ARTBOOK LOGO

ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 2/19/2016

Edvard Munch: Archetypes, The Day After

DATE 2/18/2016

Muse: Mickalene Thomas, Le Dejeuner Sur l'herbe les Trois Femmes Noires

DATE 2/17/2016

SURF'S UP! Two California Events for Joni Sternbach: Surf Site Tin Type

DATE 2/17/2016

Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs, Don't Forget About Me (Keri)

DATE 2/16/2016

The Sun Went to Their Heads: Louise Sandhaus to Lecture on California, Graphic Design & Modernism during Palm Springs Modernism Week

DATE 2/16/2016

Muse: Mickalene Thomas, Sandra: She's a Beauty #2

DATE 2/15/2016

The Photographs of Abraham Lincoln

DATE 2/14/2016

Love Stories

DATE 2/14/2016

Private Collection: A History of Erotic Photography, 1850–1940

DATE 2/13/2016

Sarah Cain: The Imaginary Architecture of Love, Bow Down

DATE 2/12/2016

Shannon Ebner: Auto Body Collision

DATE 2/12/2016

ARTBOOK to Open a Contemporary Art Bookstore at Hauser Wirth & Schimmel

DATE 2/11/2016

Santu Mofokeng: Stories No. 1: Train Church

DATE 2/10/2016

Beauty: Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial, Vlisco textiles

DATE 2/10/2016

Lookin' Good

DATE 2/10/2016

Congratulations Badlands Unlimited: New Offices, New Flagship Outlet!

DATE 2/9/2016

William Eggleston: The Democratic Forest, Bottles on Table

DATE 2/8/2016

William Eggleston: The Democratic Forest

DATE 2/7/2016

William Eggleston: The Democratic Forest, Gulf Transport bus

DATE 2/6/2016

Art Brut in America: The Incursion of Jean Dubuffet, Gaston Duf

DATE 2/5/2016

BACK IN STOCK! Maude Schuyler Clay: Mississippi History, Anna as Heidi

DATE 2/4/2016

Kerry James Marshall: Look See, Untitled (Rapunzel)

DATE 2/3/2016

NEW! The Artist as Curator: Collaborative Initiatives in the International Zero Movement 1957-1967, Margret Mack, Heinz Mack, Otto Piene, Jean Tinguely, Daniel Spoerri, Pol Bury, Yves Klein and Emmett Williams after the opening of Vision in Motion

DATE 2/2/2016

Christine Osinski: Summer Days Staten Island, kids hanging out by car

DATE 2/1/2016

Join ARTBOOK | D.A.P. at the 2016 CAA Conference

DATE 2/1/2016

Joel Meyerowitz: Morandi's Objects, Flowers in Vase

DATE 2//2016

Visit ARTBOOK at the LAABF 2016!

DATE 1/31/2016

Ed Ruscha: Los Angeles Apartments

DATE 1/30/2016

Suzan Frecon: Oil Paintings and Sun, Dark Red Cathedral

DATE 1/29/2016

Jack Pierson: onthisisland

DATE 1/28/2016

Robert Frank: In America

DATE 1/27/2016

Books & Films by Robert Frank

DATE 1/27/2016

Sue Williams, It's a Man's World

DATE 1/26/2016

BACK IN STOCK! Guy Bourdin: Polaroids

DATE 1/25/2016

The Haas Brothers & Liza Lou at Art Catalogues, LACMA

DATE 1/25/2016

Cooking from the CCCP COOK BOOK

DATE 1/25/2016

Saul Leiter: Early Black and White

DATE 1/24/2016

The Haas Brothers: Afreaks

DATE 1/23/2016

Brad Cloepfil / Allied Works Architecture: Case Work, Wisconsin Art Preserve

DATE 1/22/2016

HISTORIC: Robert Frank & Gerhard Steidl in Conversation

DATE 1/22/2016

Brad Cloepfil / Allied Works Architecture: Case Work, National Music Centre of Canada

DATE 1/21/2016

Hairy Who & The Chicago Imagists

DATE 1/21/2016

Exquisite: Gerhard Richter: Atlas, Limited Edition

DATE 1/19/2016

Charlotte Dumas: Work Horse

DATE 1/19/2016

Chris Killip: Pirelli Work

DATE 1/18/2016

Gordon Parks: Segregation Story

DATE 1/17/2016

Hiroji Kubota: Photographer, March on Washington

DATE 1/16/2016

BACK IN STOCK! Henry Taylor

DATE 1/16/2016

New & Forthcoming Books by Gordon Parks

DATE 1/15/2016

Best of 2016: Dan Nadel Shares his Forthcoming Favorites

DATE 1/15/2016

Erica Baum: The Naked Eye, untitled woman


BOOKS IN THE MEDIA

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 9/15/2011

L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer

In today's New York Observer, Andrew Russeth calls L.A. Object & David Hammons Body Prints, "a magisterial new volume on African-American artists in Los Angeles." He rightfully describes this 424-page, fully illustrated but scholarly volume as both a "beauty" and a "deeply unsettling read." Below is an excerpt of Russeth's glowing review:


L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer
Elliot Pinkney, Dale Davis, John Outterbridge and Nate Fearson installing "Oh Speak, Speak, 1971.

