ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 2/16/2023

Join Artbook | D.A.P. at the 2023 CAA National Conference

DATE 2/15/2023

The Brooklyn Museum presents the launch of 'Imagining the Future Museum: 21 Dialogues with Architects' by András Szántó

DATE 2/8/2023

'Black American Portraits' opens at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art

DATE 2/5/2023

Join Artbook | D.A.P. at the Winter 2023 Shoppe Object Independent Home and Gift Show

DATE 2/4/2023

Black History Staff Pick: 'Jack Whitten: Cosmic Soul'

DATE 2/1/2023

Black History Month Staff Pick: 'Carrie Mae Weems: A Great Turn in the Possible'

DATE 1/30/2023

Artbook @ MoMA PS1 presents the book celebration and signing of 'Just Above Midtown: Changing Spaces'

DATE 1/29/2023

The power of Black presence in 'Just Above Midtown'

DATE 1/29/2023

Lyrical and exuberant, 'Joseph Stella: Visionary Nature' releases this week

DATE 1/29/2023

The power of Black presence in 'Just Above Midtown'

DATE 1/27/2023

'Elizaveta Porodina: Un/Masked' opens at Fotografiska New York

DATE 1/24/2023

Themes of gender, race, class and social change in 'Events of the Social'

DATE 1/23/2023

Happy New Year from Artbook | D.A.P.!


RECENT POSTS

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 2/16/2023

Join Artbook | D.A.P. at the 2023 CAA National Conference

Join us at Booth 119–120. February 16–18, 2023, for the College Art Association Annual Conference in New York! Browse forthcoming, new and classic academic titles, review our 2023 course adoption recommendations and sign up for free examination copies. We also invite you to join Dancing Foxes press for a Friday, February 17, panel with Marci Kwon, Pamela Lee, Tomie Arai, Ekalan Hou and Julie Ault on 'Hidden in Plain Sight: Selected Writings of Karin Higa,' collecting Higa’s critical work on Asian American art history and the art of Japanese Americans imprisoned in World War II US internment camps.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 2/15/2023

The Brooklyn Museum presents the launch of 'Imagining the Future Museum: 21 Dialogues with Architects' by András Szántó

Wednesday, February 15 at 6:15 PM, Anne Pasternak, Shelby White and Leon Levy present a roundtable launch event for 'Imagining the Future Museum: 21 Dialogues with Architects' authored by András Szántó and published by Hatje Cantz. A noted museum strategist, Szántó will moderate a conversation between Paula Zasnicoff Cardoso of Arquitetos Associado, Elizabeth Diller of Diller Scofidio & Renfro and Kerstin Thompson of Kerstin Thompson Architects.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 2/8/2023

'Black American Portraits' opens at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art

Forever—Bisa Butler's quilted and appliquéd 2020 tribute to the revered American actor Chadwick Boseman (1976–2020)—is reproduced from Black American Portraits, published to accompany the exhibition currently on view in Atlanta. Presenting more than 140 works from the LACMA collection, this is a celebratory, kaleidoscopic chronicle of the many ways in which Black Americans have used portraiture to envision themselves over the past two centuries—from the earliest aspects of the Civil Rights Movement to Black Lives Matter. "Each time you return to this volume," Naima J. Keith writes, "we challenge you to interrogate the systems and injustices that have made—and continue to make—this work necessary and important. We hope the myriad of diverse and moving pieces allows you to imagine a future where Black excellence and joy are not simply responses to the brutal and needless murder of Black people, but standard features of our collective daily existence."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 2/5/2023

Join Artbook | D.A.P. at the Winter 2023 Shoppe Object Independent Home and Gift Show

Join us February 5–7, 2023, from 9AM–6PM EST for the Winter 2023 Shoppe Object Independent Home and Gift Show—the pride of New York’s Winter Market Week, highlighting nothing but the very best in home and gift—at Pier 36 in downtown Manhattan!

