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RECENT POSTS

DATE 6/21/2021

Weird mojo in 'Another World: The Transcendental Painting Group'

DATE 6/20/2021

For the cool collector Dad: 'Marred for Life! Defaced Record Covers from the Collection of Greg Wooten'

DATE 6/18/2021

Bureau of General Services—Queer Division presents 'LIFELINES: Art, Intimacy and HIV—an Intergenerational Conversation'

DATE 6/18/2021

On Juneteenth, we celebrate the everyday heroes of Mario Moore’s portraiture

DATE 6/18/2021

Travel Guides!

DATE 6/17/2021

Definitive 'Sophie Taeuber-Arp: Living Abstraction' is New from MoMA

DATE 6/15/2021

'Young, Gifted and Black: A New Generation of Artists' is Back in Stock!

DATE 6/13/2021

The little-known photographs of Barkley L. Hendricks

DATE 6/12/2021

Gay Pride Gold in 'Tom of Finland: Made in Germany'

DATE 6/12/2021

Join Kristin Bedford and the Los Angeles Lowrider Community for the release of 'Cruise Night'

DATE 6/10/2021

Monochrome chic in 'Alex Katz: Beauty'

DATE 6/8/2021

'David Hockney: Drawing from Life' is a Staff Pick for Pride Month 2021

DATE 6/6/2021

From hair lacquer to whiskey and sweat in 2021 Pride Month Staff Pick, Karlheinz Weinberger, 'Together & Alone'

DATE 6/3/2021

Electrifying 'Barbara Kruger: Thinking of You. I Mean Me. I Mean You' is a New Release this week!

DATE 6/1/2021

A book like no other. We are thrilled to announce 'An Illustrated Catalog of American Fruits & Nuts'

DATE 6/1/2021

Celebrate LGBTQ+ Pride, 2021!

DATE 5/26/2021

A glimmer of hope in new release, 'Rashid Johnson: The Hikers'

DATE 5/24/2021

On the anniversary of George Floyd’s death, a compendium of writings by and about Black American artists, 1960–1980

DATE 5/20/2021

Alice Mackler does what she wants to do

DATE 5/20/2021

In 'Fabric of a Nation,' quilts "unlike any other in the world"

DATE 5/18/2021

Highly Anticipated ‘Soul of a Nation Reader’ is a New Release this week!

DATE 5/16/2021

Super-hot Kara Walker works on paper survey 'A Black Hole Is Everything a Star Longs to Be' is Back in Stock!

DATE 5/14/2021

A timely meditation on voting rights in Jeanine Michna-Bales' 'Standing Together'

DATE 5/13/2021

Alice Mackler Book Launch and Signing at Kerry Schuss Gallery

DATE 5/12/2021

Essential reading: Arthur Jafa’s ‘MAGNUMB’ is a new release this week

DATE 5/10/2021

'Shepard Fairey: 3 Decades of Dissent' is a New Release this week!

DATE 5/9/2021

Definitely our pick for Mothers Day 2021

DATE 5/8/2021

Groundbreaking Brazilian amateur Modernist photography show ‘Fotoclubismo’ opens at MoMA

DATE 5/6/2021

Hot Book Alert! 'A Bestiary of the Anthropocene' is a New Release this week!

DATE 5/5/2021

We're celebrating Cinco de Mayo with Phyllis Galembo's classic 'Mexico Masks Rituals'

DATE 5/1/2021

Summertime Staff Picks, 2021

DATE 4/29/2021

Did we mention how much we love 'Joel Meyerowitz: Wild Flowers'?

DATE 4/28/2021

BACK IN STOCK! The expanded 'Gerhard Richter: Panorama'

DATE 4/27/2021

Perfume-lovers, rejoice! ‘The Handbook of Great Italian Perfumery’ is a new release this week!

DATE 4/26/2021

Commemorating the Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster, 35 Years Later

DATE 4/25/2021

Intimate, imaginary and emotionally charged spaces in 'Shara Hughes: Landscapes'

DATE 4/23/2021

Pedagogical goldmine 'Wicked Arts Assignments' is back in stock!

