DATE 3/30/2018

Inscrutable and disorienting: Rineke Dijkstra

DATE 3/29/2018

'Ice Cream Headaches' launch event at Pilgrim Surf

DATE 3/25/2018

Modern Women, Greta von Nessen

DATE 3/24/2018

Modern Women, going, going, strong

DATE 3/22/2018

Celebrate Women's History Month with 'Women in Trees'

DATE 3/21/2018

Delight, desire, surprise and trust: Design Is Storytelling

DATE 3/21/2018

Artbook @ MoMA PS1 and Mississippi Records launch 'Dead Moon: The Book' in the MoMA PS1 Book Space

DATE 3/21/2018

Mitch Epstein signing 'Rocks and Clouds' at Dashwood

DATE 3/20/2018

Alphonse Mucha was both the 'greatest decorative artist in the world' and a humanitarian philosopher

DATE 3/19/2018

A visual language meant to express beauty in 'Alphonse Mucha'

DATE 3/18/2018

BACK IN STOCK! Mina Stone: Cooking for Artists

DATE 3/17/2018

Celebrate St. Patrick's Day with a little Belfast Punk

DATE 3/16/2018

What is 'The Sausage of the Future'?

DATE 3/15/2018

The enigmatic, unreadable writings of Mirtha Dermisache

DATE 3/14/2018

Joyce J. Scott: "I skirt the borders between comedy, pathos, delight, and horror"

DATE 3/13/2018

Bringing boundless joy: Anna Zemánková

DATE 3/12/2018

Weird and beautiful: Anna Zemánková

DATE 3/11/2018

Singular, odd and inspiring: Danh Vo: Take My Breath Away

DATE 3/10/2018

Subversive, even scandalous: Francis Picabia: Littérature

DATE 3/10/2018

Mojos, mandalas and divining tools: Chris Martin

DATE 3/9/2018

Provocateurs of the human body in 'Klimt and Schiele: Drawings'

DATE 3/8/2018

Celebrate International Women's Day… 1975 to now!

DATE 3/7/2018

Celebrate Women's History Month with Marina Abramovic's rendition of 'The Ugly Duckling'

DATE 3/6/2018

Watch the Video Trailer for "Johnny Cash at Folsom and San Quentin: Photographs by Jim Marshall"

DATE 3/6/2018

René Magritte: The Revealing Image

DATE 3/5/2018

Chris Martin book launch at Spoonbill Studio

DATE 3/5/2018

Private entertainments or public show? Frida Kahlo: Her Photos

DATE 3/5/2018

SOM to launch 'The Future of Public Space' at the Strand

DATE 3/4/2018

Frida Kahlo's life in photographs

DATE 3/2/2018

Sheila Hicks: Knotting, wrapping, folding, twisting and stacking wool, linen, cotton and more

DATE 3/2/2018

The warp and weft of poetics in 'Sheila Hicks: Lifelines'

DATE 3/1/2018

Celebrate Women's History with brand new release, 'Sheila Hicks: Lifelines'

DATE 3/1/2018

Recommended Reading: Women's History Month

DATE 2/28/2018

In 'Ellen Gallagher: Accidental Records' radical aesthetic possibilities emerge from seismic cracks in the surface of things

DATE 2/28/2018

Robert Storr and Francesca Pietropaolo in conversation about 'Interviews on Art' at 192 Books

DATE 2/28/2018

Amy Sillman book event and 'Scarlet Street' screening at Metrograph

DATE 2/28/2018

'Entanglements: Plans and Accidents' at the Artbook @ MoMA PS1 Book Space

DATE 2/27/2018

Jack Whitten and the rock-bottom meaning of universality

DATE 2/27/2018

Brian Blomerth's 'XAK'S WAX' zine launch at MoMA PS1 Book Space

DATE 2/26/2018

Black History as told through 'Black Dolls'

DATE 2/25/2018

Unsentimental Wonder: Hilton Als on Alice Neel

DATE 2/24/2018

Boom boxes, break dancing and the Salsa King: Black History from Jamel Shabazz

DATE 2/23/2018

Readings in Criticism with 'unbag' at the MoMA PS1 Book Space

DATE 2/23/2018

The meaning of color, both racial and painterly

DATE 2/22/2018

Swept up by a feeling of awe: Shinique Smith in 'Four Generations'

DATE 2/20/2018

Four Generations of 'Solidary & Solitary' work by artists of African descent

DATE 2/20/2018

Celebrate 60 years of Gerald Holtom's Peace Symbol with 'Jim Marshall: Peace'

DATE 2/19/2018

Reclaiming Images of Black Women in 'Beyond Mammy, Jezebel & Sapphire'

DATE 2/19/2018

Symbols that call us into being: 'Beyond Mammy, Jezebel & Sapphire'

DATE 2/17/2018

Celebrate Black History with Mark Bradford

DATE 2/16/2018

Christian Wassmann book launch at Spoonbill Studio



L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer

In today's New York Observer, Andrew Russeth calls L.A. Object & David Hammons Body Prints, "a magisterial new volume on African-American artists in Los Angeles." He rightfully describes this 424-page, fully illustrated but scholarly volume as both a "beauty" and a "deeply unsettling read." Below is an excerpt of Russeth's glowing review:

L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer
Elliot Pinkney, Dale Davis, John Outterbridge and Nate Fearson installing "Oh Speak, Speak, 1971.

