ARTBOOK LOGO

ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 12/23/2017

A feast for the eyes: Matisse in the Studio

DATE 12/11/2017

The perfect holiday gift book for the one who doubts everything

DATE 12/9/2017

LSTW launch event at Artbook at MoMA PS1

DATE 12/9/2017

Sex Still Sells! ‘X-rated: Adult Movie Posters of the 60s and 70s’

DATE 12/7/2017

Holiday Gift Guide 2017: Stocking Stuffers

DATE 12/7/2017

Arcana presents Mega Photobook Afternoon with Mike Slack, Tim Carpenter and others

DATE 12/6/2017

Nonchalant flirting with oblivion: Ray Johnson

DATE 12/6/2017

Autophoto: an exquisite holiday gift featuring cars and photography, 1900-now

DATE 12/6/2017

Tim Carpenter and Mike Slack in conversation with Ron Jude at Ampersand

DATE 12/6/2017

LAMM presents 'twinnish' at Artbook @ MoMA PS1

DATE 12/6/2017

BACK IN STOCK! Nan Goldin: The Beautiful Smile

DATE 12/5/2017

101 Danish Design Icons: the 'perfekt' holiday gift for design lovers

DATE 12/4/2017

From the salon to the boudoir: 'Casanova: The Seduction of Europe'

DATE 12/4/2017

Holiday Gift Guide 2017: Weird and Wonderful Staff Favorites

DATE 12/4/2017

Stephen Shore signing at The Strand

DATE 12/2/2017

Visit Artbook @ Design Miami 2017

DATE 12/1/2017

Must-Have Fashion Book of 2017: The House of Dior

DATE 11/30/2017

Visit Spoonbill Studio's Snail Farm and Friends Book Fair!

DATE 11/30/2017

Visit our Design Book Pop-Up Store at Usagi NY

DATE 11/30/2017

Holiday Gift Guide 2017: New York, New York

DATE 11/30/2017

Behold, Thomas Struth

DATE 11/29/2017

Thomas Struth asks, "What are we doing here?"

DATE 11/28/2017

Going beyond in 'Items: Is Fashion Modern?'

DATE 11/27/2017

Holiday Gift Guide 2017: Rebels and Resistance!

DATE 11/27/2017

Holiday Gift Staff Pick 'Items: Is Fashion Modern?' transforms the familiar to historically significant

DATE 11/26/2017

The American Surfaces of Stephen Shore

DATE 11/25/2017

Banality and lack of artifice: Stephen Shore

DATE 11/24/2017

A seeming paradox and an American treasure: Stephen Shore

DATE 11/23/2017

Design to the Nth power: Essential Eames

DATE 11/23/2017

Holiday Gift Guide 2017: For the Bookworm - Great Reads

DATE 11/22/2017

Bold, dashing color on the table: 'Marguerita Mergentime: American Textiles, Modern Ideas'

DATE 11/21/2017

Unsentimental Wonder: Hilton Als on Alice Neel

DATE 11/20/2017

Holiday Gift Guide 2017: For the Fashion Forward

DATE 11/20/2017

SHIPPING NOW! ‘Frankenstein: The First Two Hundred Years’

DATE 11/19/2017

Always someone under the neon lights… Malick Sidibé: Mali Twist

DATE 11/19/2017

STEIDL x STRAND 2017

DATE 11/18/2017

‘Ah, Malick’s here! The photographer’s arrived.’

DATE 11/18/2017

Rizzoli presents 'Items: Is Fashion Modern?' with Paola Antonelli

DATE 11/17/2017

Moments of truth, spirited away in 'Malick Sidibé: Mali Twist'

DATE 11/16/2017

Oliver Clegg Slot Car Race & Book Launch at Artbook @ MoMA PS1

DATE 11/16/2017

Boom boxes, break dancing and the Salsa King: Jamel Shabazz's NYC Street Photographs

DATE 11/16/2017

Holiday Gift Guide 2017: Books for Him

DATE 11/15/2017

Holiday Gift staff favorite 'Josef Albers in Mexico' releases today!