DATE 4/22/2021

Celebrate Earth Day in the Anthropocene with 'Connectedness'

DATE 4/20/2021

A reflection on what it meant, and means, to be 'Black in White America'

DATE 4/20/2021

A vivid discussion between Sarah Sze, Anselm Kiefer and Emanuele Coccia on the occasion of 'Night into Day' at Fondation Cartier

DATE 4/19/2021

A remarkable new artist's book from Michael Stipe

DATE 4/17/2021

'Tauba Auerbach — S v Z' is a book to be reckoned with, slowly, with an open mind

DATE 4/16/2021

Remembering Merce Cunningham, born OTD 1919

DATE 4/15/2021

Fondation Cartier presents Sarah Sze in conversation with Anselm Kiefer and Emanuele Coccia for the launch of 'Night into Day'

DATE 4/14/2021

Frank Stella's Stars: A Survey is a New Release

DATE 4/13/2021

Martin Parr in conversation with Joel Meyerowitz, whose new, expanded edition of 'Wild Flowers,' is out now from Damiani

DATE 4/11/2021

In Yayoi Kusama's Little Mermaid, a "symbol of all good hearts and of love"

DATE 4/8/2021

Jeremy Sigler's 'Goodbye Letter' is a Staff Pick for National Poetry Month

DATE 4/6/2021

Celebrate National Poetry Month with a new facsimile edition of N.H. Pritchard's 'EECCHHOOEESS'

DATE 4/4/2021

Titian's celebration of Easter, from 'The Christian Year in Painting'

DATE 4/3/2021

In Siglio's Madeline Gins Reader, the plot thickens and thickens, line by line, item by item


RECENT POSTS

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/21/2021

Weird mojo in 'Another World: The Transcendental Painting Group'

“Blue Forms” (1942) by Florence Miller Pierce is reproduced from Another World: The Transcendental Painting Group, the highly-anticipated new release from DelMonico Books and the Crocker Art Museum, published to accompany the traveling exhibition opening this week in Albuquerque. The first book devoted to this underrecognized group of artists from the Southwest who promoted abstraction in pursuit of enlightenment and spiritual illumination, Another World, collects 175 images by Emil Bisttram, Ed Garman, Robert Gribbroek, Lawren Harris, Raymond Jonson, William Lumpkins, Agnes Pelton, Horace Towner Pierce, Dane Rudhyar and Stuart Walker, in addition to Miller Pierce. “Contemporary abstraction, broadly, now seems to be grasping for styles and concepts that break from the formal restrictions of the past century,” curator and editor Michael Duncan writes. “Aimless doodles, random tracings, scribbles and daubs have proliferated on canvases for several decades now. Given the dire state of the world today, we need something more. The TPG provides a model for how, today, more than eighty years later, nonobjective art might once again regain its mojo, rekindle the spirit and nourish the soul.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/20/2021

For the cool collector Dad: 'Marred for Life! Defaced Record Covers from the Collection of Greg Wooten'

It was impossible to choose a single image from our Father's Day favorite Marred for Life!, collecting 275 out of approximately 1500 anonymously vandalized vintage record covers from the collection of west coast musician and design purveyor Greg Wooten. They're all so good! "I spend a lot of my free time making the rounds in the L.A. record shop scene, "Wooten writes. "I like the dual mission of looking for the cleanest, best examples of rare spiritual Jazz LPs while simultaneously scouring the dollar bins, hoping to find a Carpenters' record where some kid I'll never know decided to black-out some of their teeth! I often wonder, but will never know, how each of these defaced covers, found in the world, came to be. Once I jumped into the defaced hole, I realized that the range of defacing was wide—so many subcategories, from really thought-out and artful to just blatantly disrespectful. Bloodshot eyes, blackened teeth, mustaches, tattoos, reviews, love letters, collage, psychedelia, pornography, etc. Sometimes over-the-top and other times wonderfully subtle—and often, really funny too! I can't help but see these as anonymous and personal folk art of some sort."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/18/2021

Bureau of General Services—Queer Division presents 'LIFELINES: Art, Intimacy and HIV—an Intergenerational Conversation'

Friday, June 18 from 6–7:30PM, Bureau of General Services—Queer Division presents Eric Rhein in conversation with Mark Doty and Paul Michael Brown, as they celebrate and reflect upon the themes that run through Rhein's first monograph-memoir, 'Lifelines'—to which Doty and Brown contribute key essays.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/18/2021

On Juneteenth, we celebrate the everyday heroes of Mario Moore’s portraiture

Featured spreads are from The Work of Several Lifetimes, Detroit native Mario Moore’s new collection of portraits of the Black blue-collar workers who keep Princeton University running behind the scenes. “I knew that whatever I created for this series would walk a tight line between the expectation of how Black people are seen in blue-collar jobs versus the true representation of them—making them visible,” Moore writes. “Generally, portraits at elite institutions are created to represent owners, donors, deans, presidents and scholars. But I wanted to ask the question: Which positions garner such attention and how could painting contribute to conversations about who deserves to be recognized? My hope is that the work I created has explored a sense of power and individuality. I believe that all of the work offers insight into each individual that is more complex, more nuanced than at first glance.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/17/2021

