ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 6/1/2024

There's no such thing as being extra in June! Pride Month Staff Picks 2024

DATE 5/17/2024

Lee Quiñones signing at Perrotin Store New York

DATE 5/13/2024

Rizzoli Bookstore presents Tony Caramanico and Zack Raffin launching 'Montauk Surf Journals'

DATE 5/12/2024

Black Feminist World-Building in LaToya Ruby Frazier’s ‘Monuments of Solidarity’

DATE 5/10/2024

Artbook at MoMA PS1 Bookstore presents Yasmine Ostendorf-Rodríguez and Juan Ferrer on 'Let's Become Fungal!'

DATE 5/8/2024

The World of Tim Burton in rare, archival materials

DATE 5/5/2024

Artbook at Hauser & Wirth LA Bookstore presents Yasmine Ostendorf-Rodríguez and David Horvitz on 'Let's Become Fungal'

DATE 5/5/2024

Eugene Richards' eloquent new photobook documenting Green-Wood Cemetery

DATE 5/2/2024

Dan Walsh and Bob Nickas to launch 'The Process of Painting' at Paula Cooper Gallery

DATE 5/1/2024

Celebrate Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month!

DATE 5/1/2024

A new book on NYC graffiti art legend Lee Quiñones

DATE 4/30/2024

Rizzoli Bookstore presents Roger A. Deakins with James Ellis Deakins and Matthew Heineman on 'Byways'

DATE 4/30/2024

Danny Lyon at Photobook Austin


IMAGE GALLERY

"Abaporu" (1928) is reproduced from
CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 10/25/2019

Tarsila do Amaral, cannibal of Modernism

There is so much to love about this new monograph on the underrecognized Brazilian Modernist Tarsila do Amaral, we hardly know where to begin. First, of course, is the title: Cannibalizing Modernism. Second, please note the tipped-on images on both front and back covers. Next, let us acknowledge the fact that the publisher, MASP, has printed on not one, but several very nice papers. There is also the fact that Tarsila, as the artist is known in her home country, dared to blend Parisian Modernism, as ingested during her years studying with André Lhote, Albert Gleizes and Fernand Léger, with "the art of our caipiras (people from the countryside)." Finally, there is the work itself. Colorful, weird, uninhibited, original, magical. Featured image is "Abaporu" (meaning, "the man who eats), painted in 1928 for the artist's husband, Oswald de Andrade, who was inspired by it to write the Manifesto of Anthropophagy, arguing for the supremacy of Brazilian art and culture specifically because it derived from the "cannibalism" of outside influences.

Tarsila do Amaral: Cannibalizing Modernism

Tarsila do Amaral: Cannibalizing Modernism

Museu de Arte de São Paulo
Hbk, 8 x 10.75 in. / 360 pgs / 358 color.





Heads up on 4/20!

DATE 4/20/2024

Heads up on 4/20!

Vintage Valentine

DATE 2/14/2024

Vintage Valentine

Forever Valentino

DATE 11/27/2023

Forever Valentino