DATE 11/15/2017

Jorn Weisbrodt, Rufus Wainwright, Paul Holdengraber, Karen Hopkins & Charles Renfro launch Into the Culture Cave at Artbook @ MoMA PS1

DATE 11/14/2017

Evidence of life before the art market … Club 57

DATE 11/13/2017

Holiday Gift Guide 2017: For the Design Devotee

DATE 11/12/2017

Black artist as superhero: Barkley L. Hendricks in 'Soul of a Nation'

DATE 11/10/2017

Soul of a Nation featured on the cover of November ARTFORUM

DATE 11/10/2017

Tell Me Something Good panel and launch with Phong Bui, Jonas Mekas, Shirin Neshat, Shahzia Sikander and Jack Whitten at The Strand

DATE 11/9/2017

For the Collector: Limited Editions & Catalogues Raisonnés

DATE 11/9/2017

Goddess in the Details: Ellen Lupton & Paula Scher at The Strand


AT FIRST SIGHT

THOMAS EVANS | DATE 8/11/2010

The Original Copy
Sculpture and Photography

Published for a show at The Museum of Modern Art in New York, The Original Copy proposes an intriguing corollary to Mallarmé's famous dictum that "everything in the world exists in order to end up as a book": that all sculpture exists to end up as a photograph, that this fact affords a further creative-interpretive occasion and that the photographing of sculpture constitutes its own hitherto unidentified genre within both photography and sculpture. Photography has of course proved to be the final condition of numerous lost or destroyed artworks, but here, MoMA curator Roxana Marcoci, who has conceived the book and accompanying show, describes a deeper collaboration between photography and sculpture, in which the photograph allows the sculpture to be performed and dramatized in ways that simply exhibiting the sculpture, in 'real time' and 'real space,' doesn't permit. What does this photographic 'performing of sculpture' entail? Frequently, it entails a defusion of the object's spatial neutrality (so enhanced by exhibition and museum display) into a stage that is not the world, but the world rendered as theater. Attaining this shift in object status, sculpture can then ostensibly move among the world's objects, but operating parenthetically like a toy, or a body part, or a tool enabling or collaborating with moving bodies; and perhaps more importantly, it can begin to at least invoke the atmosphere of a temporality and duration in which the object participates, recorded in the photographic instant.
The Original Copy
This collaboration dates back to the earliest days of photography, for sculpture offered an advantage over more mobile subjects--being stationary, it suited the then-lengthy exposure times of nineteenth-century technology. As a result, Marcoci notes in her introduction, "by the later nineteenth century, highlighting a sculpture's most interesting details through the use of close-ups and enlarged photographs of areas normally inaccessible to the average viewer became increasingly popular." Accordingly, the earliest images in this book are nineteenth-century dramatizations of ancient Greek, Roman and Egyptian sculpture, usually executed for museological/anthropological purposes, but already producing a new kind of two-dimensional sculptural content from three-dimension information. Pursuing this theme into the streets of Paris at the century's close is Atget as reproduced on the pages of the book above.
The case study that perhaps most usefully illuminates the scope of Marcoci's conception in The Original Copy is that of Marcel Duchamp. Almost every one of Duchamp's major works yielded some new and enlarged incarnation as a photograph, from the urinal (whose famous and dramatic depiction by Stieglitz is the sole surviving documentation of the work), to the portraits of Duchamp posing with works such as "The Bride Stripped Bare," to the reduction of his oeuvre to photographic reproduction for the "Box in a Valise," to the recording of ephemeral works such as the "Unhappy Readymade" depicted on the right:
The Original Copy
Duchamp stands at the head of a long parade of twentieth-century artists interacting with, wearing or in some way elaborating their sculptures: Giacometti (as portrayed by Cartier-Bresson), Hans Bellmer, Eva Hesse (as photographed by Herman Landshoff), Andre Cadere, Joseph Beuys, Yayoi Kusama and others. If this mini-genre can be seen as an extension of, or peek into, the character of studio practice, or an insertion of the author into the numinous field of the artwork--"I made this!"--one can also point to the curious negation of authorial hand that it effects through the artifice of performance, as everything implicated in the picture frame gets leveled to a sculptural presence. From the above rollcall of artist-performers, we might single out Eva Hesse for bringing conscious strategy to the occasion. Hesse, who commissioned and directed Landshoff's 1968 photoshoot, performs the rich implications of her sculptures as garment, as fetish and as household object, often with a warmly wicked smile that undercuts the potential authority of those implications. In fact the photographic portrayal of sculpture frequently leads to moments of humor and play: think of the slapstick of Fischli & Weiss's Equilibres sculptures, Louise Bourgeois' mischievous expression with underarm phallus in Robert Mapplethorpe's classic 1982 portrait and Erwin Wurm's One-Minute Sculptures (all of these are included here).
The Original Copy
In the example of Wurm and Fischli & Weiss, one notes that the sculpture existed only for the moment at which it was photographed: Wurm's actors presumably ceased their absurdist poses once the performance was photographed, and Fischli & Weiss' delicately balanced bric-a-brac likewise collapsed (that is, unless it was all glued into place). While the introduction of temporal determination into sculpture is not necessarily predicated upon photography's role, the viewer's heightened consciousness of the moment grasped and gone endows the photograph with a thrilling tension.
The Original Copy
The dramatization of object by artist inevitably leads to performance by/of body alone, and in photographs of Valie Export, Yves Klein and Yvonne Rainer, the pressing, casting and placing of bodies into space gains sculptural pull through photography's agency. Here again, the body as author is transmuted into a body of great plasticity, sculpting its way into space as something more than sentient but other than individual or possessed of personality.
The Original Copy
The Original Copy
The Original Copy
The Original Copy
All of these themes and others besides are indicated by the book's chapter titles, which merit listing tas an elucidation of its scope: I. Sculpture in the Age of Photography II. Eugène Atget: The Marvelous in the Everyday III. Auguste Rodin: The Sculptor and the Photographic Enterprise IV: Constantin Brancusi: The Studio as Group Mobile and the Photos Radieuse V. Marcel Duchamp's Box in a Valise: The Readymade as Reproduction VI. Cultural and Political Icons VII. The Studio Without Walls: Sculpture in the Expanded Field VIII. Daguerre's Soup: What Is Sculpture? IX. The Pygmalion Complex: Animate and Inanimate Figures X. The Performing Body as Sculptural Object The Original Copy surveys a huge range of work across these chapters, but every reader will think of further chapters and themes to add, so rich is its conceptual suggestiveness.