Definitive 'Sophie Taeuber-Arp: Living Abstraction' is New from MoMA

Featured photograph, of the remarkable, until now largely-overlooked, self-described "artist/painter" Sophie Taeuber-Arp in costume for a 1925 housewarming party organized by artist Walter Helbig in Ascona, Switzerland, is reproduced from MoMA’s gorgeous, enlightening and destined-to-be-classic new release, Sophie Taeuber-Arp: Living Abstraction. Published to accompany the first American retrospective of the artist’s work in forty years, arriving in New York in November 2021 after stops in Basel and London, this definitive 352-page survey features 435 color reproductions spanning art and craft, including textiles, marionettes, masks, costumes, choreography, architecture, interior design, stained glass, paintings, drawings and much more—right down to a philosophy of life that feels fresher and more necessary than ever. Today, “we can celebrate Taeuber-Arp’s hybrid body of work in all its complexity,” co-curators Anne Umland and Walburga Krupp write, “without being forced to choose between a binary either/or (either art or craft). Instead, Taeuber-Arp’s multivalent, interdisciplinary practice insists on both/and: both art and craft, major and minor, visual and functional, serious and beautiful. Such openness is part of what makes her abstraction ‘living,’ in its ability to sustain multiple, at times contradictory, reinterpretations, repositionings and readings. It is also the hallmark of all great works of art, both fine and applied.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/15/2021

'Young, Gifted and Black: A New Generation of Artists' is Back in Stock!

We are delighted to announce that a new shipment of the landmark survey Young, Gifted and Black: A New Generation of Artists has just released from our warehouse—the third printing of this best-selling title since it first burst on the scene less than one year ago. Pictured here are spreads featuring work by Jordan Casteel, Sadie Barnette and Paul Mpagi Sepuya—all artists in their thirties. Other artists, spanning several generations, include Mark Bradford, David Hammons, Glenn Ligon, Kerry James Marshall, Julie Mehretu, Adam Pendleton, Pope.L, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Henry Taylor, Mickalene Thomas, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Christina Quarles and Jacolby Satterwhite, to name just a few. Drawn from the renowned collection of Bernard I. Lumpkin and Carmine D. Boccuzzi, this beautifully-produced book is also a call to action, documenting not just an exemplary collecting philosophy, but a full-fledged support system driven by passion, personal history and a commitment to promoting not just artists but writers and curators of color throughout their careers. Edited by Antwaun Sargent, it features writing by Graham C. Boettcher, Jessica Bell Brown, Connie H. Choi, Anthony Graham, Lauren Haynes, Jamillah James, Thomas J. Lax, Hallie Ringle, Adeze Wilford, Gordon Dearborn Wilkins and Matt Wycoff, curator of the traveling exhibition. Studio Museum Director and Chief Curator Thelma Golden contributes an interview with the driving force behind the collection, Bernard Lumpkin.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/13/2021

The little-known photographs of Barkley L. Hendricks

“Untitled” (1974) is reproduced from Barkley L. Hendricks: Photography, the highly-anticipated new release from Skira. Whether used as source material for Barkley’s iconic figurative paintings or produced as discreet artworks in and of themselves—Hendricks studied with Walker Evans at Yale—the 50 color photographs gathered here comprise a key, but until now, little-known aspect of the artist’s oeuvre. In both his paintings and his photographs, Hendricks involved his subjects in a riveting performance. Yet, "taking a photograph was just as much a performance on his part," Anna Arabindan-Kesson writes, "a stage on which he could reveal his own artistry. Diminutive actions, slight gestures, fine angles and unconscious expressions, these were the notations with which Barkley L. Hendricks worked.”

Image © Estate of Barkley L. Hendricks. Courtesy of the artist’s estate and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/12/2021

Join Kristin Bedford and the Los Angeles Lowrider Community for the release of 'Cruise Night'

Saturday, June 12 from 6–10PM, photographer Kristin Bedford will celebrate the release of 'Cruise Night,' her best-selling book on Mexican American Lowrider culture, with the Los Angeles Lowrider Community. Join Bedford for a book signing, food, music, raffles, 50/50, trophies and more! Books will be available for sale!