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 2/4/2023

Black History Staff Pick: 'Jack Whitten: Cosmic Soul'

Featured spreads are from Jack Whitten: Cosmic Soul, Richard Shiff's definitive exploration of the important American painter's artistic and spiritual practice. If you want to understand Whitten, this deeply personal art historical deep-dive is literally essential—both a gorgeously designed and produced labor of love and a complete, searching excavation. A sample passage reads, Whitten "received verbal instruction from a coded soundtrack originating not in a jazz club or a recording studio but somewhere in the cosmos, coming from an 'unknown voice from the universe.' Imaginary or real, it hardly matters. Whitten had a way of turning from one field of human endeavor to another, from one mentality to another, without resorting to any customary devices of transition. In his thought, disparate concepts converged. If he had been a poet, we would have called his verbalizations poetry; but he was describing the manipulation of materials in a painter’s studio. 'I practice thought experiments in abstract painting. Thought experiments save time and allow me to do celestial navigation, i.e., I can travel anywhere I want without the encumbrance of matter.'"

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 2/1/2023

Black History Month Staff Pick: 'Carrie Mae Weems: A Great Turn in the Possible'

Featured spreads are from A Great Turn in the Possible, the beautifully produced catalog to the artist's recent mid-career retrospective at Fundación MAPFRE in Barcelona. Presenting works from all of Weems' important series—from her early Family Pictures and Stories (1978–84) to her seminal Kitchen Table Series (1990) to her very recent Seat or Stand and Speak (2021)—this is the most comprehensive survey of Weems’ genre-defying oeuvre yet published and the perfect start to our celebration of books that honor Black History. Weems "has always been prompted by her drive to rescue untold stories and their protagonists from oblivion into the public sphere, and to subvert the powers that marginalized or silenced those stories and their agents in the first place," Elvira Dyangani Ose writes. "Like [Toni] Morrison, Weems encourages herself and others to take ownership of their narratives and, especially on behalf of and for subjects like herself—women, working-class and Black—to articulate and reimagine the accounts of lives that have never been sufficiently valued or narrated with the esteem and rigor that the artist would have wanted; or not sufficiently, anyway, to offer the guarantee of once and for all destroying the racial prejudices so heavily rooted in the United States’ sociopolitical psyche and popular imaginary."

CHEEYEON PARK | DATE 1/30/2023

Artbook @ MoMA PS1 presents the book celebration and signing of 'Just Above Midtown: Changing Spaces'

Monday, January 30, at 4 PM, Artbook @ MoMA PS1 Bookstore presents the book celebration and signing of 'Just Above Midtown: Changing Spaces,' published by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and The Studio Museum in Harlem on the occasion of the exhibition at MoMA on view through February 18, 2023. Please join us for a round table conversation with Linda Goode Bryant, Kimberly Varella, Thomas (T.) Jean Lax and Lilia Rocio Taboada. RSVP is required due to limited capacity.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/29/2023

The power of Black presence in 'Just Above Midtown'

Featured spreads are from MoMA's superb document, Just Above Midtown: Changing Spaces—the first major excavation of JAM, Linda Goode Bryant's 1974–86 gallery and "laboratory for experimentation" centered around Black artists. To be celebrated with a panel talk Monday, January 30, at Artbook @ MoMA PS1, this historic volume is filled with artworks, documentary photographs, archival documents, ephemera, essential timelines, essays, an interview between Linda Goode Bryant and Thelma Golden and statements by the artists, volunteers, collectors and cultural collaborators who made JAM an NYC landmark. In her interview with Golden, Goode Bryant sums it up: "Every day, I'm bowled over by the resourcefulness, imagination and creativity of Black folk. And I've always just wanted to be around that, to be part of that, to support that. There's so much that we're faced with that can cause us to doubt ourselves or to think we don't exist except as the flip side of a black-and-white coin. And I just go, 'No, look at our beauty and amazingness. How can you even doubt that?' I feel that these days—and I'm ancient now, so it could be generational—there's a notion that Black exists in the absence of white, and that's bullshit. Black exists in the presence of Blackness. We exist—what we are, who we are, our power—in our presence, not in the absence of white folks."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/29/2023

Lyrical and exuberant, 'Joseph Stella: Visionary Nature' releases this week

"Tree of My Life" (1919) is reproduced from Joseph Stella: Visionary Nature, the first major monograph on the nature-based paintings of the pioneering American modernist whose work is normally associated with Futurism. The result of an important epiphany, "Tree of My Life" marks the beginning of Stella’s exploration of nature and the centering of his Italian identity in his work. He describes the moment of breakthrough: "a new light broke over me… . Unexpectedly, from the sudden unfolding of blue distances of my youth in Italy, a great clarity announced PEACE—proclaimed the luminous dawn of A NEW ERA."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/29/2023