“Until 30 years ago, it was routine practice to keep contemporary art and ‘ethnic’ art in separate categories,” New York Times art critic Holland Cotter wrote in a recent review of Hunter Drohojowska-Philp’s history of the contemporary art scene in 1960s L.A., Rebels in Paradise: The Los Angeles Art Scene and the 1960s. Mr. Cotter continued, “Those days are over, or should be, but they linger on in this book, which ignores entire cultures while meticulously cataloging the marital mishaps and bad-boy pranks of a few Establishment ‘rebels.’”
Aiming to provide a counterbalance, Mr. Cotter pointed to L.A. Object & David Hammons Body Prints, a magisterial new volume on African-American artists in Los Angeles that has just been published by the Tilton Gallery.
The book is a beauty. It is also, for a writer whose knowledge of the L.A. scene has long revolved around a superficial knowledge of the activities of the era’s storied Ferus Gallery (which held shows with emerging stars like Ed Keinholz, Andy Warhol and Ed Ruscha), a deeply unsettling read.

L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer
Senga Nengudi and Maren Hassinger before "R.S.V.P. performance at Pearl C. Wood Gallery, May 1977.

In the catalogue’s lead-off essay, scholar Kellie Jones presents a succinct overview of the city’s African-American art scene, beginning in the 1960s, which centered on spaces like the Watts Towers Arts Center, Gallery 32 and the Brockman Gallery, and activist groups like the Black Art Council, which successfully lobbied to show black artists at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
There is, throughout Ms. Jones’s essay and the book as a whole, voluminous documentation of work by major artists who still rarely figure in most histories of American postwar art, like Betye Saar, who made intricate figurative drawings on covered glass windows; Senga Nengundi, who was conjuring unusual forms from sand and pantyhose before Ernesto Neto was even a teenager; and John Outterbridge, whose multifarious assemblages took on a gamut of styles. Also here are John Riddle, George Herms, Greg Pitts, Daniel LaRue Johnson, Joe Ray and Timothy Washington, to name a few more.

L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer
"66 Signs of Neon" installation.

Occasionally, contemporary events intercede in the story. Following the Aug. 1965 Watts Riots, which resulted in more than 30 deaths, thousands of arrests and the destruction of hundreds of buildings, artists Noah Purifoy and Judson Powell invited artists to create assemblages from the wreckage for an exhibition called “66 Signs of Neon,” which traveled to museums across the U.S. and to Berlin. Like their white contemporaries, many of the artists in “66 Signs of Neon,” scholar Yael Lipschutz notes in another essay, were channeling the examples of artists like Marcel Duchamp and Kurt Schwitters. In a peculiar coda, in 1972, Purifoy decided to throw out many of the works from “66 Signs,” after they had been sitting on his lawn for some time.

L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer
David Hammons making body prints, Slauson Avenue studio, Los Angeles, 1974.

The career and art of Mr. Hammons, who emerged as the star–and the most commercially successful–member of the scene, is charted in the greatest detail. Tobias Wofford discusses the repeating appearances of spades in the artist’s work and hones in on his body prints, which involved oiling his body with margarine and pressing it against paper. (L.A. Object, which is filled with photos, includes an image of a white TV reporter removing his Channel 7 blazer and baring his upper body to make a print as the cameras and Mr. Hammons look on.)
And we also get a peek into Mr. Hammons’s early years from a variety of writers, who recall his ephemeral performances and some of the reclusive antics that would become his trademark when he moved to New York in the late 1970s.

-Excerpt is from Andrew Russeth's September 15, 2011 review, New Books on Christopher D’Arcangelo and African-American Artists in Los Angeles. All images are reproduced from L.A. Object & David Hammons Body Prints

L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer
L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer
L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer
L.A. Object Reviewed in The New York Observer

L.A. Object & David Hammons Body Prints

L.A. Object & David Hammons Body Prints

TILTON GALLERY
Hbk, 10.5 x 10 in. / 424 pgs / 249 color / 252 b&w.

$65.00  free shipping



ARTBOOK LOGO
 
 

the art world's source for books on art & culture

  

CUSTOMER SERVICE
orders@artbook.com
212 627 1999
M-F 9-5 EST

TRADE ACCOUNTS

800 338 2665

CONTACT

JOBS + INTERNSHIPS

NEW YORK
Showroom by Appointment Only
155 Sixth Avenue
New York NY 10013
Tel   212 627 1999

LOS ANGELES
Showroom by Appointment Only
818 S. Broadway, Suite 700
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Tel. 323 969 8985

ARTBOOK LLC
D.A.P. | Distributed Art Publishers, Inc.


All site content Copyright C 2000-2013 by Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. and the respective publishers, authors, artists. For reproduction permissions, contact the copyright holders.

ARTBOOK AMPERSAT

The D.A.P. Catalog
www.artbook.com