ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 6/25/2024

LIVE from NYPL presents Michael Stipe launching 'Even the birds gave pause'

DATE 6/22/2024

Artbook at Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore presents Penny Slinger launching and signing 'An Exorcism'

DATE 6/22/2024

Michael Stipe's poetic new photobook

DATE 6/20/2024

Transgression and transformation in Shanay Jhavari's 'Night Fever'

DATE 6/20/2024

picturehouse + thesmalldarkroom present Yelena Yemchuk on 'Malanka'

DATE 6/19/2024

Celebrate Juneteenth with Mickalene Thomas’s unabashed celebration of Black womanhood

DATE 6/17/2024

Jenny Holzer continues to challenge, opaquely, with 'Trace'

DATE 6/16/2024

Celebrate Father's Day with 'What Matters Most'

DATE 6/13/2024

LaToya Ruby Frazier, removing the contradiction between ideals and practice

DATE 6/13/2024

ICP presents Eugene Richards on 'Remembrance Garden'

DATE 6/8/2024

"Next-level otherness" in Pride Month staff pick 'Nick Cave: Forothermore'

DATE 6/6/2024

Celebratory and transgressive, 'John Waters: Pope of Trash' is a Pride Month Staff Pick

DATE 6/3/2024

In Nan Goldin's 'The Other Side,' you are who you pretend to be


RECENT POSTS

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/25/2024

LIVE from NYPL presents Michael Stipe launching 'Even the birds gave pause'

Tuesday, June 25, from 7–8 PM, LIVE from NYPL presents artist and former R.E.M. frontman Michael Stipe discussing his new book of photography, 'Even the birds gave pause,' an exploration of contemporary portraiture, published by Damiani. Book signing to follow.

LACY SOTO | DATE 6/22/2024

Artbook at Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore presents Penny Slinger launching and signing 'An Exorcism'

Join Artbook at Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore Saturday, June 22, at 3 PM PST for the LA book launch of 'An Exorcism: A Photo Romance' with artist Penny Slinger in conversation with writer and filmmaker Jessica Hundley.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/22/2024

Michael Stipe's poetic new photobook

"Portrait, South of France" is from Michael Stipe’s fourth and most recent photobook, Even the birds gave pause, collecting the artist and R.E.M. frontman’s poetic, sometimes enigmatic portraiture in unconventional media. Yes, celebrities show up—Bono, Christy Turlington—because Stipe is documenting his world. But more likely, you’re seeing treasured friends and loved ones portrayed, somehow, at their most themselves. And that is an interesting thing.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/20/2024

picturehouse + thesmalldarkroom present Yelena Yemchuk signing 'Malanka'

Thursday, June 20 at 6 PM, picturehouse + thesmalldarkroom present a talk and signing to celebrate 'Malanka,' Yelena Yemchuk's recent photobook from Edition Patrick Frey. Book signing to follow.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/20/2024

Transgression and transformation in Shanay Jhavari's 'Night Fever'

Featured image, by Chilean photographer Paz Errázuriz’s La Manzana de Adán (Adam’s Apple) series, is from Night Fever: Film and Photography After Dark. Edited by noted Barbican curator Shanay Jhavari, this 424 paperback collects 20 photo portfolios and 21 essays about films made during and about the night. “In the 1980s, Errázuriz photographed sex workers,” Ela Bittencourt writes, “but the women, whose trade was illegal, didn’t want their images shown. She then turned to the siblings Pilar and Evelyn, and so began a four-year collaboration with trans-identifying sex workers in Santiago and the provinces. Working alone at first, she was later joined by journalist Claudia Donoso, who recorded the workers’ testimonies. The resulting book, Adam’s Apple, was censored. Today it serves as a poignant record of a trans community subjected to violence and repression, the vast majority of whom perished from AIDS. Its title references the part of the male anatomy that Errázuriz’s trans subjects often wished to hide. With its biblical ring, it evokes the mysteries of sex, calamity and exhilaration—Edenic scenes portraying perfect bodies of uncanny beauty, tragically marked by fate.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/19/2024

Celebrate Juneteenth with Mickalene Thomas’s unabashed celebration of Black womanhood

