ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 12/10/2022

Artbook | D.A.P. & ICP present Margit Erb & Michael Parillo for the launch of 'The Unseen Saul Leiter'

DATE 11/25/2022

Hot book alert! 'Pattie Boyd: My Life in Pictures' is new from Reel Art Press

DATE 11/23/2022

Happy Thanksgiving from Artbook | D.A.P.!

DATE 11/22/2022

Join Artbook | D.A.P. at Art Basel Miami Beach 2022!

DATE 11/22/2022

A fascinating guide to Frida Kahlo's Mexican folk art inspiration

DATE 11/20/2022

Sam Contis and Geoff Dyer on 'Overpass' at Artbook @ Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore

DATE 11/19/2022

Museum Store of the Month: MOCA Store

DATE 11/19/2022

Museum Store of the Month: MOCA Store

DATE 11/18/2022

An unprecedented visual biography in 'Einstein: The Man and His Mind'

DATE 11/18/2022

Holiday Gift Guide 2022: For the Art Historian

DATE 11/17/2022

SoHarlem presents Deborah Willis launching 'Free as they want to be: Artists Committed to Memory'

DATE 11/17/2022

Deborah Bell Photographs presents the launch of 'Elaine Mayes: The Haight-Ashbury Portraits'

DATE 11/15/2022

This week, it's all about Joan Didion


RECENT POSTS

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 12/10/2022

Artbook | D.A.P. & ICP present Margit Erb & Michael Parillo for the launch of 'The Unseen Saul Leiter'

Saturday, December 10 at 3PM, please join Artbook | D.A.P. and ICP | International Center for Photography for the launch of 'The Unseen Saul Leiter,' published by D.A.P. Authors Margit Erb and Michael Parillo of the Saul Leiter Foundation will present and discuss images from the book, followed by a Q&A and a reception in the bookstore.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/25/2022

Hot book alert! 'Pattie Boyd: My Life in Pictures' is new from Reel Art Press

In case you haven't seen it in major press outlets like The Guardian, i-D or People magazine, we're here to tell you that Pattie Boyd: My Life in Pictures has at last arrived on our shores, courtesy of noted UK art book publisher Reel Art Press of Led Zeppelin by Led Zeppelin and Black Ivy fame. A deluxe visual treasure trove of photographs, letters, diaries and more from one of the most famous muses of the twentieth century—and a gifted photographer in her own right—this is a book that's very hard to put down if you have any interest in pop culture, music or fashion of the 60s and 70s. It's also one of our top Holiday Gift Books of 2022. "I take life as it comes to me," Boyd is quoted. "I digest it and then I do something about it. Or I don't. I'm quite proactive and I like to do things immediately, but I'm learning to hold back and not be so spontaneous. I decided very early on that there never needed to be a dull moment in life. If you find yourself feeling dull, just change your mind."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/23/2022

Happy Thanksgiving from Artbook | D.A.P.!

“My Nurse” (1936/67) is reproduced from our 2022 Thanksgiving staff pick, Meret Oppenheim: My Exhibition, MoMA's definitive study of the German-born Swiss artist, published to accompany the major traveling retrospective on view at the Museum now through March 2023. Monumental not only in terms of her contributions to mid-century art over many movements—from Surrealism to Pop, Nouveau Réalisme and Conceptual art—Oppenheim was also well ahead of her time in regards to concepts around gender. As this superb 184-page catalog makes clear, there has always been much more to her work than a furry teacup. This is a book for every serious art library.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/22/2022

Join Artbook | D.A.P. at Art Basel Miami Beach 2022!

VISIT US DECEMBER 1–3, 2022! Our bookstore is located in the West Lobby of the fair at Booth W109 on the Convention Center Drive side of the Miami Beach Convention Center. Come preview Bokförlaget Stolpe's remarkable, long-awaited seven-volume 'Hilma af Klint: The Complete Catalogue Raisonné,' and join us for the ABMB Conversation featuring Carrie Mae Weems and Nona Hendryx with Hans Ulrich Obrist—whose unforgettable slogan, BOOKS ARE URGENT, is the theme of our 2022 booth, and graces our tote bag.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/22/2022

A fascinating guide to Frida Kahlo's Mexican folk art inspiration

According to Frida Kahlo and Arte Popular author Layla Bermeo, Frida Kahlo was one of many middle-class Mexican mestizo women who "appropriated the traditional clothing, jewelry and braids of Indigenous women as a performance of nationalism, a wearable extension of collecting arte popular." In this photograph taken around 1940 by Bernard Silberstein, Kahlo—a devout collector of Mexican folk and indigenous art, including painted ceramics, embroidered textiles, religious votives, effigies and children's toys—appears in the same bida ní quichi headdress that she wore in her iconic 1943 painting, Self-Portrait as a Tehuana. In the photograph, she stands before her collection of arte popular ceramics. Appropriate for this Holiday Gift Staff Pick, she is surrounded on the top shelf by robed kings bearing gifts, alongside figurines of Adam and Eve.

