ARTBOOK LOGO

ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 6/22/2017

Art & Beauty Magazine: Drawings by R. Crumb, Serena Williams

DATE 7/31/2016

Fire Island Modernist: Horace Gifford and the Architecture of Seduction

DATE 7/30/2016

Alexander Girard: A Designer's Universe, Braniff flight attendants

DATE 7/30/2016

Fire Island Modernist: Horace Gifford and the Architecture of Seduction

DATE 7/29/2016

Alexander Girard: A Designer's Universe, Miller House

DATE 7/26/2016

Hannah Höch: Life Portrait, A Collaged Autobiography

DATE 7/26/2016

Mary Heilmann: Looking at Pictures, Primalon Ballroom

DATE 7/25/2016

Hannah Höch: Life Portrait

DATE 7/25/2016

Mary Heilmann: Looking at Pictures, Taste of Honey

DATE 7/24/2016

Save up to 30% at the ARTBOOK @ Swiss Institute Last Day Sale!

DATE 7/23/2016

Ed Templeton: Wayward Cognitions Huntington Beach USA

DATE 7/21/2016

Separate Cinema: The First 100 Years of Black Poster Art, Josephine Baker

DATE 7/20/2016

Visit Park Life & ARTBOOK | D.A.P. at the Inaugural SF Art Book Fair

DATE 7/20/2016

The 2001 File: Harry Lange and the Design of the Landmark Science Fiction Film

DATE 7/19/2016

The 1960s: Photographed by David Hurn

DATE 7/19/2016

Billy Name, 1940-2016

DATE 7/19/2016

Wayne Koestenbaum 'Notes on Glaze' Reading & Launch at 192 Books

DATE 7/18/2016

Brigid Berlin: Polaroids

DATE 7/18/2016

WELCOME REEL ART PRESS! An Interview with Tony Nourmand

DATE 7/17/2016

Sophie Calle: True Stories, Obituary

DATE 7/16/2016

Sophie Calle: True Stories

DATE 7/16/2016

Find our books at Park Life during the inaugural SF Art Book Fair, July 22-24!

DATE 7/15/2016

Sophie Calle: True Stories

DATE 7/14/2016

Seeing Things: A Kid's Guide to Looking at Photographs by Joel Meyerowitz, Edouard Boubat Lella

DATE 7/13/2016

Seeing Things: A Kid's Guide to Looking at Photographs, Bruce Davidson

DATE 7/12/2016

June Leaf: Thought Is Infinite

DATE 7/11/2016

Gus Van Sant: Icons, Michael Pitt Last Days

DATE 7/10/2016

Gus Van Sant: Icons, River Phoenix by Bruce Weber

DATE 7/9/2016

Francis Picabia: Our Heads Are Round so Our Thoughts Can Change Direction, Women with Bulldog

DATE 7/8/2016

Francis Picabia: Our Heads Are Round so Our Thoughts Can Change Direction, Udnie

DATE 7/6/2016

Parkett 98 Launch Event with Mika Rottenberg & Nikki Columbus at Swiss Institute!

DATE 7/6/2016

Georgia O'Keeffe: Watercolors, Mountain painting No. 22 - Special

DATE 7/6/2016

Georgia O'Keeffe: Watercolors, Stieglitz portrait

DATE 7/5/2016

Georgia O'Keeffe: Watercolors, Evening Star

DATE 7/4/2016

Maude Schuyler Clay: Mississippi History, Anna and Schuyler with fireworks

DATE 7/3/2016

Cape Cod Modern, Marcel Breuer Stillman House

DATE 7/2/2016

Cape Cod Modern: Mid-Century Architecture and Community on the Outer Cape

DATE 7/1/2016

Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné

DATE 6/30/2016

Carrie Mae Weems Book Launch at the Strand

DATE 6/30/2016

Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné, Landscape near Malabata, Tangier