"Mama Bush (Your Love Keeps Lifting Me), Higher and Higher" (2009) is reproduced from Mickalene Thomas: All About Love, a staff favorite for both Juneteenth and Pride Month. “According to Thomas, it was making portraits of her mother and herself that allowed her to activate her own self-love,” Claudia Rankine writes. “It is this authentic unfolding that gets communicated to her viewer. The importance of her process mimics the journey we take in the culture as we move through acts of erasure to arrive at Thomas’s glorious embrace. In order for this process to be authentic, Thomas needed to bring Mama Bush along. What was once a question—‘That’s your mama?’—needed to become a statement, one owned by Thomas. In this way, Mama Bush and her daughter Mickalene become the artist’s most important muses. ‘That’s your mama,’ without the question mark, eventually transforms into a new understanding and embrace of who we Black women can be across time and generations. The unabashed intimacy and celebration and love of Black womanhood takes flight in Thomas’s work.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/17/2024

Jenny Holzer continues to challenge, opaquely, with 'Trace'

Featured image is reproduced from Jenny Holzer: Trace, published to accompany the artist’s blockbuster Guggenheim exhibition and full-scale rotunda takeover, Jenny Holzer: Light Line. Whereas the exhibition reimages Holzer’s landmark 1989 installation at the museum, this tactile artist’s book—printed on vellum paper with exposed smyth-sewn binding—features phrases from her powerful Truisms, Living and Survival text series, rendered as drawings, or rubbings, in the style of her iconic stone benches. Alongside the phrase shown here—“You live the surprise results of old plans”—are “Technology will make or break us,” “Use what is dominant in a culture to change it” and “Abuse of power comes as no surprise,” among others.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/16/2024

Celebrate Father's Day with 'What Matters Most'

Featured image is from What Matters Most: Photographs of Black Life—a book of found vintage Polaroids documenting special and mundane moments in Black American life, primarily from the 1970s through the early 2000s. "A great many of the photographs in this collection exhibit a kind of wholesomeness of Black family life—holidays, just-born babies, family reunions, graduations, people and new cars, snapshots of everyday life," Dawn Lundy Martin writes. "A woman lies on a sofa talking into a red telephone receiver. Two middle-aged men play cards on Thanksgiving, 1985. A father gives his son his first haircut in a kitchen. A girl in a white dress sits at a white piano. Even cool cats, ya dig, sign photos 'To Dad with Love.' Like all worthwhile archives, this one refuses wholeness, but instead points us toward what’s outside of the frame and in its corners/off center, what’s missing and what’s singular. It’s in these fissures, peripheries and striking singularities where one might glimpse what I think of as a Black understanding."

PHOTO: Unknown photographer, assembled by Zun Lee, [Man holding girl, sitting in armchair (fist bump)], 1988. Instant print (Polaroid Type 600), 10.8 x 8.8 cm. Art Gallery of Ontario, Fade Resistance Collection, purchase, with funds donated by Martha LA McCain, 2018. Digital image: © Art Gallery of Ontario.


CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/13/2024

ICP presents Eugene Richards on 'Remembrance Garden'

Thursday, June 13, from 6:30–8:30 PM, International Center of Photography presents photographer Eugene Richards speaking and showing work from his latest book, 'Remembrance Garden: A Portrait of Green-Wood Cemetery,' as well as the series 'In This Brief Life.' A lecture by Richards will be followed by an audience Q&A and a book signing in the ICP Cafe.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/13/2024

LaToya Ruby Frazier, removing the contradiction between ideals and practice

Although LaToya Ruby Frazier’s work is revered for its social-activist, Black feminist world-building, certain images are also just great photographs—capable of delivering their message well beyond their original context. “Marilyn Moore, UAW Local 1112, Women’s Committee and Retiree Executive Board, (Youngstown Sheet and Tube Co., Lear Seating Corp., 32 years in at GM Lordstown Complex, Assembly Plant, Van Plant, Metal Fab, Trim Shop), with her General Motors retirement gold ring on her index finger, Youngstown, OH,” from Frazier's 2019 The Last Cruze series, is such an image. “Like the photographer and filmmaker Gordon Parks, Frazier has chosen the radical ‘eye’ of the camera as her weapon against social injustice,” curator and editor Roxana Marcoci writes, later citing Frederick Douglass's March 1865, late Civil War speech, "Pictures and Progress," in which "Douglass emphasized that pictures—a form through which humanity externalizes its thoughts and experiences—have the power to undermine racist authority and offset stereotypical portrayals of African Americans. 'Poets, prophets, and reformers are all picture-makers,' he intoned, 'and this ability is the secret of their power and of their achievements. They see what ought to be by the reflection of what is, and endeavor to remove the contradiction.' Frazier wields the power Douglass identified in pictures to alter the moral orientation of a nation, awakening viewers to myriad crises and daring them ‘to remove the contradiction’ between ideals and practice.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/8/2024

