Peterson: Political Theatre

"The source of much of the shocking surreality of the 2016 election can be easily and precisely identified," John Heilemann writes in Mark Peterson's mesmerizing 2016 election season photobook, Political Theatre: "Donald J. Trump. The rise to political prominence and power of the billionaire real-estate mogul, reality-TV star and self-branding virtuoso was not only a development unforeseen but deemed beyond the realm of possibility by virtually every Establishment politician, analyst and pundit. By any conventional metric, Trump was plainly unqualified to be president; he possessed neither the resume, the knowledge of domestic and foreign policy, nor the temperament ordinarily required to occupy the Oval Office..." > > continue> >

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/19/2017

Mark Peterson: Political Theatre

How did we get here? What do we do now? Featured image is reproduced from Mark Peterson: Political Theatre, a TIME magazine best photobook of 2016, a critic's pick at The New Yorker and Huffington Post, and certainly one of the best photographic records of an election cycle, ever. John Heilemann writes, "Peterson presents the drama and comedy, the transparent fakery and moments of accidental authenticity, and the abject chaos that has transfixed and often mortified anyone paying attention… Peterson has given us an indispensable record of an election at once more raw, divisive and shot through with a sense of desperation—and perhaps, for good or ill, more lastingly consequential—than any in our lifetime."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/18/2017

Lee Lozano: Lozano c. 1962

"For me there can be no art revolution that is separate from a science revolution, a political revolution, an education revolution, a drug revolution, a sex revolution or a personal revolution. I cannot consider a program of museum reforms without equal attention to gallery reforms and art magazine reforms which would aim to eliminate stables of artists and writers. I will not call myself an art worker but an art dreamer and I will participate only in a total revolution simultaneously personal and public." – Lee Lozano.

Featured image, no title (ca. 1962), is reproduced from Lozano c. 1962, featuring texts by Helen Molesworth and Bob Nickas, and published by Karma, New York.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/17/2017

Lee Lozano: Lozano c. 1962

In this small, pretty-much-perfect Lee Lozano exhibition catalog from Karma, curator, critic and Lozano authority Bob Nickas describes the artist's self-imposed exile from New York. "Lozano departed while still very much among the living, flipping a cerebral bird to the New York gallery world in 1971 never to return, an absence that extended for twenty-eight years, until her death in 1999. Her departure, it’s important to note, was not precipitated by the usual frustrations and disappointments that may occasion an artist to stop, or give up, having been offered less and less or nothing at all, but because she wanted something more of herself: to be the primary, driving force of her own destiny, no longer reliant on others for approval, love and direction." For a variety of reasons—including stellar texts, excellent design and production, and of course the work itself—this book is a must-have. Read more here.

MADDIE GILMORE | DATE 1/17/2017

Lee Lozano: Private Book 1

Our own Maddie Gilmore reviews Karma's incredibly lifelike facsimile edition of a 3x5-inch, spiral-bound private notebook kept by Lee Lozano from 1968-69.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/16/2017

Martin Luther King, Jr., Washington, D.C., 1963

On August 28, 1963, after months of organizing by civil rights leaders and labor representatives, the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom convened on the National Mall. It was the largest unified action for human and economic rights that had ever taken place in the United States. From the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, on the centennial of that president's Emancipation Proclamation, the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered his historic "I Have a Dream" speech, enjoining the nation to put an end to discrimination and intolerance. Gordon Parks was among the many Life staffers present to record the event. His photograph, "Martin Luther King, Jr., Washington, D.C., 1963," is reproduced from the essential new overview, Gordon Parks: I Am You.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/15/2017

Gordon Parks: I Am You

"Untitled," Shady Grove, Alabama (1956), is reproduced from Gordon Parks: I Am You. Shot on assignment for the 1956 Life magazine story "Segregation in the South," it is both a heartbreaking and supremely dignified image of Southern life under Jim Crow. Less than a decade later, Parks would document Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s history-making March on Washington, which we celebrate this weekend with all our hearts.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/14/2017

Kerry James Marshall: Look See

"I'm acutely aware of and obsessively invested in how the narrative of art history is structured, and the burden that history imposes on artists ambitious enough to dream of being part of it," painter Kerry James Marshall is quoted in Look See, published by David Zwirner Books. "Black artists have not really been significant players in that narrative for very long. It's only in the mid-twentieth century that you start seeing black people making artworks that were thought important enough to talk about in relationship to that history. So the challenge is to gain an uncontestable place in the pantheon of art history without surrendering the desire to make pictures with black figures." Featured image is "Untitled (Rapunzel)" (2014).

