ARTBOOK LOGO

ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 9/24/2018

Karine Laval to launch 'Poolscapes' at SOCO

DATE 9/23/2018

Roxane Gay on Karen Green's 'Frail Sister'

DATE 9/19/2018

From darkness to the full power of the sun: Masahisa Fukase

DATE 9/18/2018

Better than we even dreamed: Led Zeppelin by Led Zeppelin

DATE 9/17/2018

Artbook @ MoMA PS1 Bookstore signings and launch events at the NYABF 2018

DATE 9/17/2018

How we love the radicality of Judson Dance Theater in 'The Work Is Never Done'

DATE 9/16/2018

'Soul of a Nation' as seismic detector, political persuader and defensive weapon

DATE 9/16/2018

Roy DeCarava's Black abstraction in Soul of a Nation

DATE 9/15/2018

It's NATION TIME! Celebrate art in the age of Black Power with 'Soul of a Nation'

DATE 9/14/2018

Celebrating Soul of a Nation

DATE 9/14/2018

David Hammons' "Black First, America Second" in Soul of a Nation

DATE 9/13/2018

Celebrate NYC Fashion Week with 'Sorolla and Fashion'

DATE 9/12/2018

Burt Glinn's photographs of the New York Beat Scene on view at Jason McCoy Gallery

DATE 9/12/2018

Celebrate Fashion Week NYC with the game-changing photography in 'Posturing'

DATE 9/11/2018

Artbook @ MoMA PS1 Bookstore presents "Les Masques" children's workshop with Louise-Marie Cumont

DATE 9/11/2018

Extreme clothing in the visual arts in 'Fashion Drive'

DATE 9/10/2018

Celebrate Fashion Week NY with Stephanie Pfriender Stylander's 'The Untamed Eye'

DATE 9/9/2018

Celebrate NYC Fashion Week with Viktor & Rolf

DATE 9/8/2018

Celebrate Fashion Week NY with 'Just Loomis: Backstage,' new from Hatje Cantz

DATE 9/7/2018

Celebrate Fashion Week with GingerNutz in Paris!

DATE 9/6/2018

Fashion Week Staff Favorite 'GingerNutz Takes Paris' reeks with chic

DATE 9/5/2018

This beautiful 350-page Hokusai monograph is NEW from Skira

DATE 9/4/2018

BACK IN STOCK! Sory Sanlé: Volta Photo

DATE 9/3/2018

Charmingly stoic and exasperatingly austere: Seaside Shelters

DATE 9/2/2018

'Will Scott: Seaside Shelters' is an end-of-summer staff favorite

DATE 9/1/2018

Back To School Reading

DATE 9/1/2018

Will Scott photographed British sea shelters—among the smallest and the biggest hearted buildings ever built

DATE 8/31/2018

Remembering Princess Diana in 'Tudors to Windsors: British Royal Portraits'

DATE 8/30/2018

NEW! Yayoi Kusama: Festival of Life

DATE 8/30/2018

Ben Lerner & Michelle Kuo launch 'Alexander Kluge & Ben Lerner: The Snows of Venice' at MAST

DATE 8/29/2018

'Film Culture 80: The Legend of Barbara Rubin' Launch at Printed Matter

DATE 8/29/2018

New work by Yayoi Kusama in 'Festival of Life'

DATE 8/28/2018

What is it about 'Spomenik Monument Database'?

DATE 8/28/2018

WATCH the 'Led Zeppelin by Led Zeppelin' book trailer!