"Next-level otherness" in Pride Month staff pick 'Nick Cave: Forothermore'

Soundsuit (2008) is from Nick Cave: Forothermore, a staff favorite year-round, but also an essential volume in our Pride Month Staff Picks booklist. “In a sense, the dysmorphic physical forms of Cave’s pretty monsters resist a want for racial or gendered assignation,” Romi Crawford writes. “The Soundsuits might therefore be interpreted in terms not unlike those used to describe the status of the Black dandy, who, as Monica L. Miller explains, ‘brought along with him a destabilization of other categories of identity; he was essentially nothing but mixed, a product of interracial relations, a sliding point on the spectrum of gender and sexuality.’ Cave’s objects welcome a state of, and a space for, alternate or next-level otherness, instantiating secure pockets and emplacements that secure gender and racial autonomy and inventiveness.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/6/2024

Celebratory and transgressive, 'John Waters: Pope of Trash' is a Pride Month Staff Pick

Much more than a gay icon, John Waters is a visionary artist, bibliophile and cinephile, as well as a general national treasure. And yet, as we continue to celebrate Pride Month 2024, we certainly can’t fail to feature John Waters: Pope of Trash. Published to accompany the first museum exhibition dedicated solely to Waters’ films—at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles—it’s a must-have compendium of costumes, props, handwritten scripts, concept drawings, correspondence, promotional gimmicks, production photography and other original materials from all of the underground auteur’s features and shorts. In addition, the book spotlights many of Waters' essential longtime collaborators—including Divine, pictured here playing the unrepentant, degenerate criminal Babs Johnson, defending the title of “filthiest person alive” in the indelible 1972 cult film, Pink Flamingos. Scoping out to the mainstream, curator Jenny He notes that in February 1997, Waters guest starred as a gay novelty store owner in the “Homer’s Phobia” episode of The Simpsons. “His role on the network television show—appearing months before Ellen DeGeneres announced, “Yep, I’m gay,” on the cover of Time magazine and her character came out on Ellen in April 1997—was monumental for queer representation in the mainstream cultural landscape.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/3/2024

In Nan Goldin's 'The Other Side,' you are who you pretend to be

"I first saw them—Ivy and Naomi and Colette—crossing the bridge near Morgan Memorial Thriftshop in downtown Boston. They were the most gorgeous creatures I'd ever seen. I was immediately infatuated. I followed them and shot some Super 8 film. That was in 1972. It was the beginning of an obsession that has lasted twenty years.
Soon after, I met them again through David, my closest friend, who had started to do drag. From my first night at The Other Side—the drag queen bar of Boston in the 70s—I came to life. I fell in love with one of the queens and within a few months moved in with Ivy and another friend. I was eighteen and felt like I was a queen too. Completely devoted to my friends, they became my whole world. Part of my worship of them involved photographing them. I wanted to pay homage, to show them how beautiful they were. I never saw them as men dressing as women, but as something entirely different—a third gender that made more sense than either of the other two. I accepted them as they saw themselves; I had no desire to unmask them with my camera. Since my early teens, I'd lived by an Oscar Wilde saying, that you are who you pretend to be. I had enormous respect for the courage my friends had in recreating themselves according to their fantasies…" —Nan Goldin, The Other Side. Featured image is "Picnic on the esplanade, Boston 1973."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/2/2024

Green-Wood Cemetery presents Eugene Richards launching 'Remembrance Garden: A Portrait of Green-Wood Cemetery'

Sunday, June 2, from 1:00–2:30 PM, Brooklyn's Green-Wood Cemetery presents photographer Eugene Richards in conversation with NYC historian Seth Kamil for the launch of 'Remembrance Garden: A Portrait of Green-Wood Cemetery,' published by D.A.P. Richards will also share readings and images from the book, followed by a signing. Please join us in the Historic Chapel!