“Until 30 years ago, it was routine practice to keep contemporary art and ‘ethnic’ art in separate categories,” New York Times art critic Holland Cotter wrote in a recent review of Hunter Drohojowska-Philp’s history of the contemporary art scene in 1960s L.A., Rebels in Paradise: The Los Angeles Art Scene and the 1960s. Mr. Cotter continued, “Those days are over, or should be, but they linger on in this book, which ignores entire cultures while meticulously cataloging the marital mishaps and bad-boy pranks of a few Establishment ‘rebels.’”
Aiming to provide a counterbalance, Mr. Cotter pointed to L.A. Object & David Hammons Body Prints, a magisterial new volume on African-American artists in Los Angeles that has just been published by the Tilton Gallery.
The book is a beauty. It is also, for a writer whose knowledge of the L.A. scene has long revolved around a superficial knowledge of the activities of the era’s storied Ferus Gallery (which held shows with emerging stars like Ed Keinholz, Andy Warhol and Ed Ruscha), a deeply unsettling read.

L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer
Senga Nengudi and Maren Hassinger before "R.S.V.P. performance at Pearl C. Wood Gallery, May 1977.

In the catalogue’s lead-off essay, scholar Kellie Jones presents a succinct overview of the city’s African-American art scene, beginning in the 1960s, which centered on spaces like the Watts Towers Arts Center, Gallery 32 and the Brockman Gallery, and activist groups like the Black Art Council, which successfully lobbied to show black artists at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
There is, throughout Ms. Jones’s essay and the book as a whole, voluminous documentation of work by major artists who still rarely figure in most histories of American postwar art, like Betye Saar, who made intricate figurative drawings on covered glass windows; Senga Nengundi, who was conjuring unusual forms from sand and pantyhose before Ernesto Neto was even a teenager; and John Outterbridge, whose multifarious assemblages took on a gamut of styles. Also here are John Riddle, George Herms, Greg Pitts, Daniel LaRue Johnson, Joe Ray and Timothy Washington, to name a few more.

L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer
"66 Signs of Neon" installation.

Occasionally, contemporary events intercede in the story. Following the Aug. 1965 Watts Riots, which resulted in more than 30 deaths, thousands of arrests and the destruction of hundreds of buildings, artists Noah Purifoy and Judson Powell invited artists to create assemblages from the wreckage for an exhibition called “66 Signs of Neon,” which traveled to museums across the U.S. and to Berlin. Like their white contemporaries, many of the artists in “66 Signs of Neon,” scholar Yael Lipschutz notes in another essay, were channeling the examples of artists like Marcel Duchamp and Kurt Schwitters. In a peculiar coda, in 1972, Purifoy decided to throw out many of the works from “66 Signs,” after they had been sitting on his lawn for some time.

L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer
David Hammons making body prints, Slauson Avenue studio, Los Angeles, 1974.

The career and art of Mr. Hammons, who emerged as the star–and the most commercially successful–member of the scene, is charted in the greatest detail. Tobias Wofford discusses the repeating appearances of spades in the artist’s work and hones in on his body prints, which involved oiling his body with margarine and pressing it against paper. (L.A. Object, which is filled with photos, includes an image of a white TV reporter removing his Channel 7 blazer and baring his upper body to make a print as the cameras and Mr. Hammons look on.)
And we also get a peek into Mr. Hammons’s early years from a variety of writers, who recall his ephemeral performances and some of the reclusive antics that would become his trademark when he moved to New York in the late 1970s.

-Excerpt is from Andrew Russeth's September 15, 2011 review, New Books on Christopher D’Arcangelo and African-American Artists in Los Angeles. All images are reproduced from L.A. Object & David Hammons Body Prints

L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer
L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer
L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer
L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer

L.A. Object & David Hammons Body Prints

L.A. Object & David Hammons Body Prints

Hbk, 10.5 x 10 in. / 424 pgs / 249 color / 252 b&w.

$65.00  free shipping


the art world's source for books on art & culture


212 627 1999
M-F 9-5 EST


800 338 2665



Showroom by Appointment Only
75 Broad Street, Suite 630
New York NY 10004
Tel   212 627 1999

Showroom by Appointment Only
818 S. Broadway, Suite 700
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Tel. 323 969 8985

D.A.P. | Distributed Art Publishers, Inc.

All site content Copyright C 2000-2017 by Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. and the respective publishers, authors, artists. For reproduction permissions, contact the copyright holders.


The D.A.P. Catalog