The power of Black presence in 'Just Above Midtown'

Featured spreads are from MoMA's superb document, Just Above Midtown: Changing Spaces—the first major excavation of JAM, Linda Goode Bryant's 1974–86 gallery and "laboratory for experimentation" centered around Black artists. To be celebrated with a panel talk Monday, January 30, at Artbook @ MoMA PS1, this historic volume is filled with artworks, documentary photographs, archival documents, ephemera, essential timelines, essays, an interview between Linda Goode Bryant and Thelma Golden and statements by the artists, volunteers, collectors and cultural collaborators who made JAM an NYC landmark. In her interview with Golden, Goode Bryant sums it up: "Every day, I'm bowled over by the resourcefulness, imagination and creativity of Black folk. And I've always just wanted to be around that, to be part of that, to support that. There's so much that we're faced with that can cause us to doubt ourselves or to think we don't exist except as the flip side of a black-and-white coin. And I just go, 'No, look at our beauty and amazingness. How can you even doubt that?' I feel that these days—and I'm ancient now, so it could be generational—there's a notion that Black exists in the absence of white, and that's bullshit. Black exists in the presence of Blackness. We exist—what we are, who we are, our power—in our presence, not in the absence of white folks."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/27/2023

'Elizaveta Porodina: Un/Masked' opens at Fotografiska New York

What makes the photographs in Elizaveta Porodina: Un/Masked so special? It’s hard to say. And yet, have a look. Best known for her penetrating, emotionally-charged magazine work, the Russian-born, Munich-based photographer was educated as a clinical psychologist. Only in her thirties, Porodina has produced a body of work that manages to provoke both delight and mystery, curiosity and discomfort. T magazine editor Coco Romack calls Porodina’s work melancholy and eerie. The "twist of beauty’s familiar forms into the uncanny is a trademark for Porodina," Romack writes. Her references include "the collages of the Surrealist artist Max Ernst, as well as the bold colors and ‘sinister messages,’ as she calls them, of Italian giallo horror films." Featured image is "Carolina Herrera IV (Mao), Paris" (2021). Elizaveta Porodina: Un/Masked is on view at Fotografiska New York January 27 through April 30, 2023.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/24/2023

Themes of gender, race, class and social change in 'Events of the Social'

Zanele Muholi's indelible 2006 portrait, Martin Machapa, is reproduced from new release Events of the Social: Portraiture and Collective Agency, featuring 117 color and 115 black-and-white photographs from the world-renowned Walther Collection. Gathering work by three generations of artists—including Sammy Baloji, Jodi Bieber, Mimi Cherono Ng’ok, Alfred Martin Duggan-Cronin, David Goldblatt, Seydou Keïta, Malick Sidibé, Mikhael Subotzky and Muholi, among others—this volume presents a group of artists who can be seen as "agents of a postmodern paradigm shift" towards "biopolitical reflections, neocolonial critiques, gender-right advocations, ritual reactivations, multi-species theories, and political calls to action through the will of the collective," according to editor and curator Elvira Dyangani Ose.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/23/2023

'Hilma af Klint: Artist, Researcher, Medium' is Back in Stock!

Given the general state of things, we wanted to get this week off to a good start. Thus, "Group 8, No. 2" (1913), from Hatje Cantz's popular yet scholarly overview, Hilma af Klint: Artist, Researcher, Medium. “In order to liberate oneself from prevailing truths and opinions, one has to dare to leave safe ground,” Moderna Museet curator Iris Müller-Westermann writes. “Time and again throughout her life af Klint was prepared to take that risk. Although she kept copious notes in which she tried to put what she experienced into context, it is the images that constitute the essential message that she has left behind. They are powerful, remarkable, radical images. At first glance, many of them seem very simple, but in interaction with each other they reveal their complexity. It would be pointless to directly translate the symbols and letters that appear in af Klint’s work into verbal meaning. They always have to be seen in relation to the whole. Symbols are like doors to other dimensions. Hilma af Klint’s fascinating images that generate such a great deal of interest today, one hundred years after their creation, invite us to go on a journey into another dimension—an inward journey, which is simultaneously also a journey outwards, beyond.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/21/2023