LACY SOTO | DATE 11/20/2022

Sam Contis and Geoff Dyer on 'Overpass' at Artbook @ Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore

Sunday, November 20, at 2 PM PST, Artbook @ Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore and Aperture present a conversation between artist Sam Contis and writer Geoff Dyer, discussing Contis’s most recent title, 'Overpass.'

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/19/2022

Museum Store of the Month: MOCA Store

Attention museum and museum store lovers of the west coast! The MOCA Store (at the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles) is our official Museum Store of the Month. And let us tell you, this store has got it ALL!⁠

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/19/2022

Museum Store of the Month: MOCA Store

Attention museum and museum store lovers of the west coast! The MOCA Store (at the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles) is our official Museum Store of the Month. And let us tell you, this store has got it ALL!⁠

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/18/2022

An unprecedented visual biography in 'Einstein: The Man and His Mind'

"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world." So said Albert Einstein in 1929. Both this quotation and this rare 1947 print signed by photographer Philippe Halsman are reproduced from Einstein: The Man and His Mind—Damiani's stunning new visual biography, featuring a wealth of signed photographs, letters, manuscripts and more from the collection of Gary S. Berger. According to the editors, Halsman's iconic photograph has become one of the most recognizable images of the twentieth century. "It appeared on a 1966 US postage stamp and was featured on the cover of the December 31, 1999, edition of Time magazine, which honored Einstein as the 'Person of the Century.' … In his book Philippe Halsman: A Retrospective, Halsman explained the circumstances of the photo: 'I admired Albert Einstein more than anyone I ever photographed, not only as the genius who single-handedly had changed the foundation of modern physics but even more as a rare and idealistic human being. Personally, I owed him an immense debt of gratitude. After the fall of France, it was through his personal intervention that my name was added to the list of artists and scientists who, in danger of being captured by the Nazis, were given emergency visas to the United States.'"

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/17/2022

Deborah Bell Photographs presents the launch of 'Elaine Mayes: The Haight-Ashbury Portraits'

Thursday, November 17, from 6–8 PM, Deborah Bell Photographs, Fotofocus and Damiani Books invite you to join photographer Elaine Mayes for the launch and signing her new monograph, 'The Haight-Ashbury Portraits 1967–1968.'

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/17/2022

SoHarlem presents Deborah Willis launching 'Free as they want to be: Artists Committed to Memory'

Thursday, November 17, from 5:30–6:30 PM, SoHarlem presents artist, educator, scholar and prolific writer Deborah Willis, sharing her recent publication, 'Free as they want to be: Artists Committed to Memory,' published by Damiani Books.

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/15/2022

This week, it's all about Joan Didion

"The upside of knowing how to make dreams come true is understanding the fakery involved," Hilton Als writes in Joan Didion: What She Means, DelMonico Books' hot new clothbound hardcover published to accompany the Als-curated group exhibition on view now at the Hammer Museum. "From the first, Didion saw not only the false or borrowed diamonds on the star’s lapel but also the paste holding them together. You have to know how to look in order to have vision—to see the thing for what it is, and what it means to the self—and not turn your back on that reality or on reality in general. Again, the radicalism of Didion’s vision has to do with not only not looking away but also describing what others cannot see or won’t, generally in a bid to protect the rights and privileges of their class and maintaining that class’s various fictions."

ABOVE: Brigitte Lacombe, Joan Didion, New York, 1996, 1996. Black-and-white photograph. 16 × 20 in. Courtesy of the artist and Lacombe, Inc.


CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/13/2022

Moody melodrama in 'Film Noir Portraits'

Featured image—of Joan Crawford in her iconic 1945 come-back performance of ruthlessly ambitious yet heartlessly scorned single mother Mildred Pierce—is reproduced from Film Noir Portraits, Reel Art Press's authoritative new compendium of classic and previously unpublished film-noir studio photography. "These are the faces of men and women who had survived World War Two but had been permanently damaged or broken by the experience," Paul Duncan writes. "These are the faces of the desperate and the afraid, the smitten and the disgusted, the hardboiled and the furious, often writhing in pain after taking a punch or a bullet. These are the faces of noir."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/11/2022

'Jimmy DeSana: Submission' opens at Brooklyn Museum

"Marker Cones" (1982) is reproduced from Jimmy DeSana: Submission, published to accompany the highly anticipated exhibition opening this week at the Brooklyn Museum. The first comprehensive book on the compelling yet always unsettling photographer, who was not well known outside of the NYC underground in his short lifetime, this book makes the case for genius. "Jimmy DeSana was a compact bundle of contradictions," Laurie Simmons writes, "a man of few words, rather bashful socially (but it was often impossible to get off the phone with him). He was out all night but completely punctual and reliable by day, a semi-detached student and keen observer of the human condition. … I am immensely grateful for every moment Jimmy and I spent together, for every freezing second I floated naked in a pool or held an awkward pose for way too long, for this was my graduate program in photography—this is really where I learned to make a picture … standing within Jimmy’s quiet but determined force field, emulating his laserlike focus and his ultimate belief that making art was a space to play and dream."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/8/2022

Comprehensive, gorgeous 'Carrie Mae Weems: A Great Turn in the Possible' releases this week!