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/12/2021

Gay Pride Gold in 'Tom of Finland: Made in Germany'

“Hamburg Ahoi!” (1980) is reproduced from Tom of Finland: Made in Germany, Skira’s eye-popping 176-page compendium of early drawings by the legendary creator of some of the most iconic homoerotic images, worldwide, of all time—who spent several formative years in 1970s Hamburg en route from his eponymous birthplace to the more sexually-liberated climes of Los Angeles. Featuring 150 extremely graphic illustrations—this one being the proverbial tip of the iceberg—alongside highly researched texts and a facsimile of a 1955 travel diary from the artist’s earlier trip to Germany, this is a book that neatly straddles high art, scholarship and historic gay pornography.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/10/2021

Monochrome chic in 'Alex Katz: Beauty'

Featured spreads are from Beauty, the elegant new clothbound collection of recent close-up, black-and-white print portraits by Alex Katz, newly released from Karma Books, New York and Lococo Fine Art Publisher, St. Louis. Bookending a gorgeously-printed plate section are meditations on beauty by noted art writers Jarrett Earnest and Carter Ratcliff, who conducts a dialogue with Beauty. One section reads: “And what about beauty? What does it turn the world into?
Nothing, said Beauty.
Beauty turns the world into nothing?
Let me put it another way. Beauty does not turn anything into anything else. It is not a transformative agent. It is not an agent. Which might be hard for you to understand, you’re so infatuated with your sense of agency, as you call it. But if you could get over yourself for a moment you’d see that world and beauty are synonyms.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/8/2021

'David Hockney: Drawing from Life' is a Staff Pick for Pride Month 2021

Titled "Gregory, Los Angeles, March 31st 1982," this evocative composite Polaroid from David Hockney: Drawing from Life captures Gregory Evans, Hockney's intimate friend and consistent model for more than fifty years—as well as his assistant, studio manager, and now, curator and adviser. "I’ve drawn a lot of Gregory," Hockey is quoted. "I think the way I draw, the more I know and react to people, the more interesting the drawings will be," Hockney says elsewhere in the book. "I don’t really like struggling for a likeness. It seems a bit of a waste of effort… If you don’t know the person, you don’t really know if you’ve got a likeness at all."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/6/2021

From hair lacquer to whiskey and sweat in 2021 Pride Month Staff Pick, Karlheinz Weinberger, 'Together & Alone'

Featured image is reproduced from Karlheinz Weinberger: Photographs, Together & Alone, the 2021 Pride Month Staff Pick published by The Song Cave. Collecting more than 200 never-before-published vintage photographs that were rediscovered in 2017, this volume includes pictures of Weinberger’s famous teenage Swiss “rebels” of the late 1950s and early 1960s, shot outside at carnivals and camp sites, alongside very direct but also strange nude male portraits from the late 1950s through the mid-1970s, which Weinberger somehow managed to make in a studio he’d set up in the apartment he shared with his mother. “Weinberger’s early images smell of hair lacquer and the later ones smell of whiskey and sweat,” Collier Schorr writes in her excellent introduction. “The latent adolescence of the closeted homosexual gives way to manhood. In a sense they—photographer and subjects—grew up together.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/3/2021

Electrifying 'Barbara Kruger: Thinking of You. I Mean Me. I Mean You' is a New Release this week!

Featured spreads are from Barbara Kruger: Thinking of You. I Mean Me. I Mean You—easily one of the most engaging, relevant and graphically compelling books on our Spring 2021 list—published by DelMonico Books and Los Angeles County Museum of Art in advance of a highly-anticipated five-decade retrospective opening at the Art Institute of Chicago in September of 2021, en route to LACMA in 2022 with a related exhibition at MoMA spanning into early 2023. Zoé Whitley writes, “With the observational skill and rigor of a social anthropologist, Kruger has maintained a lifetime interest in recording human behavior in capitalist society, drawing on social semiotics and retinal perception to reflect our basest impulses and most selfish desires back to us.… Kruger creates situations where we can meaningfully engage in systemic critique as well as self-reflection. How often might we otherwise consider the psychosocial stakes of feeling superior or inferior to others? Of examining our own actions when looking down on someone else, or reflecting upon the circumstances dictating whom we look up to? A clairvoyant narrator confronts us, conjuring images in the mind’s eye of our vulnerabilities and those, unseen, who might exploit them. Caught between this proverbial rock and hard place, the viewer must choose where to stand between hierarchies of speaking up and hero worship.… Barbara Kruger doesn’t stand apart from the critiques she evinces, nor does she judge her audience for the positions individually taken to behold or to opt out. Instead, she optimistically offers, ‘There can be—and hopefully there is—separation between self-belief and narcissism.’ For all its black-and-white clarity, Kruger’s art ultimately revels in the gray areas, luring us into the nuances to be found in between extremes.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/1/2021