Deborah Bell presents Elaine Mayes and Kevin Moore on 'The Haight-Ashbury Portraits'

Saturday, January 21 at 3 PM, Deborah Bell Photographs presents a conversation with photographer Elaine Mayes and editor Kevin Moore about the exhibition and Damiani publication, 'The Haight-Ashbury Portraits 1967–1968.' Reception and book signing to follow.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/21/2023

Into the meat grinder

Featured spreads are from new release Cary Loren: Polaroids, published by Edition Patrick Frey. Collecting photos of the legendary Detroit-based Destroy All Monsters founder and Book Beat bookstore owner's collage work, assemblages and snapshots of his 1970s entourage, this book also comes printed with three different covers and an interview with artist Cameron Jamie, conducted in several cemeteries beside the graves of Loren’s idols. Jamie comments, "Your collage work has always had this sense of wickedness warping low and pop culture imagery. It’s like putting images into a meat grinder to mash up and reshape them by cooking them into another setting of your own by retelling and rewriting a story," then later asks, "Do you find your work beautiful?" Loren responds, "There’s this balance of the world I’m trying to create and resolve. I’m trying to achieve something of what I think is an artificial kind of beauty, yeah."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/19/2023

McNally Jackson Books Seaport and Primary Information present Mirene Arsanios, Constance DeJong and Annie-B Parson

Thursday, January 19 at 7 PM, McNally Jackson Books Seaport and Primary Information present a reading and discussion with Mirene Arsanios, Constance DeJong and Annie-B Parson. Drawing from their interdisciplinary and experimental approaches to performance, choreography, language, translation and fiction, Arsanios, DeJong and Parson will read from selected work, opening onto a discussion moderated by Rachel Valinsky.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/19/2023

Humanity, depth and insight in 'Peter Hujar Curated by Elton John'

Featured spreads are from Peter Hujar Curated by Elton John, Fraenkel Gallery's exquisitely produced monograph on the influential but (in his lifetime) underrecognized photographer who captured the downtown NYC demimonde in striking black-and-white from the age of twenty-three, in 1957, until his death from complications related to AIDS, in 1987, at the age of just fifty-three. Assembled by noted photography collector Elton John, this volume includes portraits of friends, lovers, performers, cultural figures, landscapes and animals. Pictured here: "Beauregard's Dog Pilar" (1983), "Ethyl Eichelberger as Auntie Belle Emme" (1979) and "June Newton, Paris" (1980). "Hujar's humanity, depth and sensual insight aren't for everyone, and don't need to be," Elton John writes, "but once his pictures get into your bloodstream they are impossible to shake."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/18/2023

Amy Sherald, infusing the present and the future with hope

Featured spreads are from new release Amy Sherald: The World We Make, the first major monograph on the renowned portraitist, who has said that her eyes "search for people who are and who have the kind of light that provides the present and the future with hope." Certainly, after the monumental challenges of the past few years—in America, and around the world—more of this direct, recognizable kind of hope is what we want and need. In his essay, In Praise of Mere Beauty, Kevin Quashie takes the impact of Sherald's work further: "Amy Sherald’s work insists on mere beauty, a quiet, pulsing, just-there beauty. In advancing this phrase, I write in acknowledgment of Sherald’s artistic fineness, to praise her virtuosic skill as well as to gesture toward the sheer impact of encountering frame after frame of blackness: mere beauty as a proxy toward mere being, which has its own politic. Indeed, the very idea of mere beauty as idiom for viewing blackness responds to the world’s incapacity to appreciate blackness exactly that way. For me, a black viewer, there is something magical enacted in looking at this mere beauty, where I am saturated by seeing and not seeing myself, this process of abstracting and of multiplying that is at play in all art, even as the terms of antiblackness would seek to reduce black art—and black encounters with black art—to a lesser intelligence. Again, Amy Sherald’s aesthetic is one of mere beauty—a dynamic ordinary rendering of an approximation of a moment of life, a capable quality of light for such rendering, an invitation to try to behold blackness presented in such exquisite color."

