SUSTAINABILITY | GREEN DESIGN

PUBLISHER
METROPOLIS BOOKS

BOOK FORMAT
Paperback, 8 x 8 in. / 304 pgs / 300 color.

PUBLISHING STATUS
PUB DATE
Active

DISTRIBUTION
D.A.P. EXCLUSIVE
CATALOG: SPRING 2011 p. 175   

PRODUCT DETAILS
ISBN 9781935202479 TRADE
LIST PRICE: $35.00 CDN $40.00

AVAILABILITY
Awaiting stock

"Urgent questions about the role and responsibility of architects have been circulating since the Indian Ocean tsunami killed more than 200,000 people in 2004. At that time the relief effort exposed troubling gaps between humanitarian aid that targets the short term and our ability to rebuild homes, infrastructure, and communities well. While aid agencies are willing, they do not have an architectfs knowledge or insights; consequently, the buildings that replace destroyed communities are frequently unsafe.

Unfortunately, this is as true today as it was seven years ago. However corrupt or appalling the politics (and policies) behind the catastrophes in Sichuan and Haiti, professional architects—whether in the developing or developed world— are notably absent from efforts to protect people from disaster. Yet architects have recently been very active in other areas of public interest—for example, they have instigated a range of creative strategies to improve social, environmental, and economic equity, some of which have become books about how to alter the way we think about the design process. But in extreme circumstances, in crises, architects offer no coherent response. They play no sustained role in shaping policy and have had little active presence or voice in leading best practices in disaster prevention, mitigation, and recovery. There is still no career path that prepares students to work as urgentistes—design professionals who intervene at a crucial moment in the recovery process to produce enduring solutions.

Which is precisely why this book is about the architects who are helping save lives. Innovative, fascinating work is being done by small teams of outstanding professionals in Asia, Latin America, Africa, and the United States, who are proving to be critical, relevant partners helping communities recover from disaster and rebuild. The highly skilled architects and leaders in other fields who have so generously contributed to this book are providing resilient solutions that ensure the safety of new homes and bring coherence to land-use planning. These teams assess damage but also research innovative building technologies. They are at the forefront of the use of low-cost, energy-saving, environmentally sound materials and new methods of prefabrication. They have discovered ways to bring affordable high-tech solutions to vulnerable communities. These teams are experts in how best to bridge the gap that separates shortterm emergency needs from long-term sustainable recovery. And they are experienced in helping reduce future risk, promote awareness, and protect relief investment. Admittedly, this level of expertise is rare, concentrated in the hands of far too few professionals working worldwide.

Beyond Shelter is a call to action. When I started writing this book and searched for practicing architects skilled at working with risk almost everyone asked me the same question: why architects? As if to say, what is it to us? At the conference Risques Majeurs 2008 (Major Risks 2008) sponsored by the European Union, two or three architects were present. The officials and ministers I spoke with reminded me that on average architects contribute to only 3 percent of the worldfs built environment. Their indifference—or worse, irrelevance—to the worldfs most vulnerable communities made them seem hardly worth talking about. Three percent is a terrible number.

But if not architects and planners, who is in charge of rebuilding towns and villages leveled by earthquakes and cyclones? The answer is disquieting: no one is in charge. Typically, a patchwork of nongovernmental charities, government agencies, and residents themselves cobble together solutions. In large-scale disasters, even when aid pours in, the expertise and planning infrastructure needed to make best use of the money are lacking."

- Excerpted from the Preface by Marie J. Aquilino

"A safe, durable, and dignified home is an aspiration of all, yet often hindered by a lack of access to the required know-how. This valuable work champions the need to involve the built-environment professionals and practitioners who have such expertise on the frontlines of post-disaster and sustainable shelter and settlement." —Graham Saunders, head, Shelter and Settlements Department, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

Please visit the BBC site to hear Aquilino speak on the importance of giving victims of natural disasters long-life homes and infrastructure.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PREFACE
Beyond Shelter: Architecture and Human Dignity by Marie J. Aquilino

INTRODUCTION
The Architecture of Risk by Victoria L. Harris

ARCHITECTURE AFTER DISASTER
Learning from Aceh by Andrea Fitrianto
Beyond Shelter in the Solomon Islands by Andrea Nield
News from the Teardrop Island by Sandra D’Urzo
From Transitional to Permanent Shelter: Invaluable Partnerships in Peru by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

WHAT SHOULD GOVERNMENTS DO?
When People Are Involved by Thiruppugazh Venkatachalam
Citizen Architects in India by Rupal and Rajendra Desai
What about Our Cities? Rebuilding Muzaffarabad by Maggie Stephenson, Sheikh Ahsan Ahmed, and Zahid Amin

URBAN RISK AND RECOVERY
Below the Sill Plate: New Orleans East Struggles to Recover by Deborah Gans with James Dart
Slumlifting: An Informal Toolbox for a New Architecture by Alfredo Brillembourg and Hubert Klumpner
Sustainable Communities: Avoiding Disaster in the Informal City by Arlene Lusterio
Camouflaging Disaster: 60 Linear Miles of Local Transborder Urban Conflict by Teddy Cruz
Cultural Heritage and Disaster Mitigation: A New Alliance by Rohit Jigyasu

