ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 10/31/2022

Celebrate Halloween with Christopher Frayling on 'Vampire Cinema: The First One Hundred Years'

DATE 10/25/2022

Rizzoli Bookstore presents Chris Floyd and Catriona Ni Aolain on 'Not Just Pictures'

DATE 10/11/2022

James Cohan gallery presents the launch of 'Alison Elizabeth Taylor: The Sum of It

DATE 10/11/2022

'Alison Elizabeth Taylor: The Sum of It' is new from DelMonico Books & Addison Gallery

DATE 10/10/2022

Honoring Indigenous Peoples' Day with a powerful book on Native Art and Political Ecology

DATE 10/6/2022

From Space Invaders to The Sims

DATE 10/3/2022

A trove of newly discovered color photos in 'The Unseen Saul Leiter'

DATE 10/1/2022

If you believe in Afrofuturism and a glorious African past, 'Marilyn Nance: Last Day in Lagos' is for you

DATE 10/1/2022

CARA presents the launch of 'Marilyn Nance: Last Day in Lagos'

DATE 10/1/2022

Artbook @ Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore presents Betony Vernon signing 'Paradise Found: An Erotic Treasury for Sybarites'

DATE 9/27/2022

In 'Botanical: Observing Beauty,' the core of perception

DATE 9/27/2022

The critically-acclaimed first major biography on Piet Mondrian in 50 years, in English

DATE 9/27/2022

Isolde Brielmaier in conversation with Aruna D’Souza on 'I Am Sparkling'


IMAGE GALLERY

'Alison Elizabeth Taylor: The Sum of It' is new from DelMonico Books & Addison Gallery

DATE 10/11/2022

'Alison Elizabeth Taylor: The Sum of It' is new from DelMonico Books & Addison Gallery

Featured spreads are from new release Alison Elizabeth Taylor: The Sum of It, launching tonight at James Cohan gallery. Published to accompany the exhibition opening October 15 at Des Moines Art Center (en route to the Addison Gallery), this is the first major monograph on the rising artist whose intricate, even classical, inlaid-wood paintings paradoxically depict gritty scenes of real life, down in the trenches. "Taylor’s approach to painting appears unlimited in its scope, from abstractions to scenes of daily life, landscapes and interiors, to fantasy and portraiture," Lynne Tillman writes. "She discovered materials that mattered to her, that elicited uncanny realities, making the familiar unfamiliar by incorporating what isn’t commonly there—the unreality of lived reality, the genuine oddness of how things are, how they look, and what could be there. She paints fantasies, dreams, wishes as inherent interiors. Ultimately, Taylor’s depictions also problematize the nature of painting and naturalness itself. The questions that arise from art, thoughts it provokes, associations viewers draw from it, are its answers—how it is seen in the present. Taylor’s art responds to our contemporary moment, contentious, divided, pieces that do and don’t fit together, and looking at her work, I think about the fragility of personality, divided identities, and how the everyday entails the effort to get oneself together."

Honoring Indigenous Peoples' Day with a powerful book on Native Art and Political Ecology

DATE 10/10/2022

Honoring Indigenous Peoples' Day with a powerful book on Native Art and Political Ecology

Featured spreads are from Exposure: Native Art and Political Ecology, back in stock from Radius Books and IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts. With a particular focus on the impact of nuclear testing, accidents and uranium mining on Native peoples and the environment, this volume is edited by MoCNA Chief Curator Manuela Well-Off-Man. She writes: "The artists included in Exposure offer critical, experiential, and emotional analyses of the nuclear story and reveal the absence of Indigenous voices in the official narrative, which has been dominated by settler colonialism. Too often, governments, outsider mining companies and the military initiated uranium extraction and nuclear weapons testing on Indigenous lands without any permission from the tribes. As a result, toxic radiation can still be found in the environment and in the bodies of Indigenous people even decades after exposure. As the artworks in this exhibition reveal, the reasons for uranium mining and nuclear arms testing are rooted in the same ideologies that gave rise to colonialism. Many Indigenous cultures have stories that teach about the importance of leaving uranium in the ground to avoid harm. We need to return to a culture of respect and listen to these stories. Because the half-life of plutonium is 24,000 years and the half-life of U235 is 703.8 million years, it is crucial that artists keep exposing the threats of toxic radiation and nuclear catastrophes for present and future generations."

From Space Invaders to The Sims

DATE 10/6/2022

From Space Invaders to The Sims

Never Alone: Video Games as Interactive Design—an exploration of interactive design through 35 classic examples of video games—is on view now at MoMA. We're certainly feeling nostalgic about iconic early games like Pac-Man, 1980, pictured here. "We believe that video games can be a vehicle for moving society forward," Paola Antonelli, Anna Burckhardt and Paul Galloway write; "Steven Poole, at the turn of the twenty-first century, declared that they would 'shape the worlds we will all inhabit tomorrow.' We would like to think this is still true: That video games, through their nature as interactive design and their potential to shape behavior, can encourage tolerance, fluidity and pluralism, and help societies withstand reactionary attacks against human and civil rights. That they can be testing grounds for the avant-garde, for notions still too radical for the wider public. That they can model equitable and inclusive communities and challenge, in their imaginative spaces, previous modes of racial representation and gender construction. That they can give attention, acknowledgement and respect to underrepresented cultures, as does Never Alone, the game that gives this book its title. That they can bring us closer to nature and focus our awareness on climate change and the associated environmental crises. That through them we can embody and empathize with other individuals and other species and perhaps even will a more respectful and balanced reality into being. Through museums and other cultural institutions that look into the past to think about how the future might unroll, we may begin to comprehend the power of video games to surpass the hurdles we encounter IRL, and to harness that power for good."