ARTBOOK LOGO

ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 8/3/2020

In 'Jordan Casteel: Within Reach,' fundamental and expansive humanity

DATE 8/2/2020

Pat de Groot captures nothing or everything in summertime staff favorite, 'Landscape Painting Now'

DATE 8/1/2020

Artbook @ Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore presents a virtual launch event for 'The World's Worst: A Guide to the Portsmouth Sinfonia'

DATE 7/31/2020

From hair lacquer to whiskey and sweat in Karlheinz Weinberger, 'Together & Alone'

DATE 7/29/2020

Symbols are like doors to other dimensions in 'Hilma af Klint: Artist, Researcher, Medium'

DATE 7/28/2020

On Marcel Duchamp's birthday, a spectacular treat

DATE 7/26/2020

Back in Stock! 'William Eggleston: Election Eve'

DATE 7/24/2020

Questions of power and identity in 'Samuel Fosso: Autoportrait'

DATE 7/21/2020

July 22, 1971, from 'Bernadette Mayer: Memory'

DATE 7/18/2020

Darkness and hope in 'Philip Guston Now'

DATE 7/17/2020

Carlo McCormick on 'Writing the Future: Basquiat and the Hip-Hop Generation'

DATE 7/16/2020

5 Essential Books on Jean-Michel Basquiat

DATE 7/15/2020

In 'The Atmosphere of Crime,' Gordon Parks foreshadows the brutality of today's prison system and current demands for equal rights, access and justice

DATE 7/13/2020

In 'Lines,' Shantell Martin seeks to understand "who we are at the core, as people"

DATE 7/12/2020

In celebration of Buckminster Fuller's 125th birthday, a new facsimile of the cult cookbook, 'Synergetic Stew'

DATE 7/12/2020

Celebrate the radical optimism of Buckminster Fuller during the month of his birth 125 years ago!

DATE 7/9/2020

Jeff Divine's 70s Surf Photographs tell it like it was

DATE 7/7/2020

Profound questions about space, time and material in Julia Christensen's 'Upgrade Available'

DATE 7/5/2020

'John Cage: A Mycological Foray—Variations on Mushrooms' is here at last!

DATE 7/4/2020

On Independence Day 2020, we remember Robert Frank, "tragic poet" and author of the seminal photography book "The Americans"

DATE 7/3/2020

Relaxed mastery in the "Afternoon Paintings" of Stanley Whitney

DATE 7/1/2020

RIP Milton Glaser

DATE 6/30/2020

See Book Reviews, Trailers and Flip-Through Videos on our new YouTube Channel!

DATE 6/26/2020

Ecstasy and celebration in 'Mechanical Fantasy Box: The Homoerotic Journal of Patrick Cowley'

DATE 6/25/2020

'Berenice Abbott: Portraits of Modernity' is a Pride Month Pick from Fundacíon Mapfre

DATE 6/19/2020

Pieces of life and shards of history in 'Melvin Edwards: Lynch Fragments'

DATE 6/19/2020

“That’s what art is; we’re the art!”

DATE 6/17/2020

Kader Attia represents the unrepresented in 'Landing Strip'

DATE 6/15/2020

240 pages of remarkable trans art in 'Kiss My Genders'

DATE 6/14/2020

'Alvin Baltrop: The Piers' is a Staff Pick for Pride Month

DATE 6/12/2020

Nicole R. Fleetwood on Mickalene Thomas's world making

DATE 6/11/2020

In 'Ellen Gallagher: Accidental Records' radical aesthetic possibilities emerge from seismic cracks in the surface of things

DATE 6/8/2020

Power and Poetry: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on Gordon Parks and Muhammad Ali

DATE 6/5/2020

Taking inspiration in the quilts, paintings and political posters of Faith Ringgold

DATE 6/3/2020

David Hammons in 'Soul of a Nation'

DATE 6/1/2020

Celebrate LGBTQ Pride!

DATE 5/31/2020

Summertime Fun Staff Picks

DATE 5/30/2020

Powerful 'Bernadette Mayer: Memory' is new from Siglio Press

DATE 5/28/2020

Staff favorite 'Hello Muddah, Hello Faddah' evokes sunscreen and wood cabins, feathered hair and tube socks

DATE 5/27/2020

Beautiful and voyeuristic. Tosh Berman reviews 'Weegee's Naked City'

DATE 5/25/2020

Tosh Berman on 'The World's Worst: A Guide to the Portsmouth Sinfonia'—a new adventure in its highest form

DATE 5/24/2020

Memorial Day Staff Pick: Ice Cream Headaches

DATE 5/23/2020

Summertime Staff Favorite 'Cape Cod Modern' is back in stock!

