DATE 3/30/2018

Inscrutable and disorienting: Rineke Dijkstra

DATE 3/29/2018

'Ice Cream Headaches' launch event at Pilgrim Surf

DATE 3/25/2018

Modern Women, Greta von Nessen

DATE 3/24/2018

Modern Women, going, going, strong

DATE 3/22/2018

Celebrate Women's History Month with 'Women in Trees'

DATE 3/21/2018

Delight, desire, surprise and trust: Design Is Storytelling

DATE 3/21/2018

Artbook @ MoMA PS1 and Mississippi Records launch 'Dead Moon: The Book' in the MoMA PS1 Book Space

DATE 3/21/2018

Mitch Epstein signing 'Rocks and Clouds' at Dashwood

DATE 3/20/2018

Alphonse Mucha was both the 'greatest decorative artist in the world' and a humanitarian philosopher

DATE 3/19/2018

A visual language meant to express beauty in 'Alphonse Mucha'

DATE 3/18/2018

BACK IN STOCK! Mina Stone: Cooking for Artists

DATE 3/17/2018

Celebrate St. Patrick's Day with a little Belfast Punk

DATE 3/16/2018

What is 'The Sausage of the Future'?

DATE 3/15/2018

The enigmatic, unreadable writings of Mirtha Dermisache

DATE 3/14/2018

Joyce J. Scott: "I skirt the borders between comedy, pathos, delight, and horror"

DATE 3/13/2018

Bringing boundless joy: Anna Zemánková

DATE 3/12/2018

Weird and beautiful: Anna Zemánková

DATE 3/11/2018

Singular, odd and inspiring: Danh Vo: Take My Breath Away

DATE 3/10/2018

Subversive, even scandalous: Francis Picabia: Littérature

DATE 3/10/2018

Mojos, mandalas and divining tools: Chris Martin

DATE 3/9/2018

Provocateurs of the human body in 'Klimt and Schiele: Drawings'

DATE 3/8/2018

Celebrate International Women's Day… 1975 to now!

DATE 3/7/2018

Celebrate Women's History Month with Marina Abramovic's rendition of 'The Ugly Duckling'

DATE 3/6/2018

Watch the Video Trailer for "Johnny Cash at Folsom and San Quentin: Photographs by Jim Marshall"

DATE 3/6/2018

René Magritte: The Revealing Image

DATE 3/5/2018

Chris Martin book launch at Spoonbill Studio

DATE 3/5/2018

Private entertainments or public show? Frida Kahlo: Her Photos

DATE 3/5/2018

SOM to launch 'The Future of Public Space' at the Strand

DATE 3/4/2018

Frida Kahlo's life in photographs

DATE 3/2/2018

Sheila Hicks: Knotting, wrapping, folding, twisting and stacking wool, linen, cotton and more

DATE 3/2/2018

The warp and weft of poetics in 'Sheila Hicks: Lifelines'

DATE 3/1/2018

Celebrate Women's History with brand new release, 'Sheila Hicks: Lifelines'

DATE 3/1/2018

Recommended Reading: Women's History Month

DATE 2/28/2018

In 'Ellen Gallagher: Accidental Records' radical aesthetic possibilities emerge from seismic cracks in the surface of things

DATE 2/28/2018

Robert Storr and Francesca Pietropaolo in conversation about 'Interviews on Art' at 192 Books

DATE 2/28/2018

Amy Sillman book event and 'Scarlet Street' screening at Metrograph

DATE 2/28/2018

'Entanglements: Plans and Accidents' at the Artbook @ MoMA PS1 Book Space

DATE 2/27/2018

Jack Whitten and the rock-bottom meaning of universality

DATE 2/27/2018

Brian Blomerth's 'XAK'S WAX' zine launch at MoMA PS1 Book Space

DATE 2/26/2018

Black History as told through 'Black Dolls'

DATE 2/25/2018

Unsentimental Wonder: Hilton Als on Alice Neel

DATE 2/24/2018

Boom boxes, break dancing and the Salsa King: Black History from Jamel Shabazz

DATE 2/23/2018

Readings in Criticism with 'unbag' at the MoMA PS1 Book Space

DATE 2/23/2018

The meaning of color, both racial and painterly

DATE 2/22/2018

Swept up by a feeling of awe: Shinique Smith in 'Four Generations'

DATE 2/20/2018

Four Generations of 'Solidary & Solitary' work by artists of African descent

DATE 2/20/2018

Celebrate 60 years of Gerald Holtom's Peace Symbol with 'Jim Marshall: Peace'

DATE 2/19/2018

Reclaiming Images of Black Women in 'Beyond Mammy, Jezebel & Sapphire'