LACY SOTO | DATE 1/15/2023

Artbook @ Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore presents Frances Stark & Anthony Graham on 'Alexis Smith: The American Way'

Sunday, January 15 at 2 PM, Artbook @ Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore presents the book launch of 'Alexis Smith: The American Way.' LA artist Frances Stark and MCASD curator Anthony Graham will discuss the work of Alexis Smith.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/12/2023

Pure Couture

Featured image—of Gianfranco Ferré's 1989 Vincennes evening gown for Christian Dior—is reproduced from Delpire & Co.'s evocative new three-volume visual history of the French fashion house as imagined by contemporary photographer Sarah Moon. The first volume, starring "timeless" Majorcan model Andrea Gutiérrez, presents Dior's original work, 1947 to 1957, shot in luminous black-and-white. The second volume, introducing subtle color, explores the Dior archives, with designs by Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferré, John Galliano, Raf Simons and current creative director Maria Grazia. Volume three presents 38 photographs made in dialogue with Chiuri. "Sarah Moon’s personal style, it seems to me, rests in her ability to give shape to unconscious movements and self-reflexive intuitions," Chiuri writes, "her ability to express, through her images, feelings and moods that words struggle to describe.… For me her shifting, intimate atmosphere, suspended in time, is such a fitting visual representation of my constant travels between the past and the present, through which I create images for the future. There is something truly special, magical, in these images, an interweaving of the vision of the house of Dior, which has always sought to interpret and represent the contemporary woman, and the feminine vision of Sarah Moon, imperfect, permeable and charged with emotion."

IMAGE CREDIT: Vincennes, Gianfranco Ferré for Christian Dior. Evening gown, Autumn/Winter 1989 © Sarah Moon


CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/12/2023

'Byways' Book Signing with Oscar-Winning Cinematographer Sir Roger A. Deakins

Sunday, January 29 at 1PM PST, the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures presents Oscar-winning cinematographer Sir Roger A. Deakins signing his new book, 'Byways,' published by Damiani Books.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/10/2023

Why Omaha?

Featured image is from one-of-a-kind new release, Darius Koehli : Why Omaha? Collecting 150 glorious, action-packed Kodak Instamatic snapshots that the then-nine-year-old Swiss-born photographer made at American Wrestling Association matches during the summer of 1969, which he spent with his father in Omaha, Nebraska, this 114-page hardcover captures a "fascinating, illustrious universe" with all of the unselfconscious vitality and curiosity of a kid caught somewhere between slapstick and baffling heroism. "Memories rise up in my mind," Koehli writes, "the old photographs tell of rousing battles, stuffy arenas and lurid announcers, excited crowds hooting and hollering, sweat and blood, mysterious masked accomplices and steely bodies. Magical names, magical images—welcome to a world long forgotten… Welcome back to Omaha 1969!"

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/10/2023

Join us at the Atlanta Gift & Home Market 2023

Tuesday, January 10–Monday, January 16, 2023, please join Artbook | D.A.P. in the Aesthetic Movement Showroom at the Atlanta Gift Market to view a curated selection of new books on art and culture for Spring 2023!

LACY SOTO | DATE 1/8/2023

Artbook @ Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore presents George Byrne and Rosecrans Baldwin

Sunday, January 8 at 3 PM, Artbook @ Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore presents a book signing and conversation with 'Post Truth' photographer George Byrne and 'Everything Now: Lessons from the City-State of Los Angeles' author Rosecrans Baldwin.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/7/2023

Radical—or timely—ideas from the Japanese philosopher who anticipated cryptocurrency

This week, as we acknowledge the anniversary of the January 6 insurrection, we watch House Republicans struggle to elect a Speaker, and as global cryptocurrency dramas unfold before our eyes, we are reminded of the monumental problems we face, and have always faced, as a society. Perhaps there is something to be learned from new release, Above All Waves: Wisdom from Tominaga Nakamoto, the Philosopher Rumored to Have Inspired Bitcoin, published by Badlands Unlimited, the provocative philosophical imprint founded by artist Paul Chan—whose ink drawings illustrate the spreads. "It has always been, since ancient times, that those who teach the Way and make laws have tried to disprove their predecessors and justify their own doctrines by claiming allegiance to even older ancestors. This is a very obvious tendency, but later generations who are unaware of this fact naturally become misled." Also: "Each school of thought recites and passes on its own style of expression that it has named. Foolish people fail to understand this. Each believe their teaching is the Way of Truth, reason in error, and fight each other about whether or not their way is right. I feel sorry for them, for they seem to me to be clueless and ridiculous at the same time." And "Never underestimate the dumb."