DATE 5/21/2020

'Oscar Wilde's Italian Dream' is new from Damiani

DATE 5/18/2020

In 'JB Blunk,' art, life and spirituality fully merge

DATE 5/15/2020

Need a little wit & daring in your so-called life? Here are four weekend activities that will liberate your spirit & open your mind

DATE 5/15/2020

Listen to 'The World’s Worst' Playlist

DATE 5/15/2020

Kyle Meyer's astonishing 'Interwoven' blends Swazi craft with digital photography

DATE 5/13/2020

In 'Genesis Breyer P-Orridge: Sacred Intent,' three decades of revolutionary thought, action and spirit

DATE 5/12/2020

'Hilma af Klint: Visionary' is Back in Stock!

DATE 5/12/2020

DelMonico Books Partners with Artbook | D.A.P.


RECENT POSTS

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 8/3/2020

In 'Jordan Casteel: Within Reach,' fundamental and expansive humanity

"Miles and Jojo" (2014) is reproduced from Jordan Casteel: Within Reach, published to accompany the exhibition currently on hiatus at the New Museum. "There is power in the gaze," Dawould Bey writes. "Throughout history, black people have been killed for directing their gaze at the wrong—usually white—person; such an assertion of empowered exchange was an extreme violation of the enforced social contract that was meant to keep black people 'in their place.' Jordan is aware of this, and in her paintings, the subject and viewer share a reciprocal gaze, creating a momentary exchange that potentially extends from the object out into the larger social world, with all the capacities for transformed social relations implied by that gesture. Ultimately, Jordan's paintings create a space in which we see can acknowledge each other, in which black people are able to see themselves mirrored in her ambitious material reimaginings. In the fraught times we are living through, this ability to calmly look each other in the eye and recognize a fundamental and expansive humanity staring back may be what we need more than anything."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 8/2/2020

Pat de Groot captures nothing or everything in summertime staff favorite, 'Landscape Painting Now'

Pat de Groot's "spring blue" (2001) is reproduced from Landscape Painting Now, one of our summer-time staff favorites. De Groot's paintings "can seem almost abstract," Barry Schwabsky writes, "but as she has said, 'They are done from what is happening: the color, the wave action, the wind, the sky and the horizon,' and for that reason, 'I have to move with the changes until I get something that looks pretty much all right.' In some of these paintings, we could be looking at nothing, or everything—but nothing in between."

LACY SOTO | DATE 8/1/2020

Artbook @ Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore presents a virtual launch event for 'The World's Worst: A Guide to the Portsmouth Sinfonia'

Saturday, August 8 at 5 PM, join Artbook @ Hauser & Wirth LA Bookstore and Soberscove Press for a live stream with editors Christopher M. Reeves and Aaron Walker, in conversation with Tosh Berman, discussing the book 'The World's Worst: A Guide to the Portsmouth Sinfonia.' This event is free with registration.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/31/2020

From hair lacquer to whiskey and sweat in Karlheinz Weinberger, 'Together & Alone'

Featured image is reproduced from Karlheinz Weinberger: Photographs, Together & Alone, the Song Cave’s highly anticipated new release, coinciding with an exhibition of the same work at Situations Gallery, opening Saturday, August 1, on the lower east side. Collecting more than 200 never-before-published vintage photographs that were rediscovered in 2017, this volume includes pictures of Weinberger’s famous teenage Swiss “rebels” of the late 1950s and early 1960s, shot outside at carnivals and camp sites, alongside very direct but also strange nude male portraits from the late 1950s through the mid-1970s, which Weinberger somehow managed to make in a studio he’d set up in the apartment he shared with his mother. “Weinberger’s early images smell of hair lacquer and the later ones smell of whiskey and sweat,” Collier Schorr writes in her excellent introduction. “The latent adolescence of the closeted homosexual gives way to manhood. In a sense they—photographer and subjects—grew up together.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/29/2020

Symbols are like doors to other dimensions in 'Hilma af Klint: Artist, Researcher, Medium'