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/28/2024

'Mickalene Thomas: All About Love,' on view at The Broad

“To see yourself, and for others to see you, is a form of validation. I’m interested in that very mysterious and mystical way we relate to each other in the world.” So Mickalene Thomas is quoted in All About Love, the catalog to the celebrated American artist’s major touring exhibition on view at The Broad in Los Angeles, en route to the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia and the Hayward Gallery in London through 2025. We are proud to have published this vibrant yet scholarly, seductive yet serious book, whose clothbound, image-only cover comes wrapped in a clear vinyl jacket with Thomas’s name printed front and back in gold—the remarkable cover figure’s eyes making direct contact with the beholder. Touching on all aspects of the artist’s work, including painting, collage, print, photography, video and installation, and featuring an interview by Rachel Thomas and essays by a luminary cast including Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Darnell L. Moore, Claudia Rankine, Ed Schad, Renée Mussai and Christine Y. Kim, this is a show-stopping book for any serious art lover’s shelf.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/24/2024

Celebrate Memorial Day weekend with Garry Winogrand's intimate, flashing mirror of America

Featured image, made in White Sands National Monument, New Mexico, 1964, is from Twin Palms Publishers' revelatory 2024 collection of Garry Winogrand’s rarely-seen color photography—culled from more than 45,000 slides made between the early 1950s and the late 1960s. "Winogrand’s color work confronts us with [an] intimate, flashing mirror," editor Michael Almereyda writes, "disclosing yearning and loss within American commotion and plenitude, all the while serving up sharp glimpses of the commonplace—the face of a sleeping boy gilded with Coney Island sand, a young woman’s profile suspended over a half-eaten plate of eggs—that cross into the realm of lyric contemplation.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/24/2024

Beautifully illustrated essays on Arab Modernists

Asim Abu Shakra’s 1988 oil painting on paper, “Garters,” is reproduced from Alcove: Intimate Essays on Arab Modernist Artists, published by Beirut-based Kaph Books. Beautifully designed, clothbound and printed on lovely uncoated paper, this enlightening compendium of testimonies from relatives, friends and students of Arab Modernist artists is authored by Dubai-based writer Myrna Ayad. About his uncle Asim Abu Shakra—originally from Umm Al Fahem in the West Bank of Palestine, but later of Tel Aviv, where his work was celebrated—Karim Abu Shakra writes, “Like the cactus, he was also resilient. The symbol that would become the hallmark of his oeuvre first caught his attention in the early 1980s, when a potted cactus on a neighbor’s windowsill sparked an immediate connection. Like the plant, uprooted from its natural habitat, separated from the rest of its species, and living in isolation in a pot, so too my uncle felt deracinated in Tel Aviv. And, again, in spite of all this, like the potted cactus, he continued to thrive. … For Palestinians, the cactus holds both metaphoric and linguistic meaning: the saber (cactus) was associated with Palestinian farmers and farmland, and was used as a tool for defining land boundaries, largely because of its resistant and robust roots. Saber in spoken Arabic means patience, tenacity and perseverance—qualities that speak directly to the Palestinian identity. The cactus continues to feature in Palestinian art, but in the case of Uncle Asim in particular, the cactus was him.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/19/2024

Of bodies and knowing, in 'Christina Quarles: Collapsed Time'

“We know ourselves as this fragmented jumble of limbs and this kind of code switching that happens throughout our lives and throughout our days,” Christina Quarles is quoted in the new monograph, Collapsed Time. “A lot of the work is trying to tap into that experience of the self, and then, for me, it’s about overlapping that with what it is to be in a racialized body as somebody who’s multiracial and who is half Black but is also half white and is legibly seen as white by white people… The basis of the work is trying to get at what it is to be in a racialized body, to be in a gendered body, to be in a queer body, really to be in any body and the confusing place that that actually is with knowing yourself.” Featured image is Always (Get Me Down) (2021).