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/13/2017

Betye Saar: Uneasy Dancer

"Sock it to 'Em" (2011) is reproduced from Betye Saar: Uneasy Dancer, Fondazione Prada's astonishing new Irma Boom-designed survey of the artist's work and archives intermixed with a deep and rich timeline of the history of American civil rights. "Through Saar's work we look at black life as a series of events that occur over time," Deborah Willis writes. "The period starts with the first event, birth, and ends with the final event, death, resurrected through the life of the photograph. Through her work we relive family stories both celebratory and painful; we marvel over the preservation of family material culture from pincushions to religious objects. Saar is interested in shaping complex experiences through rediscovered artifacts, and 'intersectionality' is central to her narrative."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/12/2017

Paris Metro Photo

Reproduced from Actes Sud's stunning 408-page collection of Paris Metro photographs spanning from the late-1800s through the present day, this early 1930s photograph by Brassaï may carry one of the most evocative titles of any "subway" photograph, ever. In Brassaï's words, it reads, "At 1.1AM the 'last train out,' the impecunious nightbird's last resort, enters the Palais-Royal station." What a pleasure it is to read this book.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/11/2017

Paris Metro Photo

"After traveling through these 300-some stations, after journeying on these different lines, after embracing these 116 years of history (of Paris, of the Metro and of photography), one can't help but be struck by the extraordinary fertility and inexhaustible richness of a subject that has become invisible, so familiar is it to Parisians. We need the eye of the photographer to remind us of its diversity and singularity, its graphic elegance and geometric rigor, its shadows and lights, its perpetual movement, reflections, joys, sufferings, tragedies, its violence too, sometimes. Each period reveals a thousand different aspects, reflects its era, possesses its specificities, while at the same time foretelling certain trends and following others..." Continue > > >

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/10/2017

PARIS METRO PHOTO

Paris Metro Photo is here at last! From rare nineteenth-century photographs documenting the construction of the city's earliest subway tunnels to current-day photojournalism and street photography in and around the famous Paris metro, this remarkable collection features emblematic work by brilliant unknowns and Modern and contemporary masters alike. Dark, glamorous, romantic and humorous work by photographers including Henri Cartier-Bresson, Brassaï, Raymond Depardon, Joel Meyerowitz and Martin Parr make this exquisitely produced 408-page volume a pure pleasure from end(paper) to end(paper). The only book of its kind, Paris Metro Photo includes a superbly curated selection of journalistic, fashion, architectural and industrial work, in addition to documentary, art and street photography. Featured here is "Near the Galeries Lafayette," 1928, by André Kertész.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/10/2017

TONIGHT! City Lights Launches 'Shakespeare and Company, Paris'

Tonight, beginning at 7PM, City Lights Books presents editor Krista Halverson and guest speakers celebrating the release of 'Shakespeare and Company, Paris: A History of the Rag & Bone Shop of the Heart,' a copiously illustrated account of City Lights' famed Paris sister store on its 65th anniversary.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/9/2017

Louis Faurer

"I have an intense desire to record life as I see it, as I feel it. As long as I'm amazed and astonished, as long as I feel that events, messages, expressions and movements are all shot through with the miraculous, I'll feel filled with the certainty I need to keep going. When that day comes, my doubts will vanish."
– Louis Faurer, 1974.

"Deaf Mute, New York" (1950) is reproduced from Steidl and Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson's perfectly concise new monograph—the first to be published on this under-recognized American master in 15 years.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/8/2017

Constant: New Babylon. To Us, Liberty

In 1974, Dutch artist, Situationist and COBRA cofounder Constant described his now-legendary plan for a utopian city without borders, which he refined and reworked for the better part of 20 years. "A symbolic representation of the dynamic labyrinth: that is how New Babylon can be interpreted. For me it was the disintegration that had to end the exhibition. You know Rimbaud's saying 'The idea is to reach the unknown by the derangement of all the senses.' I am not even talking about an alternative future, for I do not say: this is the future. I am no prophet. I merely say: one could live better, or at any rate on a higher lever. How? you might ask. Instead of always having to toil and labor, be slaves, people could be free. And to me, freedom is creativity." Featured image, of Constant's model "Klein Labyr (Little Labyr) (1959) is reproduced from Constant: New Babylon, Hatje Cantz's exemplary catalogue to the recent exhibition at Gemeente Museum, The Hague.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/7/2017

Constant: Space + Colour

In a 1948 manifesto published in the first issue of Reflex magazine, which he co-founded with likeminded artists Corneille, Karel Appel and his brother Jan Nieuwenhuys, radical Dutch artist, author, designer and musician Constant wrote, "A painting is not a structure of colors and lines, but an animal, a night, a cry, a man, or all of these together." A founder of the CoBrA movement and an important member of the Situationist International, Constant devoted two decades of work to his utopian vision for New Babylon, "a world wide city for the future." Adieu la P. (1962), pictured here, "hints at a farewell to painting," according to Constant: Space + Colour, From Cobra to New Babylon, brand new from nai010. "Urbanism, for Constant, was not limited to spatial planning; it was an entirely new, all-encompassing art form whereby visual artists and engineers would work together on a new city of the future."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/6/2017

Henry Wessel: Traffic/Sunset Park/Continental Divide

Featured photograph, from Steidl's gorgeously produced new release—one of the first from our Spring 2017 list—is from Henry Wessel's early '80s Traffic series, in which Wessel photographed Northern California commuters stuck in San Francisco rush hour traffic. ARTFORUM's Sarah Moroz writes, "The people behind the wheel, rolling along in Mustangs, Chevrolets and Bertones, are both vague prototypes and unknowable: a woman in a head scarf, a man in a bow tie. There is something intimate and voyeuristic about fixedly watching these partially visible figures—who are mostly unaware of our gaze—even though they’re circulating in public space." > > continue > >