DATE 8/27/2018

Just a few of the reasons why we can't get over this new Karel Teige monograph

DATE 8/26/2018

'This Is No Dream: Making Rosemary's Baby' reviewed in 'The Washington Post'

DATE 8/24/2018

NEW! James Turrell: Extraordinary Ideas—Realized

DATE 8/24/2018

James Turrel, light and revelation

DATE 8/23/2018

'This Is No Dream: Making Rosemary's Baby' launch at IFC

DATE 8/23/2018

A remarkable facsimile of Ibrahim El-Salahi's 1976 prison notebook

DATE 8/23/2018

Artbook Editions to launch 'Went Home Due to All the Noise' print by Mindy Abovitz-Monk

DATE 8/22/2018

Like riding a comet: Jack Whitten's 'Notes from the Woodshed'

DATE 8/21/2018

Hidden treasure brought to light in 'Jack Whitten: Notes from the Woodshed'

DATE 8/20/2018

All about… the inadvertent success of Saul Leiter

DATE 8/19/2018

Elation and awe in 'All about Saul Leiter'

DATE 8/18/2018

Time stops in 'Evelyn Hofer: New York'

DATE 8/17/2018

Radiating authenticity: Evelyn Hofer

DATE 8/16/2018

Michael Jackson, Michelangelo and David LaChapelle, 'On the Wall'

DATE 8/15/2018

KAWS on Michael Jackson, 'On the Wall'

DATE 8/14/2018

But wow! The Americans!

DATE 8/13/2018

BACK IN STOCK! Robert Frank: The Americans


EXCERPTS & ESSAYS

KLAUS OTTMANN | DATE 8/18/2010

Yves Klein's "Ethics" of Style
By Klaus Ottmann from Yves Klein By Himself, published by Dilecta, 2010

Yves Klein (1928-1962) was an agitator of ideas, a total artist who used his considerable charisma to propagate social change through art. In his writings and talks, Klein drew on a vast repertoire of philosophical, scientific, political and occult materials, synthesizing them into a declamatory propaganda for his own art. Yves Klein by Himself is a composite biography of one of the most influential artists of the second half of the twentieth century. Neither an intellectual biography nor an art-historical analysis, Yves Klein by Himself is rather a kind of "Klein reader" that lets the artist speak through his ideas and philosophical conceptions, and in doing so attempts to reconstruct his "organized network of obsessions." To this end, it intermixes biographical facts, a selection of texts by the writers and artists who influenced Klein, a glossary of keywords with Klein's own definitions derived from published texts as well as previously unpublished manuscripts and a selection of critical writings with analyses of Klein's philosophical ideas by the author and editor of this volume, Klein scholar Klaus Ottmann.

The following excerpt, from Chapter V, presents Ottmann's brilliant explication of Klein's "ethics" of style.

V: Grace into Style

Style is the general necessity seen sub specie aeterni.
– Ludwig Wittgenstein

Style is the ultimate morality of mind.
Alfred North Whitehead

When Yves Klein arrived in New York to show his blue monochromes at Leo Castelli’s gallery in 1961, the New York art world objected not so much to his work than to his style. For years to come, American reviewers continued to focus on Klein’s appearance, dismissing him as an “entertainer and idea man.” American Pop art, as Roland Barthes observed so keenly, was anti-style; it was about neutralizing identity:

"Pop art is well aware that the fundamental expression of the person is style. As Buffon said (a celebrated remark, once known to every French schoolboy): “Style is the man.” Take away style and there is no longer any (individual) man. The notion of style, in all the arts, has therefore been linked, historically, to a humanism of the person... There is, as I see it, a certain relation between pop art and what is called “script,” that anonymous writing style sometimes taught to dysgraphic children because it is inspired by the neutral and, so to speak, elementary features of typography. Further, we must realize that if pop art depersonalizes, it does not make anonymous: nothing is more identifiable than Marilyn...; they are in fact nothing but that: ...teaching us that identity is not the person: the future world risks being a world of identities... but not of persons."

Klein’s emphasis on style must be viewed in the context of the French notion of civilization. Unlike his contemporaries, especially the Teutonic-shamanistic Joseph Beuys or the orgiastic Viennese actionists Otto Mühl and Hermann Nitzsch, Klein always presented himself and his art in a proper, civilized manner – notably during his performances of the Anthropometries, when he directing his “living brushes” from a distance like a Master of Ceremonies, never touching the models or the paintings with his own hands.