ENVIRONMENTAL RESILIENCE
Green Recovery by Anita van Breda and Brittany Smith
The Home as the World: Tamil Nadu by Jennifer E. Duyne Barenstein
Design as Mitigation in the Himalayas by Francesca Galeazzi
On Beauty, Architecture, and Crisis: The Salam Centre for Cardiac Surgery in Sudan by Raul Pantaleo

TEACHING AS STRATEGIC ACTION
Cultivating Resilience: The BaSiC Initiative by Sergio Palleroni
Studio 804 in Greensburg, Kansas by Dan Rockhill and Jenny Kivett
Sustainable Knowledge and Internet Technology by Mehran Gharaati, Kimon Onuma, and Guy Fimmers

IS PREVENTION POSIBLE?
More to Lose: The Paradox of Vulnerability by John Norton and Guillaume Chantry
Building Peace across African Frontiers by Robin Cross and Naomi Handa Williams
Haiti 2010: Reports from the Field by Marie J. Aquilino

AFTERWORD
Open Letter to Architects, Engineers, and Urbanists by Patrick Coulombel


  

METROPOLIS BOOKS

Beyond Shelter

Architecture and Human Dignity

Published by Metropolis Books
Edited by Marie J. Aquilino. Text by Sheikh Ahsan Ahmed, Zahid Amin, Marie J. Aquilino, Jennifer E. Duyne Barestein, Alfredo Brillembourg, Guillaume Chantry, Patrick Coulombel, Robin Cross, Teddy Cruz, James Dart, Rajedra and Rupal Desai, Sandra D'Urzo, Guy Fimmers, Andrea Fitrianto, Francesca Galeazzi, Deborah Gans, Mehran Gharaati, Victoria L. Harris, Rohit Jigyasu, Jenny Kivett, Hubert Klumpner, Arlene Lusterio, Andrea Nield, John Norton, Kimon Onuma, Sergio Palleroni, Raul Pantaleo, Dan Rockhill, Brittany Smith, Maggie Stephenson, Anita Van Breda, Thiruppugazh Venkatachalam, Naomi Handa Williams.

Featured photograph, by Agostino Pacciani, is reproduced from <a href="9781935202479.html">Beyond Shelter:
Architecture and Human Dignity</a>. Across Africa, Asia, Latin America and the United States, groundbreaking work is being done by small teams of outstanding professionals who are helping communities to recover from disaster and rebuild, bridging the gap that separates short-term emergency needs from long-term sustainable recovery. Questions about the role and responsibility of architects in disaster recovery have been circulating since the Indian Ocean tsunami killed more than 200,000 people in 2004. In the last decade, 200 million people have been affected by natural disasters and hazards. Ninety-eight percent of these victims are in the developing world, where billions of dollars in aid are absorbed annually by climatic and geologic crises. Those in the developed world are not immune, as extreme temperatures, intense heat waves, increased flooding and droughts expose vast numbers of people to the experience of the eco-refugee. Beyond Shelter is a call to action. It features 20 generously illustrated reports from the field, written by the founders of some of the world's most provocative architecture and engineering firms and studios (Arup, Estudio Teddy Cruz, Urban Think Tank); accomplished nonprofits and research centers (Architectes de l'Urgence, Article 25 Development and Disaster Relief, the Institute for Sustainable Solutions at Portland State University, Development Workshop France); and leaders of such prominent organizations as the Red Cross, UN-Habitat and the World Wildlife Fund. All of these people are on the frontlines of disaster prevention and recovery, in rural and urban areas alike. Beyond Shelter presents projects in such diverse locales as Manila, New Orleans, Gujarat, Sćo Paulo, rural Vietnam, Kashmir, the Gola Forest in Sierra Leone, Greensburg, Kansas and the village of Soba, outside Khartoum. Together they illustrate the reality that evolving risk requires new ways of thinking, and that architects have a leading role to play.

Featured photograph, by Agostino Pacciani, is reproduced from Beyond Shelter: Architecture and Human Dignity.

Beyond Shelter

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The Smithsonian Haiti Cultural Recovery Project and the Future of Heritage Disaster Response This week on the Metropolis Books site, Corine Wegener, Cultural Heritage Preservation Officer for the Smithsonian Institution, reports on the Haiti Cultural Recovery Project, ensuring that "those in need will have a heritage to return to, for themselves and for their children."

Photos below are by Corine Wegener. To read the complete post, continue to the Metropolis Books site.
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"Two days after we arrived the American team pulled in and unloaded dozens of duffle bags full of supplies and power tools from two white Avis 4x4s. Our team had become accustomed to the quiet.

We were working with relatively inexpensive ephemeral materials and improbable shapes in a studious process that required some pounding and sawing but was mainly a series of gestures and short instructions measured by lots of focused alone time sewing, tying, knotting, steadying. Cord was our only high-tech tool.

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