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/5/2017

Kandinsky, Marc, and Der Blaue Reiter

In January of 1912, painter Franz Marc wrote the following description of the Modern movement and almanac he would found with Wassily Kandinsky in the spring of that same year. "Today art is moving in a direction of which our fathers would never even have dreamed… We know that the basic ideas of what we feel and create today have existed before us, and we are emphasizing that in essence they are not new… The first volume herewith announced… includes the latest movements in French, German and Russian painting. It reveals subtle connections with Gothic and primitive art, with Africa and the vast Orient, with the highly expressive, spontaneous folk and children's art, and especially with the most recent musical movements in Europe and the new ideas for theater of our time." > > continue > >

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/4/2017

Gordon Parks: I Am You

In a photo essay published in the March 8, 1968 issue of Life, African-American polymath Gordon Parks wrote, "What I want. What I am. What you force me to be is what you are. For I am you, staring back from a mirror of poverty and despair, of revolt and freedom. Look at me and know that to destroy me is to destroy yourself. You are weary of the long hot summers. I am tired of the long hungered winters. We are not so far apart as it might seem. There is something about both of us that goes deeper than blood or black and white. It is our common search for a better life, a better world. I march now over the same ground you once marched. I fight for the same things you still fight for. My children's needs are the same as your children's. I too am America. America is me..." continue > >

DATE 11/15/2016

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: Stocking Stuffers

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: Stocking Stuffers

They're cute, they're small, they're surprising and affordable. Here are 10 staff picks for the stockings on your list »

DATE 11/14/2016

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: For the Bookworm - Great Reads

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: For the Bookworm - Great Reads

10 must-have reading books, from the new Shakespeare and Company "memoir" to Ricky Jay's astonishing story of a 17th-century conjurer »

DATE 11/13/2016

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: For the Art Lover

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: For the Art Lover

Our staff picks the must-have art books of 2016, from overlooked Renaissance masters to Modern heroes of the avant garde »

DATE 11/12/2016

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: For the Photographer and Photography Collector

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: For the Photographer and Photography Collector

For photography lovers – here are 10 of our favorite 2016 monographs by Modern and contemporary photographers »

DATE 11/11/2016

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: For the Design Devotee

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: For the Design Devotee

Our staff picks the must-have architecture and design books of 2016, from radical 1970s pedagogy to visionary unbuilt architecture of NYC »

DATE 11/10/2016

For the Collector: Limited Editions & Catalogues Raisonnés

For the Collector: Limited Editions & Catalogues Raisonnés

From the 10-volume Francis Bacon catalogue raisonné to Carrie Mae Weems' 'Kitchen Table Series' ltd ed with print - our top picks for collectors »

DATE 10/9/2016

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: For the New Yorker

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: For the New Yorker

Whether you love it or hate it, left it or long for it - here are our 10 favorite gift books for the New Yorkers in your life »

DATE 11/8/2016

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: For the Fashion Forward

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: For the Fashion Forward

From Van Cleef & Arpels gems and Hermès scarves to behind-the-runway photography books - our staff favorite holiday fashion gift books »

DATE 11/7/2016

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: For Film Buffs and Audiophiles

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: For Film Buffs and Audiophiles

Gus Van Sant, Bruce Springsteen, Robert Frank, Kim Gordon, Iggy Pop and Jim Marshall's photos of jazz greats like Thelonius Monk are some of our favorite books for audio- and cinephiles, 2016 »

DATE 11/6/2016

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: Staff Favorites

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: Staff Favorites

10 books that we love outside of logic, beyond our control, or for reasons unknown, even to ourselves. Holiday Gift Staff Favorites, 2016 »

DATE 11/5/2016

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: Books for Him

Holiday Gift Guide 2016: Books for Him

From Muhammad Ali to 19th-century nocturnal wildlife photography: 10 handsome books for the men in your life »

DATE 1/9/2017

Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights

Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights

This weekend, the world lost jazz and civil rights champion Nat Hentoff, one of the greatest and most passionate music journalists of all time. In memoriam, we are honored to present Hentoff's eloquently direct text, 'Jazz Festivals and the Changing of America,' from 'Jim Marshall: Jazz Festival' by Reel Art Press.

DATE 6/6/2016

Agnes Martin: "Beauty Is the Mystery of Life"

Agnes Martin: "Beauty Is the Mystery of Life"

In celebration of the retrospective currently on view at LACMA, we present an excerpt of Agnes Martin's iconic 1989 essay, reproduced from 'Agnes Martin.' In the 'New York Times Book Review' Patricia Albers made special note of this text, asserting that it is "not to be missed."

DATE 6/15/2015

The Future of the Skyscraper

The Future of the Skyscraper

Last week, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and Metropolis Books launched the SOM THINKERS series with 'The Future of the Skyscraper,' featuring texts by Bruce Sterling, Tom Vanderbilt, Matthew Yglesias, Diana Lind, Will Self, Emily Badger, Dickson Despommier and Philip Nobel, whose Introduction is excerpted here.



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