ARTBOOK LOGO

ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 5/3/2017

VOTI Book Launch and Discussion at ICI Curatorial Hub

DATE 4/25/2017

Sophie Calle's exquisite tribute to her mother, Rachel Monique

DATE 4/24/2017

Sophie Calle as Spie: Suite Vénitienne

DATE 4/23/2017

Sophie Calle: Double Game, a 'delightfully meta project'

DATE 4/22/2017

Sophie Calle Short List: The Address Book

DATE 4/21/2017

Quiet Sublime: Toba Khedoori

DATE 4/20/2017

Langdon Clay's Parade of Parked Cars in NY in the Magic Years 1974-1976

DATE 4/19/2017

New Topographics essential: the first comprehensive retrospective since Lewis Baltz's death in 2014

DATE 4/19/2017

In Memoriam: Barkley L. Hendricks, 1945-2017

DATE 4/19/2017

Sophie Calle Signing at 192 Books

DATE 4/18/2017

Join ARTBOOK | D.A.P. at the 2017 MSA Conference

DATE 4/18/2017

High-resolution, artless and very distancing: Lewis Baltz

DATE 4/17/2017

'David Freund: Gas Stop' - 4 Volume Ltd Ed from Steidl

DATE 4/16/2017

Matisse in the Studio

DATE 4/15/2017

The Silver Chocolate Pot of Henri Matisse

DATE 4/14/2017

Matisse in the Studio

DATE 4/13/2017

Monet: Reflections and Shadows

DATE 4/12/2017

Sophie Calle in the News!

DATE 4/12/2017

Lost Futures: The Disappearing Architecture of Post-War Britain

DATE 4/11/2017

Revolution: Russian Art 1917–1932

DATE 4/10/2017

Revolution: Russian Art 1917–1932

DATE 4/9/2017

Eduardo Paolozzi

DATE 4/9/2017

Eduardo Paolozzi

DATE 4/7/2017

Jason Fox

DATE 4/6/2017

Back in the USSR!

DATE 4/6/2017

Alcohol: Soviet Anti-Alcohol Posters

DATE 4/5/2017

Alcohol: Soviet Anti-Alcohol Posters

DATE 4/4/2017

Arbus Friedlander Winogrand: New Documents, 1967

DATE 4/3/2017

Ida Applebroog: Mercy Hospital

DATE 4/2/2017

Linda Foard Roberts: Passage

DATE 4/1/2017

Arbus Friedlander Winogrand: New Documents, 1967

DATE 4/1/2017

MoMA Presents 'Arbus Friedlander Winogrand: New Documents, 1967' at the Strand

DATE 4/1/2017

Jamel Shabazz to Launch 'Sights in the City' at BOOKMARC

DATE 3/31/2017

Larry Sultan & Mike Mandel: Evidence

DATE 3/30/2017

Anthony Hernandez

DATE 3/29/2017

Karl Blossfeldt: Masterworks

DATE 3/28/2017

Philip Trager: New York in the 1970s

DATE 3/27/2017

New York in Photobooks

DATE 3/26/2017

James 'Son Ford' Thomas: The Devil and His Blues

DATE 3/24/2017

Marguerita Mergentime: American Textiles, Modern Ideas

DATE 3/24/2017

Karl Blossfeldt: Masterworks

DATE 3/24/2017

Maddie Gilmore on the Textiles of Marguerita Mergentime

DATE 3/24/2017

Join ARTBOOK | D.A.P. at the AIPAD Photography Show

DATE 3/23/2017

Models Matter

DATE 3/22/2017

Trisha Brown, 1936 - 2017

DATE 3/21/2017

Christopher Niquet to Launch 'Models Matter' at BOOKMARC

DATE 3/21/2017

Merce Cunningham: Common Time - Rei Kawakubo

DATE 3/20/2017

Marsie Scharlatt & Aram Saroyan Launch 'A Breathed Yes' at ARTBOOK @ Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles

DATE 3/20/2017

Felix Gonzalez-Torres: Specific Objects Without Specific Form

DATE 3/19/2017

Miralda: El Internacional (1984–1986)

DATE 3/18/2017

Yayoi Kusama Takes On Hans Christian Andersen's 'Little Mermaid'