In 1828 the historian and future Prime Minister of France, François Guizot announced, in his lectures on the “The General History of Civilization in Europe,” that “France has been... the home of civilization in Europe,” and, by 1852, when Alphonse de Lamartine, the nineteenth-century poet and politician, founded the journal Le Civilisateur, civilization had become synonymous with France.

Unlike Beuys in Germany and Klein in France, Andy Warhol shifted artistic personality from himself onto his objects, or even his critics (he would frequently tell interviewers to write his answers to their questions). Klein’s style is an essential part of his art and of its humanism. Even when he yielded the actual production of a painting to his models during the making of his Anthropometries, he never conceded his role as an artist. His presence in these performances was essential, very unlike the modus operandi of Warhol who would simply turn on his film camera and walk away, letting those in front of the camera take control. (“I make nothing happen.”)

Wittgenstein’s famous dictum that “ethics and aesthetics are one” has to be read in the context of the philosopher’s understanding of philosophy as a living practice. Ethics includes an aesthetical component, and vice versa. For Wittgenstein – as for Nietzsche before him – art and morality are closely tied. All aesthetic activity is also ethical, just as philosophy is a practice of life, a Lebensphilosophie. It is through style that philosophical and aesthetical practices become authentic. Philosophy and art are forms of life:

"To imagine a language means to imagine a form of life [Lebensform]."

Language is an activity or a form of life: “The term “language-game” is meant to bring into prominence the fact that the speaking of language is part of an activity, or of a form of life.”

Wittgenstein’s note about style that serves as an epigraph to this chapter was written in the 1930s but is directly related to a remark found in his notebooks of 1915–16:

"The work of art is the object seen sub specie aeternitatis; and the good life is the world seen sub specie aeternitatis. This is the connection between art and ethics."

Both remarks relate to a reference in Spinoza’s Ethics to “sub specie aeternitatis” (under the aspect of eternity, i.e., universally and eternally true), which Spinoza links to human freedom. Hegel writes about Spinoza’s Ethics that there is “no purer and loftier morality... ; the eternal truth is man’s sole purpose for his actions.” In Book II of his Ethics, Spinoza introduces the notion of ideas as active concepts rather than passive perceptions (at conceptus actionem mentis exprimere videtur) and ties these active ideas to man’s free will (libera voluntas).

In a letter to the Austrian publisher Ludwig von Ficker, Wittgenstein writes that the meaning of his Tractatus is “ethical,” and that the work consists of two parts – a written and an unwritten one:

"My work consists of two parts: what is on hand and everything I did not write. And it is precisely this second part that is most important. The Ethical is quasi defined from within by my book."

Style endows language and art with authenticity: it gives them an authentic voice, grounds them in life. For Klein, as for Wittgenstein, the work consists of two parts: one is materialized in the pigment; the other is immaterial, lived, or enacted in performances. Style is not a fashioning of power to attain a desired end but an ethical practice: to exist as a living work of art[.]


Yves Klein By Himself
Yves Klein By Himself
Yves Klein By Himself
Yves Klein By Himself
Yves Klein By Himself
Yves Klein By Himself
Yves Klein By Himself
Yves Klein By Himself

Yves Klein By Himself

Yves Klein By Himself

EDITIONS DILECTA
Hbk, 4.5 x 7.5 in. / 440 pgs.





ARTBOOK LOGO
 
 

the art world's source for books on art & culture

  

CUSTOMER SERVICE
orders@artbook.com
212 627 1999
M-F 9-5 EST

TRADE ACCOUNTS

800 338 2665

CONTACT

JOBS + INTERNSHIPS

NEW YORK
Showroom by Appointment Only
75 Broad Street, Suite 630
New York NY 10004
Tel   212 627 1999

LOS ANGELES
Showroom by Appointment Only
818 S. Broadway, Suite 700
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Tel. 323 969 8985

ARTBOOK LLC
D.A.P. | Distributed Art Publishers, Inc.


All site content Copyright C 2000-2017 by Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. and the respective publishers, authors, artists. For reproduction permissions, contact the copyright holders.

ARTBOOK AMPERSAT

The D.A.P. Catalog
www.artbook.com