A book like no other. We are thrilled to announce 'An Illustrated Catalog of American Fruits & Nuts'

Featured spreads are from An Illustrated Catalog of American Fruits & Nuts, Atelier Éditions’ stupendous new 356-page collection of pomological watercolors commissioned by The U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1886–1942. Culled from almost 7,500 botanical illustrations, the 300 exquisite examples selected here are accompanied by anecdotes and observations from the fields of archaeology and anthropology, horticulture and literature, ancient representation and contemporary visual art, alongside texts by Jacqueline Landy, John McPhee, Michael Pollan and Marina Vitaglione. In the chapter introducing Apples, or Pomes, Henry David Thoreau is quoted: “I frequently pluck wild apples of so rich and spicy a flavor that I wonder all orchardists do not get a scion from that tree, and I fail not to bring home my pockets full. But perchance, when I take one out of my desk and taste it in my chamber, I find it unexpectedly crude, — sour enough to set a squirrel’s teeth on edge and make a jay scream. [...] The out-door air and exercise which the walker gets give a different tone to his palate, and he craves a fruit which the sedentary would call harsh and crabbed. They must be eaten in the fields, when your system is all aglow with exercise, when the frosty weather nips your fingers, the wind rattles the bare boughs.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/26/2021

A glimmer of hope in new release, 'Rashid Johnson: The Hikers'

In 2019, American artist Rashid Johnson debuted the powerful site-specific film, choreographed performance and exhibition The Hikers at the Aspen Art Museum—produced in collaboration with Museo Tamayo and Hauser & Wirth New York under the auspices of the prestigious 2018 Aspen Award for Art. Featured here is a photograph of the performance, choreographed with Claudia Schreier, in front of the sixteen-foot-long Untitled Escape Collage (2019)—comprised of such varied materials as ceramic tile, mirror tile, braded red oak flooring, vinyl, spray enamel, oil stick, black soap and wax. The photograph, by Tony Prikryl, is reproduced from the extraordinary new 440-page, 9.5 x 13-inch, Swiss-bound exhibition catalog, which features remarkable documentation of the work in all three venues, as well as a conversation between Johnson and Schreier and insightful essays by curators Manuela Moscoso and Heidi Zuckerman, who quotes the artist, “I’m probably concerned about a lot of the same things that many of you are concerned about, to be completely honest. I’m concerned about us. I’m concerned about you guys. I’m concerned about the world that my son is going to be inheriting. He’s six years old. I’m concerned about my personal anxiety disorder. I’m concerned about race relations, gender issues, issues around homophobia, issues around how institutions function, the environment. If you can name an ‘ism,’ I’m probably concerned about that ‘ism.’”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/24/2021

On the anniversary of George Floyd’s death, a compendium of writings by and about Black American artists, 1960–1980

Featured here are the covers of Contemporary Black Artists in America (Whitney Museum of American Art, 1971), The Black 70’s, edited by Floyd B. Barbour (Porter Sargent, 1970) and AFRI-COBRA III (University Art Gallery, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 1973)—three of the publications featured in Gregory R. Miller & Co.’s landmark new release, The Soul of a Nation Reader, a collection of original writings by and on artists of the Black Power era. Edited by Mark Godfrey and Allie Biswas, this comprehensive, exhaustively researched volume is the only book of its kind. This week, on the anniversary of George Floyd’s tragic but catalytic death, it is clear that this historic collection could not be more relevant, or more empowering. On another cover, of the short-lived ABA: A Journal of Affairs of Black Artists, conceived in 1971 by Edmund Barry Gaither and funded by the Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists (NCAAA) in Boston, the editors printed the following text: “Where has the Black Artist in America been all this time? He’s been in the streets in Watts, in Roxbury and Chicago. He’s been in his body. In hard times. He’s been in the eyes of people who love him and the eyes of people who hate him. And he’s been putting it all down. On canvas. In stone. Out of wood. Affairs of Black Artists, a new journal devoted to the life and times of Black Artists, takes a good look at where the Black Artist in America has been, where he is, and where he’s going. It’s beautiful. It’s enlightening. It’s about time.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/20/2021