AT FIRST SIGHT

MING LIN | DATE 7/8/2011

Documenta Notebooks: Ian Wallace, The First Documenta, 1955

Ian Wallace is well versed in the power of the image. Often recognized as the father of the Vancouver School of conceptual photography, which includes renowned artists such as Jeff Wall and Rodney Graham, he has pioneered a style that employs and critiques the tropes of mass media, often by way of reference to pop culture and contemporary events. These artists seek to apply the tools of conceptual art to photography in hopes of instigating social change. Jeff Wall's photos, for example, recall cinematic tableaux but are host to less romantic themes such as changing demographics in cities and suburban dystopias. Wallace’s works, which often meld painting and photography, contemplate the dual identity of the artist as both the passive observer and, conversely, authoritative documentarian of society.
Befitting his interest in the social impact of visual culture, Wallace's contribution to 100 Notes is a thorough history of the Documenta Festival itself, as well as a lesson on the socio-historical narratives that underpin aesthetics. The festival, which debuted in 1955 in Kassel, Germany, can be seen as an attempt to redress the wounds of the country’s recent past. Arnold Bode and Werner Haftman, chief curators of the festival, sought to reinsert German artists onto the international stage by delineating the history of modern art from a distinctly German perspective. While socialist realism had been the dominant art form during the Nazi regime, the festival, in an effort to break completely with this dark period, chose to omit this body of work completely. Modernism in Germany took the form of abstraction. Theodor Adorno contended that art could only speak of social truth if it was “autonomously created.” Whereas realism implied conformity and domineering ideologies, Wallace shows how abstraction--free from the figure and the constraints imposed upon it--offered flight into the inner spirit. Redemption would require the “negation of the object.” By disassociating the image from politics, art could claim its autonomy.

The Nazi regime, Wallace argues, had taught the viewer to regard art in ideological terms. In a re-emerging capitalist society, abstraction ultimately found itself absorbed into consumer culture. Its “relaxed, tumbling, exciting colors” were incorporated into product designs, propelling the average German household into the modern era. Wallace notes this as a necessary step in the process of “redemption, reconciliation, and reintegration.” The Documenta festival, as its name suggests, served to document these events.

An interesting development in Germany's attempts to come to peace with its past has been the ascent of the anti-monument. Inconspicuous in size and shape, these silent structures speak volumes about the Nazi era but offer little by way of absolution. There is no opportunity for the viewer to project and forget, instead a constant dialogue is maintained. Wallace is keenly aware of the hand art has in reshaping the social landscape. In Germany, the Documenta festival has and continues to be, in Haftman's own words: “not only a convenient pretense for aesthetic discussion and information, but equally a means of becoming acquainted with inner proceedings and their solution.” Like the anti-monument, Documenta seeks not to conclude these stories, but to continue and make use of their messages.
Documenta Notebooks: Ian Wallace, The First Documenta, 1955
Documenta Notebooks: Ian Wallace, The First Documenta, 1955
Documenta Notebooks: Ian Wallace, The First Documenta, 1955
Documenta Notebooks: Ian Wallace, The First Documenta, 1955
Documenta Notebooks: Ian Wallace, The First Documenta, 1955
Documenta Notebooks: Ian Wallace, The First Documenta, 1955
Documenta Notebooks: Ian Wallace, The First Documenta, 1955

Ian Wallace: The First Documenta, 1955

Ian Wallace: The First Documenta, 1955

HATJE CANTZ
Pbk, 7 x 9.75 in. / 40 pgs / 1 color.

$10.00  free shipping

DATE 8/23/2015

Xanti Schawinsky

Xanti Schawinsky

DATE 7/31/2015

Axel Hoedt

Axel Hoedt

DATE 9/11/2014

New York Is ...

New York Is ...

DATE 5/13/2014

Libuse Niklová

Libuse Niklová


ARTBOOK LOGO
 
 

the art world's source for books on art & culture

  

CUSTOMER SERVICE
orders@artbook.com
212 627 1999
M-F 9-5 EST

TRADE ACCOUNTS

800 338 2665

CONTACT

JOBS + INTERNSHIPS

NEW YORK
Showroom by Appointment Only
75 Broad Street, Suite 630
New York NY 10004
Tel   212 627 1999

LOS ANGELES
Showroom by Appointment Only
818 S. Broadway, Suite 700
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Tel. 323 969 8985

ARTBOOK LLC
D.A.P. | Distributed Art Publishers, Inc.


All site content Copyright C 2000-2017 by Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. and the respective publishers, authors, artists. For reproduction permissions, contact the copyright holders.

ARTBOOK AMPERSAT

The D.A.P. Catalog
www.artbook.com