“No. 9, Old Age” (1907)—from Hilma af Klint’s iconic Ten Largest series—is reproduced from Artist, Researcher, Medium, the newest publication on Sweden’s pioneering cosmonaut of inner space. Published to accompany a major exhibition that has finally opened to the public after months of corona-related delays at Malmö’s esteemed Moderna Museet, this volume investigates the ways that af Klint linked her painting to a higher consciousness. “In order to liberate oneself from prevailing truths and opinions, one has to dare to leave safe ground,” curator Iris Müller-Westermann writes. “Time and again throughout her life af Klint was prepared to take that risk. Although she kept copious notes in which she tried to put what she experienced into context, it is the images that constitute the essential message that she has left behind. They are powerful, remarkable, radical images. At first glance, many of them seem very simple, but in interaction with each other they reveal their complexity. It would be pointless to directly translate the symbols and letters that appear in af Klint’s work into verbal meaning. They always have to be seen in relation to the whole. Symbols are like doors to other dimensions. Hilma af Klint’s fascinating images that generate such a great deal of interest today, one hundred years after their creation, invite us to go on a journey into another dimension—an inward journey, which is simultaneously also a journey outwards, beyond.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/28/2020

On Marcel Duchamp's birthday, a spectacular treat

Today we're celebrating the birth of Marcel Duchamp, July 28, 1887, with a fresh shipment of Boîte-en-valise, the exquisitely made facsimile reinterpretation of Duchamp's famous "Box in a Valise"—more commonly known as his museum in a suitcase—originally produced between 1935 and 1941 in an edition of 300. Originally housed in a leather suitcase with 69 replicated miniature artworks at scale—including such seminal pieces as "Fountain," "Nude Descending a Staircase" and the "Large Glass"—this new edition from editor Mathieu Mercier is one of our most highly sought-after limited editions—back in stock and already rare. Stock is limited, alas.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/26/2020

Back in Stock! 'William Eggleston: Election Eve'

“Bank parking lot, Plains” is reproduced from William Eggleston: Election Eve, Steidl’s superb volume gathering 100 photographs that Eggleston shot in and around Plains, Georgia (en route from Mississippi), just prior to the 1976 Presidential election, when Democrat Jimmy Carter of Georgia defeated incumbent Republican President Gerald Ford from Michigan. “On the eve of the election, when nothing had yet been decided, when everything—whatever that everything was—hung in the balance, Eggleston made an elegy … a statement of perfect calm,” Lloyd Fonvielle writes. “To say, however, that these photographs are romantic, sorrowful and quiet is not to imply that they are easy or in any sense comforting. They are richer and more sensual in some ways than Eggleston’s other work, but they are not less penetrating or unsettling. In them Eggleston seems bent, as always, on recording those unremarked units of spatial perception by which the everyday world is unconsciously ordered.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/24/2020

Questions of power and identity in 'Samuel Fosso: Autoportrait'

Featured image, from Samuel Fosso’s 2008 African Spirits series, is reproduced from Autoportrait, a new release from Steidl and the Walther Collection, New York, and the first comprehensive survey of the artist's work. Since the 1970s, Fosso’s self-portraiture and performance have challenged identity in the postcolonial era. In this series in particular, Fosso takes on historic images of 1960s revolutionaries, from Kwame Nkrumah and Nelson Mandela to Angela Davis and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.. In an interview with Okwui Enwezor, Fosso discusses the underlying concept of African Spirits. “While all the series I have done can be understood by viewers as discrete and self-contained, and therefore different, to me there is one unifying theme behind all of them—and that is the question of power. I am particularly interested in the role that slavery played in the history of Africa… I see slavery as connected to all these questions of freedom, liberation, colonialism and power. To me, slavery was the source, and I wanted to deal with it in a really deep way. My goal was to restage key images and figures in this history from King during the American civil rights movement to Kwame Nkrumah, Léopold Sédar Senghor, and Aimé Césaire during the independence and liberation of Africa. To my mind, all these struggles had one thing in common, and that is the history of slavery. And these figures were committed to the idea of freedom for black people in order to reclaim their culture and human dignity.”

