ARTBOOK LOGO

ARTBOOK BLOG

WHAT'S NEW?
EVENTS
BOOKS IN THE MEDIA
AT FIRST SIGHT
FEATURED IMAGES
EX LIBRIS
ARTBOOK INTERVIEWS
EXCERPTS & ESSAYS
FROM THE SHELVES

RECENT POSTS

DATE 4/3/2015

James Mollison: Playground

DATE 3/30/2015

Jacob Lawrence: The Migration Series

DATE 3/29/2015

Jacob Lawrence: The Migration Series

DATE 3/28/2015

Jacob Lawrence: The Migration Series

DATE 3/27/2015

Christo and Jeanne-Claude: In/Out Studio Launch at 192 Books

DATE 3/26/2015

Pedro Reyes: The Permanent Revolution

DATE 3/25/2015

The Birth of Rock and Roll

DATE 3/25/2015

Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian: Cosmic Geometry

DATE 3/24/2015

Victor Moscoso: Psychedelic Drawings 1967-1982

DATE 3/22/2015

Masao Yamamoto: Small Things in Silence

DATE 3/20/2015

Victor Moscoso: Psychedelic Drawings Reviewed in NY Times

DATE 3/20/2015

Mujercitos!

DATE 3/20/2015

The Forever Now

DATE 3/19/2015

Robert Adams: A Road Through Shore Pine

DATE 3/18/2015

Yves Saint Laurent's Studio: Mirror and Secrets

DATE 3/17/2015

Olaf Otto Becker: Reading the Landscape

DATE 3/14/2015

Modern Times: The Age of Photography

DATE 3/13/2015

Cameron: Songs for the Witch Woman

DATE 3/13/2015

Thomas Ruff: Editions 1988–2014

DATE 3/12/2015

Laurie Simmons

DATE 3/10/2015

David Wojnarowicz: Brush Fires in the Social Landscape

DATE 3/10/2015

Ken Schles: Night Walk

DATE 3/9/2015

ARTBOOK INTERVIEW: Badlands' 'New Lovers' Erotica Author Wednesday Black

DATE 3/8/2015

Marlene Dumas: Sweet Nothings

DATE 3/7/2015

Albert Maysles: 1926-2015

DATE 3/6/2015

Vern Blosum

DATE 3/5/2015

ARTBOOK, Swiss Institute & DIS Magazine Launch #artselfie

DATE 3/5/2015

Sturtevant: Drawing Double Reversal

DATE 3/3/2015

Björk

DATE 3/3/2015

ARTBOOK | D.A.P. Congratulates Paul Chan, Winner of the 2014 Hugo Boss Prize and More!

DATE 3/2/2015

Tomma Abts: Mainly Drawings

DATE 3/2/2015

Shirana Shahbazi: Monstera

DATE 3/1/2015

Christo and Jeanne-Claude: In/Out Studio

DATE 3/1/2015

James Mollison: Playground

DATE 2/28/2015

Man Ray: Human Equations

DATE 2/27/2015

On Kawara — Silence

DATE 2/26/2015

Christina Ramberg: Corset Urns & Other Inventions

DATE 2/24/2015

Hubert de Givenchy

DATE 2/23/2015

Swedish Details

DATE 2/23/2015

Art Books Continue to Insist on Being Committed to Print

DATE 2/22/2015

AIGA Presents Louise Sandhaus, Barbara Glauber, Lucille Tenazaas & Alexandra Lange on 'California Graphic Design'

DATE 2/19/2015

Jacqueline Humphries

DATE 2/19/2015

The Art of Smallfilms

DATE 2/18/2015

Making Design

DATE 2/17/2015

Arctic

DATE 2/17/2015

Peter Fischli & Nancy Spector in Conversation at the Swiss Institute

DATE 2/15/2015

Studio 54

DATE 2/15/2015

Titian

DATE 2/14/2015

STEIDL at Privet Lives

DATE 2/14/2015

Sweets for the Sweet

DATE 2/13/2015

Making Pictures: Three for a Dime


BOOKS IN THE MEDIA

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 10/4/2012

Home Sweet Architectural Masterpiece: Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies Featured in The New York Times


In today's New York Times (Home Section), Alexandra Lange interviews Lafayette Park resident Jacqueline Neal on her experience living in Mies van der Rohe's Detroit architectural masterpiece, as detailed in the new METROPOLIS book.