Alice Mackler does what she wants to do

Featured spreads are reproduced from Alice Mackler, the first monograph on the nonagenarian ceramicist whose work has only recently received the critical attention it has long deserved. Launching Thursday, May 20, at Kerry Schuss Gallery, this book is both a hot design object—note the super-satisfying orange paper edges—and a great read, featuring essays by Matthew Higgs and Kelly Taxter and an interview of the artist by painter Joanne Greenbaum—with Mackler’s refreshingly blunt responses scratched back by hand. For example, when Greenbaum asks, “What artists or works of art have been most significant to you and how do they influence how you work today?” Mackler replies, “Klee, Miro, Chagall. Alice does what she wants to do.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/20/2021

In 'Fabric of a Nation,' quilts "unlike any other in the world"

Made around 1955, this Bricklayer or Courthouse Steps quilt from Gee’s Bend, Alabama, is reproduced from Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories, the highly anticipated new release from MFA Publications, Museum of Fine Arts Boston. Published in advance of a major Fall 2021 exhibition, this volume spans 400 years of quilt-making by Americans of European, African, Native and Hispanic heritage, with a focus on 58 quilts “unlike any other in the world,” to quote Alice Walker. This particular quilt was probably made by Creola Bennett Pettway in the mid-1950s. “A sophisticated arrangement of red and white cotton strips, its color blocks form a dynamic hourglass shape in a minimalist composition that would rival any abstract painting. Typical of Gee’s Bend, Creola Pettway came from a long line of prolific quilt makers including her mother, Delia Bennett. Steeped in quilt making from an early age, Creola remembered her mother had four quilt frames and encouraged her daughters to help with quilting the corners. Later, as a master quilter herself, Creola took pride in the free-form creativity required to compose her works, recalling that she would ‘decide in my mind the way I want that quilt. When I decide the way I want it, I can make it. You can do things out of your head.’”

Court House Steps quilt. Probably by Creola Bennett Pettway (American, 1927–2015) or possibly by Georgianna Bennett Pettway (American, died in 2012). Alabama, 1950s. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The Heritage Fund for a Diverse Collection, 2014.2049. Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.


CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/18/2021

Highly Anticipated ‘Soul of a Nation Reader’ is a New Release this week!

Featured spreads are from The ‘Soul of a Nation’ Reader: Writings by and about Black American Artists, 1960–1980, publisher Gregory R. Miller & Co.’s remarkable new 628-page compendium of approximately 230 original texts on Black identity, activism and social responsibility—many of which are previously unpublished, rare or have been out of print for decades. This essential volume was compiled over more than eight years of painstaking research by editors Mark Godfrey (curator of the landmark exhibition Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power), who contributes a substantial introductory essay, and Allie Biswas, who has written contextualizing introductions for each historic text. “In their own words! Clearly, Black culture is not a monolith," Kerry James Marshall writes. "Disputes about the status of Black artists and their liberation, or obligations, have rumbled through intellectual circles for generations. In shouts and murmurs, with protests and manifestos, artists and political activists have made their positions known. For the first time, a broad selection of the arguments covering the 1960s to 1980s has been compiled in a single volume. Now, anybody interested in understanding what is still at stake can do so with The 'Soul of a Nation' Reader.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/16/2021

Super-hot Kara Walker works on paper survey 'A Black Hole Is Everything a Star Longs to Be' is Back in Stock!

Featured spreads are from Kara Walker: A Black Hole Is Everything a Star Longs to Be, the astonishing new 600-page collection of drawings from the artist's private archive, published by JRP | Editions to accompany a major Kunstmuseum Basel show opening June 5, 2021. "It is hubristic to believe that a saved handwritten memo reading: 'A Black Hole Is Everything a Star Longs to Be' taped to my wall should be regarded by me as a monument," Walker writes. "I scrawled it in the hope its meaning would become clear to me later. The phrase was initially cartooned onto a long scroll of images and notes from 2012, the entire phrase beginning 'The Sweet Sweet Smell of Success and the Stench of Ingratitude … A Black Hole Is Everything a Star Longs to Be.” The image that accompanies this is that of a Black woman, naked, crouched—vomiting on the shoe of an empowered (clothed, pointing, scowling) white man, whose foot is perched on a shoeshine stand. The implication is that this drawing, in its smallness, is a rejection of blind subservience to patriarchal demands that art and artists cater to the market, to the man, to art history, to scale, or to anything not of her own making. I revel in the contradictory pose of the subservient miss, giving 'not what he asked for,' but giving nonetheless. The private drawing satisfies the public urge—a purgative. This phrase is also about the Anti-Art Star who finds more promise in the dark gravitational forces of the Black Hole.
Astronomically a black hole tears apart the known universe; it shakes the foundations of what science can know (and is thus ironically relegated to being 'black') and it is the potential fate of every star in the known heavens. I rediscovered the scroll with this comment fast on the heels of the news about the making of the first recorded image of a black hole—an out of focus capture, but an ultimately fascinating image taken by the Hubble telescope of the distant anomaly. Suddenly the poetic little phrase felt timely, and I rewrote it hastily and taped it to the wall as a reminder that it was ready to come into its own, to do its dark magic, as a title, and as an action."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/14/2021