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/21/2020

July 22, 1971, from 'Bernadette Mayer: Memory'

Featured image is one of 1,100 photographs taken by Bernadette Mayer during the month of July, 1971. These have been collected in Memory, the new Siglio book collecting this body of work, alongside two hundred pages of text and six hours of audio recording that Mayer made as part of the project. The corresponding entry for July 22 begins: "To burn to be sharp to drive to nourish to choke to breathe, last week in 1850, to bind to increase to bend to cover to vault over to shine to seize to take hold of, last week in 1850, to cut to hide to shut to lean, last week in 1850, to hold to run to turn round to cultivate to cook to give to show to tame to lead to eat to live to exist to put to place to speak, last week in 1850…” To hear contemporary poets read from the book, by day, throughout July 2020, please visit Language is a Temptation: Daily Readings from Bernadette Mayer's 'Memory' at Poets House. The reader for July 22 is Fanny Howe.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/18/2020

Darkness and hope in 'Philip Guston Now'

Featured spreads are reproduced from Philip Guston Now, the definitive retrospective published to accompany the exhibition currently on hiatus at the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC, and traveling to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Tate Modern and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. "Be warned," NGADC curator Harry Cooper writes. "Guston's is not a sunny art. There is a moment on film where he uses the word 'happy' almost by accident and then repeats it in disgust, spitting it out. That he endured personal traumas and took the traumas of the twentieth century to heart is evident in most of the images in this volume, if you look closely. But even in its darkest moments and seen in the darkest light, his art can be beautiful and even hopeful. His refusal to withdraw, his insistence on bearing witness to what was happening inside himself and out, was a kind of faith… Guston's work seems to inhabit a present tense, addressing us in the moment. Whether it is the freshness of the paint itself, the directness of the handling, the power of the image, or something undefinable, we feel that the work could have been done yesterday. Or just now."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/17/2020

Carlo McCormick on 'Writing the Future: Basquiat and the Hip-Hop Generation'

Jean-Michel Basquiat's "In Italian" (1983) is reproduced from Writing the Future: Basquiat and the Hip-Hop Generation, one of the most vibrant exhibition catalogs of the year, and maybe the decade. An exploration of how hip-hop culture and graffiti electrified the art of Jean-Michel Basquiat and his contemporaries in 1980s New York, "this is the story of the stories that were told, with tremendous urgency and at great peril, when no one seemed to listen or to care what these kids had to say," Carlo McCormick writes in his superb essay. 'It’s about a time, long ago now for even those of us who lived through it, when fantastical urban myths were spun and legends were born. Yes, it’s about the fame of Jean-Michel Basquiat, Fab 5 Freddy’s social fabrics, Futura’s atmospheric attacks, the cult hero Lee, and the equation known as Rammellzee. It’s also about the diverse evolution of graffiti into a radical ornamentation of Gothic Futurism as well as the kind of visual poetics and narrative force unleashed when a relatively few graffiti writers understood they could say so much more than their names. But it is also about the conversation and connectivity that spun a web of intricate social interface and influence within a small but dense creative community over a remarkably short period of time. It’s about how the word was spread and splayed, transmitted, transmuted and transgressed along the way into a wild style of rapid and radical hybridity. If history does rhyme but not repeat, let’s try to imagine how a generation set loose on the dance floor–street corner–playground could suddenly find a shared beat and mutual dialect with the gatekeepers of high art in the 1980s. Individuals may assert their singularity—their individual class, race, identity—but in the density of the city at this moment, they moved together."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/15/2020

In 'The Atmosphere of Crime,' Gordon Parks foreshadows the brutality of today's prison system and current demands for equal rights, access and justice

"Crime Suspect with Gun, Chicago, Illinois" (1957) is reproduced from Gordon Parks: The Atmosphere of Crime, 1957, the topic of a live MoMA Virtual Views Q&A discussion with Sarah Meister, Nicole Fleetwood and Khalil Muhammad on Thursday, July 16 at 8PM EDT. "In this short series for Life, shot over six weeks and consisting of a few dozen images, Parks deftly captured the processes of criminalization, policing, arrest, and imprisonment," Fleetwood writes. "His photos allowed readers in the 1950s (and permit contemporary audiences) to see the steps along these processes—complete with officers on their beat looking for suspicious activity, the shakedown of criminal suspects, the administrative procedures of arrest and fingerprinting, and finally the bars and walls of prison, in this case San Quentin in California… Parks’s photographs foreshadow what will unfold in the coming decades, as civil rights activists and social movements make greater demands for equal rights, access, and justice, and as policing grows more aggressive and prisons more punitive. Seeing these images, we might ask what lessons we can learn from The Atmosphere of Crime to address the massive and brutal prison system we have inherited."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/13/2020