HOME SWEET ARCHITECTURAL MASTERPIECE
by Alexandra Lange
Lafayette Park in Detroit consists of three high-rises, 24 single-story courthouses and 162 two-story town houses, completed in the early 1960s. It was an urban renewal project built on land that was once a working-class black neighborhood. It was designed by one of the 20th century’s most famous modern architects, Mies van der Rohe. 
All these elements have spelled disaster in other cities, and yet Lafayette Park has been a success, with high occupancy rates, a racially diverse population and a strong commitment to maintaining Mies’s architecture. 
In their new book, Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies: Lafayette Park, Detroit, which is due out at the end of the month (Metropolis Books, $29.95), the editors Danielle Aubert, Lana Cavar and Natasha Chandani, graphic designers all, offer a portrait of Lafayette Park very different from the classic Mies monograph.
Contents include interviews with residents of Lafayette Park’s towers and town houses; archival materials from the complex’s history; an account of nine days spent trying to climate-control a corner apartment; and essays on Mies in Detroit, the Lafayette Park landscape, bird-watching and a record of bird-strike deaths (birds and plate glass don’t mix). 
At-home portraits of residents by Corine Vermeulen show Mies’s architecture as a strong frame for personal expression. Some homes look like shrines to 1958, while others reflect the lived-in décor of decades. Jacqueline Neal, an interior designer and 12-year resident of the Pavilion, the smallest of the complex’s three towers, spoke last month about living and accessorizing with Mies. 

What kind of interior design do you do?

For the past 17 years, I have been doing commercial design, corporate offices, working for C.E.O.’s. But the commercial industry has not come back as quickly as residential furniture. Residential is not difficult for a designer.

How did you come to live at Lafayette Park?

I went to college at Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids, Mich. When I came back to Detroit, I kind of stumbled upon it. What drew me to the building was the ambience of the space when I would come by at night. When you drive down Rivard, you pass the town houses, and it gives you that serene feeling. Then you pull in and see the doorman at the Pavilion. When I finally came in and they gave me the brochure, I said, “I studied this guy in college.”

Design-wise, what do you like about the Pavilion?

I like the floors and the green marble walls in the lobby that are accented with chrome trim and chrome elevator doors. The housekeeping staff does an excellent job in maintaining the space. The floors are always done. Everything is original. When you invest in quality, you do get what you pay for. That’s a sad thing a lot of people don’t understand or appreciate.

What about Mies’s furniture?

That is not my style at all, no, uh-uh. It is sterile. When it comes to the furniture like that, to sit on it long-term, it doesn’t quite work for me. Would you really entertain in that living room? They have Mies chairs in the lobby of the Pavilion. They aren’t leather but they have that leather look. They are there with the glass table and the chrome.

So what is your taste like?

My taste is contemporary, classy and elegant. I am going to use a street term, not that I am a bougie woman by any stretch of the imagination, but I like quality things.

How big is your apartment?

This is a studio I have divided up. I want to say it is 600 square feet. I decided I was going to create my space to be like an elegant hotel suite. The green wall is the area designated for the bedroom, then I have a conversational grouping, then I have my office. I did put different shades of green on a lot of different walls, but I didn’t paint everything, because that would close up the space. Plus I know when I get ready to leave, I will have to paint all this back.

Why so much green?

About eight years ago in commercial environments, sage was really popular. I decided this was a color I can incorporate. Then I introduced aubergine. Those are my two foundational colors. I swap out chocolate or mint green, but never lose the sage.

You sound like you love decorating. What was the last thing you bought?

I just bought a huge sage and chocolate plate. And pillows. I love pillows. In fact, when I came in, the doorman said, “More pillows?” I got upstairs at 9:30 or quarter to ten, I wound down for a little bit, and then I had to do my little decorating. I could not wait for morning. It is all about the details.  Home Sweet Architectural Masterpiece: Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies Featured in The New York Times

HOME SWEET ARCHITECTURAL MASTERPIECE
by Alexandra Lange

Lafayette Park in Detroit consists of three high-rises, 24 single-story courthouses and 162 two-story town houses, completed in the early 1960s. It was an urban renewal project built on land that was once a working-class black neighborhood. It was designed by one of the 20th century’s most famous modern architects, Mies van der Rohe.

All these elements have spelled disaster in other cities, and yet Lafayette Park has been a success, with high occupancy rates, a racially diverse population and a strong commitment to maintaining Mies’s architecture.

In their new book, Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies: Lafayette Park, Detroit, which is due out at the end of the month (Metropolis Books, $29.95), the editors Danielle Aubert, Lana Cavar and Natasha Chandani, graphic designers all, offer a portrait of Lafayette Park very different from the classic Mies monograph.