The Original Copy: Photography of Sculpture, 1839 to Today

The Original Copy: Photography of Sculpture, 1839 to Today

THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK
Hbk, 9.5 x 12 in. / 242 pgs / 120 color / 180 b&w.

$55.00  free shipping

DATE 8/23/2015

Xanti Schawinsky

Xanti Schawinsky

DATE 7/31/2015

Axel Hoedt

Axel Hoedt

DATE 9/11/2014

New York Is ...

New York Is ...

DATE 5/13/2014

Libuse Niklová

Libuse Niklová


ARTBOOK LOGO
 
 

the art world's source for books on art & culture

  

CUSTOMER SERVICE
orders@artbook.com
212 627 1999
M-F 9-5 EST

TRADE ACCOUNTS

800 338 2665

CONTACT

JOBS + INTERNSHIPS

NEW YORK
Showroom by Appointment Only
75 Broad Street, Suite 630
New York NY 10004
Tel   212 627 1999

LOS ANGELES
Showroom by Appointment Only
818 S. Broadway, Suite 700
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Tel. 323 969 8985

ARTBOOK LLC
D.A.P. | Distributed Art Publishers, Inc.


All site content Copyright C 2000-2017 by Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. and the respective publishers, authors, artists. For reproduction permissions, contact the copyright holders.

ARTBOOK AMPERSAT

The D.A.P. Catalog
www.artbook.com