ARTBOOK LOGO

ARTBOOK BLOG

WHAT'S NEW?
EVENTS
BOOKS IN THE MEDIA
AT FIRST SIGHT
FEATURED IMAGES
EX LIBRIS
ARTBOOK INTERVIEWS
EXCERPTS & ESSAYS
FROM THE SHELVES

RECENT POSTS

DATE 4/19/2014

Sigmar Polke: Alibis

DATE 4/17/2014

Sigmar Polke: Alibis 1963-2010

DATE 4/16/2014

'Richard Serra: Early Work' Launch Events at The Strand and NYPL

DATE 4/15/2014

Episodes with Wayne Thiebaud

DATE 4/13/2014

Trevor Winkfield

DATE 4/10/2014

'The Sick Rose' Lecture and Book Signing at Morbid Anatomy Library

DATE 4/10/2014

Reading Andy Warhol

DATE 4/9/2014

Show Time: The 50 Most Influential Exhibitions of Contemporary Art

DATE 4/7/2014

Eva Hesse: One More than One

DATE 4/4/2014

Abiding Architecture III: 10 days, 26 People, 4 Projects, 11 Languages and 1 site in Titanyen, Haiti: Us and Them

DATE 4/4/2014

Charles Traub: Dolce Via: Italy in the 1980s

DATE 4/2/2014

Martin Creed: What's the Point of It?

DATE 4/2/2014

'Geometric Sociology' in Christoph Gielen: Ciphers

DATE 4/1/2014

Metropolis Live! Susan S. Szenasy to Speak in Boston

DATE 3/31/2014

'Larry Sultan & Mike Mandel: Evidence' eBook Now Available from iTunes

DATE 3/30/2014

Soviets: Drawings by Danzig Baldaev & Photographs by Sergei Vasiliev

DATE 3/28/2014

Richard Serra: Early Work

DATE 3/27/2014

'Emilie Brzezinksi: The Lure of the Forest' Featured on 'Morning Joe'

DATE 3/27/2014

Sarah Jones

DATE 3/25/2014

Derek Ridgers: 78-87 London Youth

DATE 3/22/2014

Philip-Lorca diCorcia

DATE 3/19/2014

Susan S. Szenasy & Debbie Millman to Launch 'Szenasy, Design Advocate' with Conversation at Museum of Arts and Design, NY

DATE 3/18/2014

Xavier Guardans: Windows

DATE 3/18/2014

The King of Kowloon: The Art of Tsang Tsou Choi

DATE 3/17/2014

'Lutz Bacher: Snow' Launch at Greene Naftali

DATE 3/16/2014

Futurism and Dance

DATE 3/14/2014

Favelization: The Imaginary Brazil in Contemporary Film, Fashion and Design

DATE 3/14/2014

Italian Futurism, 1909-1944: Reconstructing the Universe

DATE 3/12/2014

Surrealism and the Dream

DATE 3/10/2014

Robert Heinecken: Object Matter

DATE 3/7/2014

'Maria Lassnig: The Location of Pictures' at ARTBOOK @ MoMA PS1

DATE 3/6/2014

Celebrate 'You Should've Heard Just What I Seen' with DJ set by Matthew Higgs Friday, March 7 at Gavin Brown's Enterprise

DATE 3/5/2014

Join ARTBOOK at The Armory Show, March 6-9

DATE 3/5/2014

Nancy Graves Project & Special Guests

DATE 3/3/2014

Show Time: The 50 Most Influential Exhibitions of Contemporary Art

DATE 3/3/2014

Major Exhibition of Austrian Artist Maria Lassnig’s Work Opens at MoMA PS1 This Sunday, March 9th

DATE 3/2/2014

Visit ARTBOOK @ Collective 2 Design Fair

DATE 2/28/2014

Keiichi Tanaami: Killer Joe's Early Times 1965-73

DATE 2/26/2014

Cuba in Revolution

DATE 2/25/2014

Tom Dixon Presentation & Booksigning February 27 at Twentieth Gallery, Los Angeles