Contents include interviews with residents of Lafayette Park’s towers and town houses; archival materials from the complex’s history; an account of nine days spent trying to climate-control a corner apartment; and essays on Mies in Detroit, the Lafayette Park landscape, bird-watching and a record of bird-strike deaths (birds and plate glass don’t mix).

At-home portraits of residents by Corine Vermeulen show Mies’s architecture as a strong frame for personal expression. Some homes look like shrines to 1958, while others reflect the lived-in décor of decades. Jacqueline Neal, an interior designer and 12-year resident of the Pavilion, the smallest of the complex’s three towers, spoke last month about living and accessorizing with Mies.


What kind of interior design do you do?


For the past 17 years, I have been doing commercial design, corporate offices, working for C.E.O.’s. But the commercial industry has not come back as quickly as residential furniture. Residential is not difficult for a designer.

How did you come to live at Lafayette Park?

I went to college at Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids, Mich. When I came back to Detroit, I kind of stumbled upon it. What drew me to the building was the ambience of the space when I would come by at night. When you drive down Rivard, you pass the town houses, and it gives you that serene feeling. Then you pull in and see the doorman at the Pavilion. When I finally came in and they gave me the brochure, I said, “I studied this guy in college.”

Design-wise, what do you like about the Pavilion?

I like the floors and the green marble walls in the lobby that are accented with chrome trim and chrome elevator doors. The housekeeping staff does an excellent job in maintaining the space. The floors are always done. Everything is original. When you invest in quality, you do get what you pay for. That’s a sad thing a lot of people don’t understand or appreciate.

What about Mies’s furniture?

That is not my style at all, no, uh-uh. It is sterile. When it comes to the furniture like that, to sit on it long-term, it doesn’t quite work for me. Would you really entertain in that living room? They have Mies chairs in the lobby of the Pavilion. They aren’t leather but they have that leather look. They are there with the glass table and the chrome.

So what is your taste like?

My taste is contemporary, classy and elegant. I am going to use a street term, not that I am a bougie woman by any stretch of the imagination, but I like quality things.

How big is your apartment?

This is a studio I have divided up. I want to say it is 600 square feet. I decided I was going to create my space to be like an elegant hotel suite. The green wall is the area designated for the bedroom, then I have a conversational grouping, then I have my office. I did put different shades of green on a lot of different walls, but I didn’t paint everything, because that would close up the space. Plus I know when I get ready to leave, I will have to paint all this back.

Why so much green?

About eight years ago in commercial environments, sage was really popular. I decided this was a color I can incorporate. Then I introduced aubergine. Those are my two foundational colors. I swap out chocolate or mint green, but never lose the sage.

You sound like you love decorating. What was the last thing you bought?

I just bought a huge sage and chocolate plate. And pillows. I love pillows. In fact, when I came in, the doorman said, “More pillows?” I got upstairs at 9:30 or quarter to ten, I wound down for a little bit, and then I had to do my little decorating. I could not wait for morning. It is all about the details.


Home Sweet Architectural Masterpiece: Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies Featured in The New York Times
Home Sweet Architectural Masterpiece: Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies Featured in The New York Times
Home Sweet Architectural Masterpiece: Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies Featured in The New York Times
Home Sweet Architectural Masterpiece: Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies Featured in The New York Times
Home Sweet Architectural Masterpiece: Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies Featured in The New York Times
Home Sweet Architectural Masterpiece: Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies Featured in The New York Times
Home Sweet Architectural Masterpiece: Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies Featured in The New York Times

Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies

Thanks for the View, Mr. Mies

METROPOLIS BOOKS
Pbk, 6.5 x 9.5 in. / 288 pgs / illustrated throughout.

$29.95  free shipping

DATE 3/11/2013

Mariana Cook: Justice

Mariana Cook: Justice


ARTBOOK LOGO
 
 

the artworld's favorite source for books on art and culture

  

CUSTOMER SERVICE
orders@artbook.com
212 627 1999
M-F 9-5 EST

TRADE ACCOUNTS

800 338 2665

CONTACT

JOBS + INTERNSHIPS

NEW YORK
Showroom by Appointment Only
155 Sixth Avenue
New York NY 10013
Tel   212 627 1999

LOS ANGELES
Showroom by Appointment Only
818 S. Broadway, Suite 700
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Tel. 323 969 8985

ARTBOOK LLC
D.A.P. | Distributed Art Publishers, Inc.


All site content Copyright C 2000-2013 by Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. and the respective publishers, authors, artists. For reproduction permissions, contact the copyright holders.

ARTBOOK AMPERSAT

The D.A.P. Catalog
www.artbook.com