DATE 2/19/2018

Symbols that call us into being: 'Beyond Mammy, Jezebel & Sapphire'

DATE 2/17/2018

Celebrate Black History with Mark Bradford

DATE 2/16/2018

Christian Wassmann book launch at Spoonbill Studio



New York Times Features Louise Sandhaus, Author of 'Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots'

In the feature, Stoking a California Dream: Graphic Design That Encapsulates the Golden State, Alexandra Lange writes, "'It is common practice today to place the word California in front of almost any vagrant word and thus achieve a magic combination hopefully intended to make the heart jump and the purse strings fly open,' the designer Alvin Lustig wrote in 1947. But it wasn’t the word alone. Mr. Lustig and other graphic artists gave California a look, for periodicals, posters, packaging and vacation destinations, that also made the heart jump and loosened the purse strings. It was colorful, it was experimental, it was rough, it was digital. And the same can be said of the new book Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots: California Graphic Design, 1936-1986 (Metropolis Books, $55) written and designed by Louise Sandhaus, 59, a graphic designer.

New York Times Features Louise Sandhaus, Author of
Photograph by Moira Tarmy.

As she writes in her introduction, she chose not to honor text over graphics, and she wasn’t interested in being definitive. Rather, looking through archives and talking to makers, she asked questions like, 'Is this historically important work, versus is this fabulous and distinctive and sooooooo California?' The pieces in the book range in mood from the calm abstraction of John Follis’s Arts & Architecture magazine covers to the pixelated trips in David Theurer’s I, Robot Atari game. Oh, and that title? Ms. Sandhaus wrote in an email, 'It’s a cliché about California, but one that encapsulates a place where big dramatic changes happen.'

Q. You say in your introduction this project took 10 years. Why?

A. I worked for two-and-a-half years on the millennial exhibition for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Made in California. It was intended to talk about the relationship between California art and images of California, and to complicate that relationship. I saw California visual artists start to pull away from inspirations coming from Europe and from New York. Something similar had to have happened within graphic design.
I was also reading Reyner Banham’s book Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies. He said to tell the story of the built environment meant creating a different way to tell that story. That was impetus to think I didn’t have to become a historian, or to try to force this into a conventional model.

You also came up with four ecologies, presented as chapter titles: “Sunbaked Modernism,” “Industry & the Indies,” “Sixties alt Sixties” and “California Girls.” Why those?

Lorraine Wild, a graphic designer in Los Angeles, mentored this project early on, and she came up with those titles to be able to organize the work. A commonality was a left turn or a break from tradition. There was a colorfulness to the work. There was an independent spirit that was less about following and more about defining.

Ms. Wild’s essay for the ’60s chapter is all about the color orange. How does orange define California design?

Lorraine started that essay on an impulse. The sunset seems orange. The ubiquitous poster for “The Endless Summer” (1964) has that kind of luminosity. The Victor Moscoso “Neon Rose” series, the luminosity of orange in there. In public consciousness, that color does become conflated with California. We grow oranges.

Orange shows up in the architecture, too.

When I think of architecture of the period, Sea Ranch is front and center. Properties were going up that were more natural, and people were starting to introduce more earthy colors: avocado and burnt orange.

You also argue that California design was a more hospitable place for women, fostering the careers of designers including Marget Larsen for the department store Joseph Magnin and Susan Kare for the Apple Macintosh.

The women attracted to here were independently minded to begin with. But because it was a backwater, women had more latitude and developed bold work that got a lot of attention. Frank Gehry invited Deborah Sussman and Gere Kavanaugh to share his office. That said, Deborah Sussman, who died earlier this year, told me about how she had to assert herself in meetings and wasn’t always taken seriously.

You seem like you had fun with the design of the book. I love the pink-and-orange endpapers with little Californias and palms.

Originally I wanted there to be four books glued back to back, to suggest other books to come. This wasn’t a finished story. So the patterned papers between the chapters are like endpapers, retaining that suggestion. I had an intern this summer who did something wacky with the In-N-Out Burger palm tree.

New York Times Features Louise Sandhaus, Author of  'Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots'
New York Times Features Louise Sandhaus, Author of  'Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots'
New York Times Features Louise Sandhaus, Author of  'Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots'
New York Times Features Louise Sandhaus, Author of  'Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots'
New York Times Features Louise Sandhaus, Author of  'Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots'
New York Times Features Louise Sandhaus, Author of  'Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots'
New York Times Features Louise Sandhaus, Author of  'Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots'

Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots: California and Graphic Design, 1936-1986

Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots: California and Graphic Design, 1936-1986

Hbk, 7.5 x 10 in. / 432 pgs / 275 color.

$55.00  free shipping


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