DATE 2/24/2014

Looking East: Western Artists and the Allure of Japan

DATE 2/23/2014

Mostly Sunny, With a Sense of Menace: William Christenberry

DATE 2/21/2014

The Eye of the Storm: Gerhard Richter Catalogue Raisonné, Volume 3

DATE 2/20/2014

It Is Almost That: Ann Hamilton, Jane Hammond & Lisa Pearson, March 5 at the NYPL

DATE 2/20/2014

Aaron Stern: I Woke Up in My Clothes

DATE 2/18/2014

21st-Century Portraits

DATE 2/18/2014

Cape Cod Modern Co-Author Previews Book at Design Within Reach, Boston

DATE 2/15/2014

Edvard Munch: A Genius of Printmaking

DATE 2/14/2014

Anthony McCall Book Launch at Sean Kelly Gallery

DATE 2/14/2014

Marian Bantjes: Pretty Pictures

DATE 2/12/2014

Propaganda! Russian and Norwegian Posters 1920-1939


FEATURED IMAGES

Sigmar Polke: Alibis

DATE 4/19/2014

Sigmar Polke: Alibis

"In December 1968, at the Galerie Rene Block in Berlin, Sigmar Polke mounted a show called Moderne Kunst (Modern art). Alongside other works was a canvas of the same name, with the title painted inside a white border in black italics, like a caption for an image in an old exhibition catalogue (pictured). The painting resembled what many people might regard as a typical specimen of modern art: a black background with the upper-right and lower-left corners painted red and white, a yellow squiggle curving downward from the top, a spiral looping upward, and angular strokes forming a number four and a cross that floats diagonally across the composition. Polke had finished it off with a splatter of bright purple paint. Many art historians have seen this painting as a summation of Polke's position on abstraction circa 1968. In 1976 Barbara Reise recalled its humor and Polke's 'knowledgeable irreverence about contemporary fashions in 20th century art history and criticism'; in 1982 Benjamin H. D. Buchloh—who had put Modern Art on the cover of the catalogue for the retrospective he organized in 1976—drew attention to the arbitrariness and incompatibility of the abstract styles in the painting, writing, 'We find gestures of Modernist painting emptied, made futile by parodistic repetition.' By quoting and debasing the language of abstraction associated with Kazimir Malevich, Vasily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, El Lissitzky, and Jackson Pollock, Polke seemed to signal that each set of forms had become a cliche, and that the claims once made by these artists and on their behalf could no longer be taken seriously." Featured passage, from Mark Godfrey's catalogue essay, is excerpted from Sigmar Polke: Alibis, published to accompany the major retrospective on view at MoMA through August 3.

Sigmar Polke: Alibis 1963-2010

DATE 4/17/2014

Sigmar Polke: Alibis 1963-2010

"In the 1970s travel, like meditation or drug consumption, was one of what Michel Foucault would later call "technologies of the self": practices or techniques that promised expanded consciousness and psychedelic experiences. Drifters and young members of various subcultures created a kind of alternative tourism, opening new routes and means of travel remote from the streams of tourists in more expected places. Like many artists in the early 1970s Polke hit the road. Like other tourists he brought cameras and film. In 1978 he made large-format prints of some black-and-white photographs that he had taken in Pakistan four years earlier, one of which shows men smoking water or opium pipes. Polke painted on the image with various colors of the egg-white glazes commonly used to retouch photographs, so that sometimes the paint tints the men's robes, making the photograph resemble illustrations in the travel books and magazines Polke collected, and at other times it extends across the surface independent of the subject matter, like an orientalizing ornament. The entertainment journal Praline called Afghanistan 'a country outside of time, perhaps . . . something like the last refuge of timelessness'—a swooning description, as if made by 'the children of Marx and Coca-Cola.' Polke's artistic innovations were not in evidence in the photographs taken on the spot; they surfaced afterward in his studio and his darkroom." Featured passage, by Kathrin Rottmann, is excerpted from Sigmar Polke: Alibis, the exhibition catalog to the major retrospective opening at MoMA April 19. Featured image is "Untitled (Quetta, Pakistan)" (1974-78).