In 'Lines,' Shantell Martin seeks to understand "who we are at the core, as people"

Featured image—of Shantell Martin in her Broadway studio customizing a limited-edition bicycle for Martone Cycling Co. in 2015—is reproduced from Lines, Heni's beautifully-produced new monograph on the artist known around the world for her iconic black-and-white line drawings. "The distinct character of Shantell Martin’s line resonates across her work, whether this line is drawn on paper, the wall or an object, and whether it is found in the art gallery, in the classroom, on stage in a club or on the catwalk of a fashion show," Katharine Stout writes. "Martin’s line is a line of enquiry into the endless possibilities of drawing, into experimental technology for this most primordial of mediums, and into the freedom to express who we are—and through this expression, discover who we are."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/12/2020

In celebration of Buckminster Fuller's 125th birthday, a new facsimile of the cult cookbook, 'Synergetic Stew'

Featured spreads are reproduced from Synergetic Stew: Explorations in Dymaxion Dining, Lars Müller's new facsimile edition of the cult cookbook produced by friends and family of Buckminster Fuller on the occasion of his 86th birthday in 1981. Today, we celebrate what would have been Bucky's 125th! "I am excited to have the opportunity to introduce you to this new edition of Synergetic Stew: Explorations in Dymaxion Dining, Fuller's granddaughter Jamie Snyder writes. "The 1981 publication was a surprise gift for my grandfather, Buckminster Fuller, from his Philadelphia office staff on the occasion of his eighty-sixth birthday. It comprises stories and recipes gathered from many of his dear friends and family. As I reviewed a copy of the first edition, I was immediately reminded what a delightful publication it is, and especially how it reflects Bucky’s great sense of humor, largely overlooked in the canon of articles and books about him… As Bucky’s brother-in-law Roger Hewlett reflected elegantly, 'Bucky was always a wellspring of creative things. He would write songs and dialogue, and we would all howl with laughter.… None of this side of Bucky ever gets into the books about him. They make him out to be this great, sober intelligence.… It’s a great pity that the biographies leave out the light, wild things, because they miss a great deal of what Bucky is.'"

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/9/2020

Jeff Divine's 70s Surf Photographs tell it like it was

Featured image, of Buttons Kaluhiokalani in Velzyland, Oahu, HI, 1974, is reproduced from Jeff Divine: 70s Surf Photographs, new from T. Adler Books. "It was a moment when everything in our little world felt up for grabs," Pulitzer Prize–winning author William Finnegan writes. "Surfing had boomed in popularity in the beach-blanket sixties, failed its audition as a mainstream televised sport, and then blown itself up in a late-sixties design revolution that reduced boards, seemingly overnight, from nine feet six inches to six feet six, from twenty-five pounds to less than ten. Suddenly, people were turning twice as hard, going twice as fast, and, most transformingly, pulling into heaving barrels that had been unridable, off-limits, the stuff of idle fantasy until yesterday. These changes have all been lasting. The social upheavals of the period touched surfing, but only glancingly—in music, fashion, a wavelet of Eastern mysticism, more than a wavelet of recreational drugs, and a few muddy shining pockets of back-to-the-landism in places where the land happened to about pumping waves." To order a signed copy, please contact our friends at Arcana: Books on the Arts.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/7/2020

Profound questions about space, time and material in Julia Christensen's 'Upgrade Available'

"What Remains (Estate Sale 1)" (2014) is reproduced Upgrade Available, Julia Christensen's investigation of how "upgrade culture"—the perceived notion that we need to constantly upgrade our electronics to remain relevant—fundamentally impacts our experience of time. "We encode our electronics with our memory, our identity, and our legacy," Christensen writes. "Once it is time to throw them away, we have transformed them into very complicated pieces of trash. And given the short cycles of technology time, our electronic memories, identities, and legacies produce a huge material flow on our planet. Maybe the public has a difficult time separating the objects from our experiences, our relationships, our jobs, so it is difficult to construe them as trash after their cycle of technology time has come to a close.
We will each live through hundreds of cycles of technology time. It is happening right now, across the devices that aid our productivity, simultaneous frames of technology time defining our experience. We strive to mesh technology time with the broader cycles of time we experience. And we encode our electronics with our identity, our memory and our legacy in order to—ironically—attempt to transcend real time altogether."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/5/2020

'John Cage: A Mycological Foray—Variations on Mushrooms' is here at last!