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/17/2024

Lee Quiñones signing at Perrotin Store New York

Friday, May 17 from 5 to 7 PM, Perrotin Store New York presents Lee Quiñones signing his new monograph, 'Fifty Years of New York Graffiti Art and Beyond,' published by Damiani. A selection of Quiñones' artworks will be on display.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/17/2024

192 Books presents Robert Storr and Lloyd Wise launching Heni 'Focal Points' series

Friday, May 17 at 6 PM, 192 Books and Paula Cooper Gallery present Robert Storr, author of three new books in the Heni 'Focal Points' series, in conversation with 'Artforum' Executive Editor Lloyd Wise.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/15/2024

A gorgeous new book on Bauhaus textile innovator Otti Berger

In 1937, Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius wrote of radical textile artist Otti Berger, “her work realizes more perfectly than anybody else’s of my followers the peculiar idea of the Bauhaus to work out ready made models for industrial multiplication instead of mere designs on paper.” Featured photograph, of Berger, ca. 1931, is from staff favorite Otti Berger: Weaving for Modernist Architecture—the first comprehensive study of her work. A peer of Anni Albers and Gunta Stölzl, Berger designed upholstery, wall fabrics, curtains and floor coverings with unique weaves and patterns that look as gorgeous and yet as bold and experimental now as they did running up to the Second World War, during which she perished at Auschwitz. The book itself is beautifully produced and illustrated with 500 reproductions from a goldmine of archival materials, alongside important new scholarship by Judith Raum.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/13/2024

Rizzoli Bookstore presents Tony Caramanico and Zack Raffin launching 'Montauk Surf Journals'

Monday, May 13 at 6 PM, Rizzoli Bookstore presents East Coast surf legend Tony Caramanico with surfer and journalist Zack Raffin. They will be in conversation for the launch of Caramanico's new, collage-like artist's book, 'Montauk Surf Journals,' followed by a signing.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/12/2024

Black Feminist World-Building in LaToya Ruby Frazier’s ‘Monuments of Solidarity’

“I am not a carbon copy of anyone, just as you are not a composite of your mother, father, grandparents, siblings or extended relatives. The self-portrait you see—the image of your presence—will be the life you live. Part of the root of the world photograph is phōs, which means ‘light’ or ‘to shine.’ It appears also in the ancient Greek word phōsphóros, which means “bearer of light” or “bringer of light.” To photograph means to draw light. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.” So begins Monuments of Solidarity, the catalog to LaToya Ruby Frazier’s formidable MoMA survey, collecting more than two decades of her rich, empathetic photographic projects dealing with equity in labor, gender relationships, race, environmental justice and health care, to name just a few of the major issues she tackles head on. “Momme” (2008) is from Frazier’s earliest, breakthrough body of work, The Notion of Family (2001–14)—centered around her collapsed steel-milling hometown of Braddock, Pennsylvania, and three generations of African American women including herself, her mother and her grandmother—which she initiated when she was just sixteen years old.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/10/2024

Artbook at MoMA PS1 Bookstore presents Yasmine Ostendorf-Rodríguez and Juan Ferrer on 'Let's Become Fungal!'

Friday, May 10 at 3 PM, Artbook @ MoMA PS1 Bookstore presents a conversation between writer and curator Yasmine Ostendorf-Rodríguez and artist and curator Juan Ferrer in celebration of 'Let’s Become Fungal! Mycelium Teachings and the Arts,' featuring an ambient DJ set with music, words and sounds from the Museo del Hongo's Collection and Archive. Join in person or livestream on Instagram.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/8/2024

The World of Tim Burton in rare, archival materials

“Untitled (Vincent)” (1982) is reproduced from Silvana new release, The World of Tim Burton, featuring 200 color reproductions of rarely or never-before-seen materials—including early sketches from Burton’s childhood, paintings, drawings, photographs, concept art, storyboards, costumes, moving-image works, maquettes, puppets and life-size sculptural installations. “There are directors who build filmographies and others who create worlds,” Giona A. Nazzaro writes. “And others still who consciously, like architects, build cathedrals over time. Among the latter are the likes of Claude Chabrol or Fassbinder. Poetics is the product of a set of recurring signs, obsessions and refrains that enables in its accumulation of evidence a conversation with a filmmaker. Creators of worlds work differently. Poetics—which usually emerges midway through the career of a director, if the premise of the early works is retained—is already all there in that first image, in the first sign (in this sense Bertrand Mandico is the closest director to Tim Burton today). The world itself is motive force to the very existence of their filmmaking. Tim Burton is a creator of worlds.”