Episodes with Wayne Thiebaud

DATE 4/15/2014

Episodes with Wayne Thiebaud

There's nothing so satisfying for me as hearing or reading an artist unfurling the tangled strands of their art history, biography and ideas in casual conversation. In the case of Wayne Thiebaud in Black Square Editions' new release, Episodes with Wayne Thiebaud, it's doubly satisfying since, despite the seeming ubiquity of his images, the man himself has mostly remained silent, preferring the paintings to speak for themselves. Two former students, the painters Eve Aschheim and Chris Daubert, set out to remedy this via four lengthy interviews (the titular episodes) from 2009 to 2011. Thiebaud emerges as voluble, modest, and quietly cool on these pages, as he recounts his early days in Sacramento, his visits to New York, and his own pantheon of art historical heroes, about whom he is insightful and, even at age 93, with whom he is still clearly enamored. Best of all, and what makes this book delightful and even essential, is the way he deftly moves from modest theory to first-hand knowledge, as in this passage on how paintings function in different spaces:

"When I go to Charlie Campbell's house, for instance, it's very interesting the way his house is full of paintings and pre-Columbian art and everything he loves, but the nice thing is that almost every time you go, they've changed the arrangements. It's fascinating the way the paintings in various ways function differently from one another. The only thing that interests me about a painting's function is the expectancy factor, what it can do and what it really can't do. I remember de Kooning saying, 'Goddamn people are going to break the back of painting. They're expecting so many things it can't do.' And he says on the other hand, 'What it can do is miraculous, that you have to believe in those miracles, and you have to understand what they are.'

Why does the blue function as it does? And learning to read and live in paintings, if that isn't happening on the level of what it really can do, then painting is something else entirely: it's a social instrument, an illustration, a story. But that's not painting for people who love painting. You love the paint. What's that little gob there, you know? Why it can function as it does, and how come you can make glass out of paint, and also pork chops, and crystalline, and silver? And can you make everything out of paintings? Damn near."

Those two paragraphs span a lot of mental space, and so does this amply illustrated and very handsome book. Thiebaud is the kind of conversationalist who makes you want to stay a while.

Featured image, "Half-Dome and Cloud" (1975; mountain painted from life, with invented cloud), is reproduced from Black Square Editions' Episodes with Wayne Thiebaud.

DATE 4/10/2014

Reading Andy Warhol

DATE 3/27/2014

Sarah Jones

DATE 3/22/2014

Philip-Lorca diCorcia

DATE 3/16/2014

Futurism and Dance

DATE 2/26/2014

Cuba in Revolution

DATE 2/9/2014

Lightopia

DATE 2/5/2014

Mernet Larsen

DATE 1/30/2014

Julian Hoeber

DATE 1/17/2014

Anders Petersen

DATE 1/14/2014

Leonora Carrington



ARTBOOK LOGO
 
 

the artworld's favorite source for books on art and culture

  

CUSTOMER SERVICE
orders@artbook.com
212 627 1999
M-F 9-5 EST

TRADE ACCOUNTS

800 338 2665

CONTACT

JOBS + INTERNSHIPS

NEW YORK
Showroom by Appointment Only
155 Sixth Avenue
New York NY 10013
Tel   212 627 1999

LOS ANGELES
Showroom by Appointment Only
818 Broadway
Los Angeles CA 90812
Tel   213 888 7957

ARTBOOK LLC
D.A.P. | Distributed Art Publishers, Inc.


All site content Copyright C 2000-2013 by Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. and the respective publishers, authors, artists. For reproduction permissions, contact the copyright holders.

ARTBOOK AMPERSAT

The D.A.P. Catalog
www.artbook.com