A timely meditation on voting rights in Jeanine Michna-Bales' 'Standing Together'

"Women Hold Up Half of the Sky" (2019) is reproduced from Standing Together: Inez Milholland's Final Campaign for Women's Suffrage, MW Editions’ new collection of recent and historic photographs, quotations and painstakingly researched archival materials by Jeanine Michna-Bales. At a time when voting rights are at the absolute forefront of national debate, this book—which retraces the pioneering women’s suffrage advocate Inez Milholland Boissevain’s grueling 1916 campaign across the Western US—conveys both immediately and poetically the heroic effort required to pass the 19th Amendment. In fact, Inez Milholland Boissevain gave her life for the cause. “Although the principle of equal rights is enshrined in America’s founding documents,” Michna-Bales writes, “those rights have historically been reserved for certain groups—mainly white men—and have been violently withheld from many people, most grievously from immigrants and Black and indigenous Americans.… It is clear that we still have work to do. And as Inez would have wished, I truly hope that we all continue to stand together, shoulder to shoulder, using our voices with courage and devotion as we move ‘forward out of error’ and ‘forward into light.’”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/13/2021

Alice Mackler Book Launch and Signing at Kerry Schuss Gallery

Thursday, May 20 from 6:30–8PM, Gregory R. Miller & Co., New York Consolidated and Kerry Schuss Gallery invite you to a book event celebrating 'Alice Mackler.' Remarks by authors Matthew Higgs and Kelly Taxter will be at 7PM, after which Mackler will sign copies of the book. 'Alice Mackler: New Work' will be on view at the gallery through June 12.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/12/2021

Essential reading: Arthur Jafa’s ‘MAGNUMB’ is a new release this week

Featured stills are from Arthur Jafa’s indelible Love Is The Message, The Message Is Death (2016), reproduced from the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art’s highly anticipated survey, published to accompany the exhibition on view now through October 2021 in Humlebaek, Denmark. “Writing about the work of Arthur Jafa is a daunting task, due in no small part to the conceptual and emotional density of the material,” Jared Sexton writes. “One has to approach it slowly and let it wash over you in waves: light waves, sounds waves, tidal waves, waves of emotion. There’s a whole intertextual universe that it draws from—folklore, history, literature, music, philosophy, religion—that in turn draws you into prolonged study, however and wherever you take it up. It is difficult to do any justice to it, whether considering the particular works that will debut in this exhibition or the larger body of work that anyone moving through the art world over the last decade is trying to get their heads around. Or trying to get their arms around, to embrace it or commune with it or wrestle with it. No matter your approach, though, the work will knock you on your ass. But only after first announcing there is, by design, no furniture to sit on, no handrails to guide you, no stairs, no ramp, no elevator, no portal to get you where you need to be.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/10/2021

'Shepard Fairey: 3 Decades of Dissent' is a New Release this week!

This 2019 print of “MAKE ART NOT WAR” (2005) is reproduced from Shepard Fairey: 3 Decades of Dissent, the new retrospective of Fairey’s work (including 30 new pieces) in conversation with historical works from the permanent collection of the Gallery of Modern Art in Rome. (For example, "MAKE ART NOT WAR" is paired with three etherial Art Nouveau paintings of an angel, a saint and a nymph.) “These artworks all address the human concerns of their artists and eras, showing that the creative response takes many forms,” Fairey writes. “I’m delighted to see the aesthetic parallels of much of my art with the work of Giulio Turcato or the conceptual provocation of Pino Pascali. For me, art is about instigating and inspiring conversations, and I believe that this show’s multiple layers will provoke thought and rich discussion.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/9/2021