Featured spreads are from Carrie Mae Weems: A Great Turn in the Possible, the beautifully produced catalog to the artist's current mid-career retrospective at Fundación MAPFRE in Barcelona. Presenting works from all of Weems' important series—from her early Family Pictures and Stories (1978–84) to her seminal Kitchen Table Series (1990) to her very recent Seat or Stand and Speak (2021)—this is the most comprehensive survey of Weems’ genre-defying oeuvre yet published. "Weems can be considered a public intellectual for her decision to operate within and outside of a disciplinary framework," Elvira Dyangani Ose writes, "addressing the world from the affirmation of the African American experience in a praxis organized around the production of a knowledge directed at transforming the social contexts in which we live and operate, and outside of academia. This modus operandi is central to Weems’s oeuvre, which has always been prompted by her drive to rescue untold stories and their protagonists from oblivion into the public sphere, and to subvert the powers that marginalized or silenced those stories and their agents in the first place. Like [Toni] Morrison, Weems encourages herself and others to take ownership of their narratives and, especially on behalf of and for subjects like herself—women, working-class and Black—to articulate and reimagine the accounts of lives that have never been sufficiently valued or narrated with the esteem and rigor that the artist would have wanted; or not sufficiently, anyway, to offer the guarantee of once and for all destroying the racial prejudices so heavily rooted in the United States’ sociopolitical psyche and popular imaginary."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/6/2022

Comprehensive, long-overdue retrospective of Henry Taylor opens at MOCA LA

Untitled (2022) is reproduced from new release Henry Taylor: B Side, published to accompany the largest exhibition of the Los Angeles artist's work to date, and his first hometown retrospective ever. "Henry Taylor and his work are many things to many audiences," curator Bennett Simpson writes: "prolific, spontaneous, extroverted, big-hearted, heroic, occasionally melancholy, raw and fast, observant and witty. He is an artist of adjectives, slants of meaning that cannot help but append to his abiding subject, which is people. Taylor is a painter of people almost exclusively, and as such, he is a storyteller—indeed, he is one of the preeminent storytellers in contemporary art. … In works that deal in scenes from current events or that construct biting allegories of racial injustice, he extends a long tradition of modern history painting to new subjects and audiences. His representation of the diversity of Black experience, as he has lived and absorbed it over several decades of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, is both affirming and dizzying, and it has been highly influential on younger generations."

Henry Taylor, Untitled, 2022, acrylic on canvas, 72 x 60 x 30 in. Image and work © Henry Taylor, courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Jeff McLane.


CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/3/2022

A remarkable new monograph on Sally Gabori

Evocative and immediate, "Thundi" (2010) is reproduced from Fondation Cartier's exquisite new monograph on Sally Gabori (aka Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda), the late Indigenous Australian artist who began painting in her eighties—after decades of forced exile from her ancestral home—and left an archive of approximately 3000 paintings by the time of her death in 2015. Filled with vivid details and numerous gatefold reproductions in the plate section, this 268-page visual treasure-trove and teller of problematic histories also includes several smaller bound-in booklets-within-the-book, printed on special papers and focused on themes like archival photographs or Gabori's original Kaiadilt landscape. "This is my land," Gabori is quoted, "this is my sea, this is who I am."

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/1/2022

Hot Book Alert: 'Betye Saar: Black Doll Blues' is NEW from Roberts Projects!

Featured spreads are from Roberts Projects' highly anticipated Betye Saar: Black Doll Blues, presenting the inimitable nonagenarian's collection of Black dolls, alongside recent watercolors of the dolls, historic assemblages, sketchbooks and a pop-out cardboard doll modeled after Saar’s "Hoo Doo Woman" (1974)—the only doll in Saar's collection that she hand-made herself. "During the 2020 pandemic quarantine, I began creating watercolor paintings of the Black dolls from my collection," Saar is quoted. "I’ve always used watercolors for my sketchbooks, especially when I travel. I love the freedom of watercolor as a medium, and the rich, saturated, bright colors lend themselves well to depicting the clothing of the dolls. As I painted my dolls, I drew comfort from touching them, arranging them, tidying their skirts and jackets. It was fun. And perhaps on some level, it was a way to keep me feeling safe during the lockdown. Essentially, I was playing with my dolls."