Featured spreads are reproduced from the undisputed bookseller favorite of Spring 2020, John Cage: A Mycological Foray—Variations on Mushrooms, releasing today from Atelier Éditions. "I have come to the conclusion that much can be learned about music by devoting oneself to the mushroom," Cage writes in Music Lovers' Field Companion, reproduced in the book alongside other writings and a wealth of mushroom-themed compositions by Cage, photographs, illustrations, ephemera and a second volume reproducing Cage’s 1972 portfolio, Mushroom Book. "For this purpose, I have recently moved to the country," Cage continues. "Much of my time is spent poring over 'field companions' on fungi. These I obtain at half price in second-hand bookshops, which later are in some rare cases next door to shops selling dog-eared sheets of music, such an occurrence being greeted by me as irrefutable evidence that I am on the right track. The winter for mushrooms, as for music, is a most sorry season. Only in caves and houses where matters of temperature and humidity, and in concert halls where matters of trusteeship and box office are under constant surveillance, do the vulgar and accepted forms thrive. American commercialism has brought about a grand deterioration of the Psalliota campestris, affecting through exports even the European market. As a demanding gourmet sees but does not purchase the marketed mushroom, so a lively musician reads from time to time the announcements of concerts and stays quietly at home…"

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/4/2020

On Independence Day 2020, we remember Robert Frank, "tragic poet" and author of the seminal photography book "The Americans"

“That crazy feeling in America when the sun is hot on the streets and music comes out of the jukebox or from a nearby funeral, that’s what Robert Frank has captured in tremendous photographs taken as he traveled on the road around practically forty-eight states in an old used car (on Guggenheim Fellowship) and with the agility, mystery, genius, sadness and strange secrecy of a shadow photographed scenes that have never been seen before on film. For this he will definitely be hailed as a great artist in his field… Robert Frank, Swiss, unobtrusive, nice, with that little camera that he raises and snaps with one hand he sucked a sad poem right out of America onto film, taking rank among the tragic poets of the world. To Robert Frank I now give this message: You got eyes.” —Jack Kerouac, The Americans.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/3/2020

Relaxed mastery in the "Afternoon Paintings" of Stanley Whitney

"Untitled" (2017) is reproduced from Stanley Whitney: Afternoon Paintings, Lisson Gallery's new collection of the artist's small paintings made late in the day with the paint left over from his larger canvases. Essayist Lynne Tillman writes, "Whitney tells me after working carefully crafting big pieces, he likes to paint smaller ones, because, at the end of the day, 'I’m more relaxed, more loose, more carefree, and I’m kind of tired, too.' Seriously, I had never heard an artist say he works when he’s tired. I ask why, when tired: 'Because after working so hard and being serious, after struggling with is it right or is it wrong, I feel I open up, then I can see what happens, not putting pressure on myself.' Also, he explains, the shifts in size allow him 'to think differently. And to move differently.' I think about how in writing size shapes it too—a long work compared with a short one, duration and concision. These different exigencies do make artists think differently. Scale must always be considered, it makes its own demands."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 7/1/2020

RIP Milton Glaser

Celebrated American graphic designer Milton Glaser produced "Dylan," one of the most iconic posters of the twentieth century, for Capitol Records in 1966. Reproduced from the chapter Overwhelm the Eye, featuring other psychedelic-era designers like Bonnie MacLean, Wes Wilson and Victor Moscoso, it is one of 150 exquisite examples selected by Ellen Lupton for the Cooper-Hewitt's 2015 exhibition on How Posters Work. Lupton writes, "This is not a book about posters. It is a book about how designers see. The works assembled here show how dozens of different designers—from prominent pioneers to little-known makers—have mobilized principles of composition, perception and rhetoric. Each poster enacts ways of thinking and making, and each poster wants to be seen. How do we look at graphic design, and how, in turn, does graphic design look back at us?"

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/30/2020

See Book Reviews, Trailers and Flip-Through Videos on our new YouTube Channel!