Definitely our pick for Mothers Day 2021

Featured image is reproduced from MOM, photographer Charlie Engman’s critically-acclaimed photobook collecting 521 ever-more-riveting, hilarious and chameleon-like portraits of Kathleen McCain Engman—his mother and muse—made 2009–2020. In some photos, she is nude, some clothed. In some she has a shaved head, long hair, braids, a wig, makeup, no make-up, ravaged, ravishing—anything and everything seems within limits as she inhabits each mini-persona dreamed up with her son. “I look at Charlie and Kathleen and realize I could dream a little bigger,” Miranda July writes. “A little weirder. But how does one raise a child so confident that he can create a world of groundbreaking possibility with his own mother? The image that first pulled me into Charlie’s work was a video of Kathleen against a green screen, coifed and made up, in a tasteful blush outfit, churning her arms with a look of intense determination. She was doing something that made no sense but anyone could see it was important. Anyone could be filled with its meaning.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/8/2021

Groundbreaking Brazilian amateur Modernist photography show ‘Fotoclubismo’ opens at MoMA

Roberto Yoshida’s nocturnal 1959 gelatin silver print, "Skyscrapers (Arranha-céus)," is reproduced from Fotoclubismo: Brazilian Modernist Photography and the Foto-Cine Clube Bandeirante, 1946–1964, the catalog to Sarah Hermanson Meister’s eye-opening final exhibition as a MoMA curator, opening this weekend the Museum. Collecting the groundbreaking works of a mid-century São Paulo amateur photography club that has been essentially unknown to European and North American audiences until today, this volume is enlightening, provocative and straight-up delightful—in addition to having one of the most beautiful cover designs on our Spring 2021 list. A wealth of archival materials and documentation of the club’s activities from its inception in 1939 until 1965 rounds out a deeply researched essay and almost 200 duotone reproductions.

DATE 11/15/2020

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: Stocking Stuffers

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: Stocking Stuffers

They're cute, they're small, they're surprising and affordable. Here are 10 staff picks for the stockings on your list »

DATE 11/14/2020

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the Art Lover

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the Art Lover

The must-have art books of 2020 »

DATE 11/13/2020

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the Photographer and Photography Collector

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the Photographer and Photography Collector

A few of our favorite 2020 monographs and surveys by Modern and contemporary photographers »

DATE 11/12/2020

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the Design Devotee

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the Design Devotee

Gifts for design devotees: your guide to the top new architecture and design books for the 2020 holidays »

DATE 11/10/2020

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the Food Lover

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the Food Lover

Whether you love to cook, eat or ponder the politics of food, here are our staff pick food and cooking gift books of 2020 »

DATE 11/9/2020

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For LGBTQ Readers

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For LGBTQ Readers

Our staff favorite 2020 books on or by LGBTQ artists »

DATE 11/8/2020

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the Fashion Forward

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the Fashion Forward

From Cecil Beaton's 1920s photos of the "Bright Young Things" to the opulent jewels of Van Cleef & Arpels, five books for the Fashion Forward »

DATE 11/7/2020

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the Music Maven

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the Music Maven

Our staff feels love for these top music books of 2020 »

DATE 11/6/2020

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the New Yorker or the Wanna Be New Yorker

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the New Yorker or the Wanna Be New Yorker

From the NYC Noir of Weegee to Susan Meiselas' found photographs of Little Italy's Tar Beaches, our favorite holiday gift books for those who will always ❤️New York

DATE 11/5/2020

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the Luxury Collector

Holiday Gift Guide 2020: For the Luxury Collector

Whether for a book collector or a lover of limited editions, these deluxe publications make wonderful gifts for those with a taste for the finer things »

DATE 1/18/2021

On Martin Luther King Day, the story behind 'Young, Gifted and Black'

On Martin Luther King Day, the story behind 'Young, Gifted and Black'

How did the message of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. influence Bernard Lumpkin, whose collection forms the basis of the best-selling survey, 'Young, Gifted and Black: A New Generation of Artists'? The story goes back to Lumpkin's father, Oscar James Lumpkin Jr., pictured here with Sarah Benzaquen, Bernard's mother.

DATE 4/7/2020

Read an excerpt from new release 'The Outwardness of Art: Selected Writings of Adrian Stokes'

Read an excerpt from new release 'The Outwardness of Art: Selected Writings of Adrian Stokes'

This week, Ridinghouse releases 'The Outwardness of Art: Selected Writings of Adrian Stokes,' the first comprehensive selection of writings by the noted British art theorist known for his synthesis of aesthetics and psychoanalysis. Edited by Thomas Evans, it is the first broad introduction in almost half a century.

DATE 3/7/2019

Remembering Carolee Schneemann

Remembering Carolee Schneemann

We will miss Carolee Schneemann, fearless performance artist, painter, filmmaker, feminist and innate breaker of taboos. She died this week at the age of 79. In memoriam, we present an excerpt from 'Carolee Schneemann: Uncollected Texts,' published by Primary Information.


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