DATE 6/29/2016

Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné, Jet of Water

DATE 6/28/2016

Jean Tinguely: Retrospective

DATE 6/27/2016

Peter Fischli and David Weiss: Flowers and Mushrooms

DATE 6/27/2016

City of Angels

DATE 6/26/2016

Tom Bianchi: Fire Island Pines, Polaroids 1975-1983

DATE 6/26/2016

Alvin Baltrop: The Piers

DATE 6/25/2016

Jimmy DeSana: Suburban, Untitled Stockings

DATE 6/25/2016

Bettina Rheims: Gender Studies

DATE 6/24/2016

Felix Gonzalez-Torres: Billboards

DATE 6/23/2016

Greg Reynolds: Jesus Days

DATE 6/23/2016

Design Observer Announces 50 Books | 50 Covers 2015


AT FIRST SIGHT

THOMAS EVANS | DATE 8/11/2010

The Original Copy
Sculpture and Photography

Published for a show at The Museum of Modern Art in New York, The Original Copy proposes an intriguing corollary to Mallarmé's famous dictum that "everything in the world exists in order to end up as a book": that all sculpture exists to end up as a photograph, that this fact affords a further creative-interpretive occasion and that the photographing of sculpture constitutes its own hitherto unidentified genre within both photography and sculpture. Photography has of course proved to be the final condition of numerous lost or destroyed artworks, but here, MoMA curator Roxana Marcoci, who has conceived the book and accompanying show, describes a deeper collaboration between photography and sculpture, in which the photograph allows the sculpture to be performed and dramatized in ways that simply exhibiting the sculpture, in 'real time' and 'real space,' doesn't permit. What does this photographic 'performing of sculpture' entail? Frequently, it entails a defusion of the object's spatial neutrality (so enhanced by exhibition and museum display) into a stage that is not the world, but the world rendered as theater. Attaining this shift in object status, sculpture can then ostensibly move among the world's objects, but operating parenthetically like a toy, or a body part, or a tool enabling or collaborating with moving bodies; and perhaps more importantly, it can begin to at least invoke the atmosphere of a temporality and duration in which the object participates, recorded in the photographic instant.
The Original Copy
This collaboration dates back to the earliest days of photography, for sculpture offered an advantage over more mobile subjects--being stationary, it suited the then-lengthy exposure times of nineteenth-century technology. As a result, Marcoci notes in her introduction, "by the later nineteenth century, highlighting a sculpture's most interesting details through the use of close-ups and enlarged photographs of areas normally inaccessible to the average viewer became increasingly popular." Accordingly, the earliest images in this book are nineteenth-century dramatizations of ancient Greek, Roman and Egyptian sculpture, usually executed for museological/anthropological purposes, but already producing a new kind of two-dimensional sculptural content from three-dimension information. Pursuing this theme into the streets of Paris at the century's close is Atget as reproduced on the pages of the book above.
The case study that perhaps most usefully illuminates the scope of Marcoci's conception in The Original Copy is that of Marcel Duchamp. Almost every one of Duchamp's major works yielded some new and enlarged incarnation as a photograph, from the urinal (whose famous and dramatic depiction by Stieglitz is the sole surviving documentation of the work), to the portraits of Duchamp posing with works such as "The Bride Stripped Bare," to the reduction of his oeuvre to photographic reproduction for the "Box in a Valise," to the recording of ephemeral works such as the "Unhappy Readymade" depicted on the right:
The Original Copy
Duchamp stands at the head of a long parade of twentieth-century artists interacting with, wearing or in some way elaborating their sculptures: Giacometti (as portrayed by Cartier-Bresson), Hans Bellmer, Eva Hesse (as photographed by Herman Landshoff), Andre Cadere, Joseph Beuys, Yayoi Kusama and others. If this mini-genre can be seen as an extension of, or peek into, the character of studio practice, or an insertion of the author into the numinous field of the artwork--"I made this!"--one can also point to the curious negation of authorial hand that it effects through the artifice of performance, as everything implicated in the picture frame gets leveled to a sculptural presence. From the above rollcall of artist-performers, we might single out Eva Hesse for bringing conscious strategy to the occasion. Hesse, who commissioned and directed Landshoff's 1968 photoshoot, performs the rich implications of her sculptures as garment, as fetish and as household object, often with a warmly wicked smile that undercuts the potential authority of those implications. In fact the photographic portrayal of sculpture frequently leads to moments of humor and play: think of the slapstick of Fischli & Weiss's Equilibres sculptures, Louise Bourgeois' mischievous expression with underarm phallus in Robert Mapplethorpe's classic 1982 portrait and Erwin Wurm's One-Minute Sculptures (all of these are included here).
The Original Copy
In the example of Wurm and Fischli & Weiss, one notes that the sculpture existed only for the moment at which it was photographed: Wurm's actors presumably ceased their absurdist poses once the performance was photographed, and Fischli & Weiss' delicately balanced bric-a-brac likewise collapsed (that is, unless it was all glued into place). While the introduction of temporal determination into sculpture is not necessarily predicated upon photography's role, the viewer's heightened consciousness of the moment grasped and gone endows the photograph with a thrilling tension.
The Original Copy
The dramatization of object by artist inevitably leads to performance by/of body alone, and in photographs of Valie Export, Yves Klein and Yvonne Rainer, the pressing, casting and placing of bodies into space gains sculptural pull through photography's agency. Here again, the body as author is transmuted into a body of great plasticity, sculpting its way into space as something more than sentient but other than individual or possessed of personality.
The Original Copy
The Original Copy
The Original Copy
The Original Copy
All of these themes and others besides are indicated by the book's chapter titles, which merit listing tas an elucidation of its scope: I. Sculpture in the Age of Photography II. Eugène Atget: The Marvelous in the Everyday III. Auguste Rodin: The Sculptor and the Photographic Enterprise IV: Constantin Brancusi: The Studio as Group Mobile and the Photos Radieuse V. Marcel Duchamp's Box in a Valise: The Readymade as Reproduction VI. Cultural and Political Icons VII. The Studio Without Walls: Sculpture in the Expanded Field VIII. Daguerre's Soup: What Is Sculpture? IX. The Pygmalion Complex: Animate and Inanimate Figures X. The Performing Body as Sculptural Object The Original Copy surveys a huge range of work across these chapters, but every reader will think of further chapters and themes to add, so rich is its conceptual suggestiveness.