Artbook | D.A.P. is proud to announce our new YouTube Channel featuring Book Trailers from our publishers, Book Reviews by our West Coast correspondent Tosh Berman, and Flip-Through Videos from our in-house team that let you experience the material qualities of the books wherever you are. Watch an ever-evolving list of videos on this page via these three master playlists, or choose individual videos from the categories of Gift Picks, Art, Photography, Architecture & Design, Exhibition Catalogs, Music & Film, Fashion and Graphic Design.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/26/2020

Ecstasy and celebration in 'Mechanical Fantasy Box: The Homoerotic Journal of Patrick Cowley'

Featured image is reproduced from Mechanical Fantasy Box, a Staff Pick for Pride Weekend 2020. Collecting electronic dance music legend Patrick Cowley's homoerotic journal entries, 1974–1980 (he died of AIDS-related illness in 1982), this volume can be seen as an historic document, offering an unfiltered glimpse into San Francisco's hardcore gay disco scene in its heyday. Cowley's entry for June 26, 1977 reads:
"A red letter day. The Gay Rights parade, Christopher St. A day of total ecstasy & celebration with complete men & women. The faces that go with the images in these pages passed before me filled with the spirit of our basic need. My family from the Citoi had me Brazilian hips between the bubble machines and Robert & I beaming our beauty and love overflowing into the streets and finally to the source the sun the sun the sun & my arms & hands outstretched in communion & worship. The revelation of a martyr. Search the mere facts of his path to sainthood.
LIVING IN THIS BRAND NEW WORLD
MAY BE A FANTASY
BUT IT’S TAUGHT ME TO LOVE
AND THAT’S REAL
REAL
REAL TO ME."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/25/2020

'Berenice Abbott: Portraits of Modernity' is a Pride Month Pick from Fundacíon Mapfre

"Self Portrait—Distortion" (c. 1930) is reproduced from Fundacíon Mapfre's beautiful new duotone-printed Berenice Abbott monograph, Portraits of Modernity. Collecting Abbott's portraits of the most exciting, provocative and often gender-bending intellectuals of her time, her fearless photographs of all corners of 1930s New York and her documentation of scientific phenomena, including experiments with plants, gears, lenses, pendula, magnets and more, this 264-page clothbound volume is the perfect overview. It's also a glimpse into the pioneering spirit of the early twentieth century avant-garde and its gender-defiant underground.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/19/2020

Pieces of life and shards of history in 'Melvin Edwards: Lynch Fragments'

"Some Bright Morning" (1963) is reproduced from Melvin Edwards: Lynch Fragments, a 50-year retrospective of the artist's riveting, politically-charged steel sculptures. "Edwards’ personal memories and biography, stemming from his growing up in the highly racist and segregated United States, are part and parcel with the collective stories surrounding that cultural environment in the mid-20th century," Rodrigo Moura writes. "Shovels, axes, rakes, and horseshoes evoke the rural context of the U.S. South, where the artist’s ancestors settled and where he spent part of his childhood, at his grandmother’s house in the Fifth Ward of Houston, Texas, a community of African descendants and Latino immigrants. The relationships between body and machine are present through the use of structures resembling gears that also suggest an intricate relationship between the individual and society. The artist is the subject of memories that relate to a broad historical panel of cultural exchanges and power relations involving the peoples of Africa, America and Europe. The notion of fragment is fundamental: the sculptures are pieces of life and shards of history."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 6/19/2020

“That’s what art is; we’re the art!”

Featured image is one of 70 photographs documenting Art Is…, the 1983 performance staged by Lorraine O’Grady (aka Mademoiselle Bourgeoisie Noire) as part of the Harlem African American Day Parade. The piece was inspired by a friend’s comment, “avant-garde art doesn’t have anything to do with Black people.” Mademoiselle’s response, according to Soul of a Nation curator Zoé Whitley, was to hire 15 dancers to carry gold frames, "disembarking from the float to interact with the crowd. The performance lasted for eight hours. As the float traversed the several miles-long parade route, the parade announcer mocked, ‘They tell me this is art… I don’t understand that stuff.’ But some members of the crowd responded enthusiastically, ‘Frame me! Frame me! Make me art!’ And ‘That’s right. That’s what art is; we’re the art!’”

REILLY DAVIDSON | DATE 6/17/2020

Kader Attia represents the unrepresented in 'Landing Strip'

Published to accompany a landmark larger survey at London’s Hayward Gallery, this book of photographs from French-Algerian artist and activist Kader Attia celebrates Paris’ Algerian transgender community of the late 1990s. Throughout 140 intimate and enlightening photographs, Attia’s lens avoids objectification in favor of an honest portrayal of his subjects’ lives. Documenting moments of sadness, passion and chaos as he follows their narratives from home to street to club, he represents the unrepresented with a remarkable sensitivity that is also reflected in the essays. As noted by essayist Tarek El-Ariss, “These photographs go beyond the colonial past and its indelible traces. In these images, tears of abandonment and betrayal mix with tears of joy and too much laughter. Tears shed over Arcadia Voladkar’s ‘last man,’ who drowned off the coast of Beirut, or over the stories about how clumsy and dull the last man was—these draw new paths that the make-up sometimes covers, and sometimes accentuates.”

