ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 2/16/2023

Join Artbook | D.A.P. at the 2023 CAA National Conference

DATE 2/15/2023

The Brooklyn Museum presents the launch of 'Imagining the Future Museum: 21 Dialogues with Architects' by András Szántó

DATE 2/5/2023

Join Artbook | D.A.P. at the Winter 2023 Shoppe Object Independent Home and Gift Show

DATE 1/30/2023

Artbook @ MoMA PS1 presents the book celebration and signing of 'Just Above Midtown: Changing Spaces'

DATE 1/29/2023

Lyrical and exuberant, 'Joseph Stella: Visionary Nature' releases this week

DATE 1/27/2023

'Elizaveta Porodina: Un/Masked' opens at Fotografiska New York

DATE 1/24/2023

Themes of gender, race, class and social change in 'Events of the Social'

DATE 1/23/2023

Happy New Year from Artbook | D.A.P.!

DATE 1/21/2023

Deborah Bell presents Elaine Mayes and Kevin Moore on 'The Haight-Ashbury Portraits'

DATE 1/21/2023

Into the meat grinder

DATE 1/19/2023

McNally Jackson Books Seaport and Primary Information present Mirene Arsanios, Constance DeJong and Annie-B Parson

DATE 1/19/2023

Humanity, depth and insight in 'Peter Hujar Curated by Elton John'

DATE 1/18/2023

Amy Sherald, infusing the present and the future with hope


ARTBOOK FEATURED IMAGE ARCHIVE

Celebrate Earth Day with 'A Bestiary of the Anthropocene'!

DATE 4/22/2022

Celebrate Earth Day with 'A Bestiary of the Anthropocene'!

Featured spreads are from A Bestiary of the Anthropocene: Hybrid Plants, Animals, Minerals, Fungi, and Other Specimens, edited by Nicolas Nova and DISNOVATION.ORG and published by our friends at Onomatopee Projects. Printed in striking silver-on-black with flush, pure black edges, this beautifully designed and remarkably well-written and researched international field handbook gathers notes on the evolving hybrid flora and fauna of the “post-natural” world we now inhabit as members of the Anthropocene era. Rock speakers, plastic-eating caterpillars, square watermelons, artificial turf, radioactive mushrooms and contrails are all addressed, alongside observations on bestiaries, artificiality, planetary indigestion, ferality and much more—all over the course of 256 pages and 90 duotone illustrations by Polish graphic designer Maria Roszkowska. “This bestiary of the Anthropocene aims at helping us observe, navigate and orientate into the increasingly artificial fabric of the world,” Nova writes. “It aims at encouraging us to pay attention, to perceive the nuances and the assemblage of a dark ecology that arose in the last decades.”

Celebrate Earth Day with the hyperreal feel of 'Landscape Painting Now'

DATE 4/20/2022

Celebrate Earth Day with the hyperreal feel of 'Landscape Painting Now'

Makiko Kudo’s “Burning Red” (2012) is reproduced from Landscape Painting Now: From Pop Abstraction to New Romanticism, our best-selling 2019 survey edited by Todd Bradway and the genesis for Unnatural Nature: Post-Pop Landscapes, the show Bradway has curated for Aquavella Galleries in Palm Springs and New York City right now. “The wide-eyed girls who populate Makiko Kudo’s landscapes are the witnesses more than protagonists of stories that might take place within them,” Barry Schwabsky writes; “we see the verdant scene as though from their point of view: a double consciousness of a familiar place where, she says, ‘the scenery is shining in my eyes… burned into my brain.’ It is a hyperreality enjoined by feeling rather than by minute attention to details; what ties it to Pop is not the banality of the everyday but quite the opposite, a childlike wonder at even the most ordinary things (which, for instance, Warhol projected onto the Campbell’s soup his mother gave him for lunch every day as a kid).”

In honor of Yom Kippur, the art of 'Modern Mystic' Hyman Bloom

DATE 9/16/2021

In honor of Yom Kippur, the art of 'Modern Mystic' Hyman Bloom

"Spiritual life cannot be delegated; true spiritual experience can only come from within, and it is only through individual effort to deepen the process that a state of grace can be achieved. Certain kinds of knowledge can only be earned, sometimes through effort, and other times through suffering." So said Hyman Bloom, the influential but overlooked painter whose work is collected in this essential monograph. Despite Bloom's European Jewish heritage, his lifelong interest in mysticism ultimately transcended any one religion, philosophy or point of view. Featured image is "The Stone" (1947).