The Original Copy: Photography of Sculpture, 1839 to Today

The Original Copy: Photography of Sculpture, 1839 to Today

THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK
Hbk, 9.5 x 12 in. / 242 pgs / 120 color / 180 b&w.

$55.00  free shipping

DATE 8/23/2015

Xanti Schawinsky

Xanti Schawinsky

DATE 7/31/2015

Axel Hoedt

Axel Hoedt

DATE 9/11/2014

New York Is ...

New York Is ...

DATE 5/13/2014

Libuse Niklová

Libuse Niklová


ARTBOOK LOGO
 
 

the art world's source for books on art & culture

  

CUSTOMER SERVICE
orders@artbook.com
212 627 1999
M-F 9-5 EST

TRADE ACCOUNTS

800 338 2665

CONTACT

JOBS + INTERNSHIPS

NEW YORK
Showroom by Appointment Only
155 Sixth Avenue
New York NY 10013
Tel   212 627 1999

LOS ANGELES
Showroom by Appointment Only
818 S. Broadway, Suite 700
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Tel. 323 969 8985

ARTBOOK LLC
D.A.P. | Distributed Art Publishers, Inc.


All site content Copyright C 2000-2013 by Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. and the respective publishers, authors, artists. For reproduction permissions, contact the copyright holders.

ARTBOOK AMPERSAT

The D.A.P. Catalog
www.artbook.com