DATE 11/5/2019

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: Stocking Stuffers

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: Stocking Stuffers

They're cute, they're small, they're surprising and affordable. Here are 15 staff picks for the stockings on your list »

DATE 11/4/2019

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Art Lover

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Art Lover

The must-have art books of 2019 »

DATE 11/7/2019

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Photographer and Photography Collector

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Photographer and Photography Collector

A few of our favorite 2019 monographs and surveys by Modern and contemporary photographers »

DATE 11/10/2019

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Design Devotee

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Design Devotee

Gifts for design devotees: your guide to the top new architecture and design books for the 2019 holidays »

DATE 11/10/2019

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Food Lover

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Food Lover

Whether you love to cook, eat or ponder the politics of food, here are our staff pick food and cooking gift books of 2019 »

DATE 11/17/2019

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For Students of Black History

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For Students of Black History

Our staff favorite 2019 books on black art and history »

DATE 11/9/2019

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Stargazer

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Stargazer

Impress your favorite armchair astronomers with wonderful gift books on the cosmos »

DATE 11/8/2019

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Fashion Forward

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Fashion Forward

Our staff favorite holiday fashion gift books for 2019 »

DATE 11/6/2019

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Bookworm

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Bookworm

Five must-have 2019 reading books for the literature lovers on your list »

DATE 11/14/2019

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Cinephile or Music Lover

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Cinephile or Music Lover

Our staff feels love for these top film and music books of 2019 »

DATE 11/16/2019

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For LGBTQ Readers

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For LGBTQ Readers

Our staff favorite 2019 books on or by LGBTQ artists »

DATE 11/10/2019

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Armchair Traveler

Holiday Gift Guide 2019: For the Armchair Traveler

This is a year of escape fantasy for many Americans, and we've got just the right book for every world traveler on your list »

DATE 4/7/2020

Read an excerpt from new release 'The Outwardness of Art: Selected Writings of Adrian Stokes'

Read an excerpt from new release 'The Outwardness of Art: Selected Writings of Adrian Stokes'

This week, Ridinghouse releases 'The Outwardness of Art: Selected Writings of Adrian Stokes,' the first comprehensive selection of writings by the noted British art theorist known for his synthesis of aesthetics and psychoanalysis. Edited by Thomas Evans, it is the first broad introduction in almost half a century.

DATE 3/7/2019

Remembering Carolee Schneemann

Remembering Carolee Schneemann

We will miss Carolee Schneemann, fearless performance artist, painter, filmmaker, feminist and innate breaker of taboos. She died this week at the age of 79. In memoriam, we present an excerpt from 'Carolee Schneemann: Uncollected Texts,' published by Primary Information.

DATE 5/9/2018

Vivid words from Lars Müller at the Storefront for Art and Architecture Benefit, 2018

Vivid words from Lars Müller at the Storefront for Art and Architecture Benefit, 2018

This week, Lars Müller of Lars Müller Publishers was honored at the 2018 Storefront for Art and Architecture Benefit at the New York Public Library. As the North American distributor of Lars Müller's extraordinary list of books on art, architecture, design and theory, we are ourselves honored to reproduce his acceptance speech here.


ARTBOOK LOGO
 
 

the art world's source for books on art & culture

  

CUSTOMER SERVICE
orders@artbook.com
212 627 1999
M-F 9-5 EST

TRADE ACCOUNTS

800 338 2665

CONTACT

JOBS + INTERNSHIPS

NEW YORK
Showroom by Appointment Only
75 Broad Street, Suite 630
New York NY 10004
Tel   212 627 1999

LOS ANGELES
Showroom by Appointment Only
818 S. Broadway, Suite 700
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Tel. 323 969 8985

ARTBOOK LLC
D.A.P. | Distributed Art Publishers, Inc.


All site content Copyright C 2000-2017 by Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. and the respective publishers, authors, artists. For reproduction permissions, contact the copyright holders.

ARTBOOK AMPERSAT

The D.A.P. Catalog
www.artbook.com