PUBLISHER
VERLAG KETTLER/D.A.P.

BOOK FORMAT
Hardcover, 12.5 x 9.5 in. / 128 pgs / 96 color.

PUBLISHING STATUS
PUB DATE
Active

DISTRIBUTION
D.A.P. EXCLUSIVE
CATALOG: FALL 2014 p. 53   

PRODUCT DETAILS
ISBN 9781938922626 TRADE
LIST PRICE: $65.00 CDN $75.00

AVAILABILITY
In stock

  

VERLAG KETTLER/D.A.P.

Doug Rickard: N.A.

Published by Verlag Kettler/D.A.P.
Text by Z. Redman. Poem by Ann Garlid.

Featured image is reproduced from <I>Doug Rickard: N.A. Catalog</I>.For the last three years, photographer Doug Rickard has been immersed in YouTube videos uploaded by Americans from their cellphones. These videos, documenting a dizzying array of activities, from seemingly criminal or semilegal acts to comic antics, allowed Rickard to witness scenarios he otherwise would never have seen-"right from the hands and eyes of other people," he writes, "hijacking their own device to give me very special views and intimate situations." Reveling in this vicariousness, he found that he could be "riding in a car full of teens through Detroit at night with a camera phone hanging out the window … or witnessing, from their own lens, someone who is paying a drug addict to dance for a dollar to later get 'View,' 'Comments' and 'Likes' on YouTube." Rickard then selected and appropriated specific images by pausing the footage and advancing through it second by second. The resulting volume expands on his previous and critically lauded monograph A New American Picture, offering a darker and more dynamic portrait of America's urban underbelly, and engaging with themes of race, politics, technology, surveillance and our cultural shift toward an ever-present camera. Rickard explains the title: "[It] has always been 'N.A.,' coming for 'National Anthem' … it also could be interpreted to mean 'Not Applicable,' a common statistical check box on government forms here in the US, [or] 'North America.'" Visceral and intense, this volume offers an extraordinary inventory of America today.
Doug Rickard (born 1968) studied history and sociology at the University of California, San Diego. He is the founder of American Suburb X (www.americansuburbx.com) and These Americans (www.theseamericans.com), aggregating websites for essays on contemporary photography and historical photographic archives. His previous monograph, A New American Picture (2010, 2012), which offered a view of America through Google Street View, was widely acclaimed, and (in its first edition by White-Press, Helge Schlaghecke, 2010) was voted "best book" of 2010 by Photo-Eye magazine and is reproduced on the last spread of Phaidon's The Photobook Vol. III by Martin Parr and Gerry Badger.

Featured image is reproduced from Doug Rickard: N.A. Catalog.

PRAISE AND REVIEWS

TIME Lightbox

Phil Bicker

A crash course in found photography in the mobile age, artist Doug Rickard takes still frames from YouTube videos depicting semi-illegal and at times unsettling acts and repurposes them as still images, posing harsh and undeniable questions about private vs. public, photography vs. video and art vs. appropriation.

L'oeil de la Photographie

The Editors

The resulting volume expands on his previous and critically lauded monograph, A New American Picture, offering a darker and more dynamic portrait of America's urban underbelly, and engaging with themes of race, politics, technology, surveillance and our speedy cultural shift toward an ever-present camera in the hand of everyone. Rickard explains the title: "[It] has always been 'N.A.,' an acronym of 'National Anthem' ... it also could be interpreted to mean 'Not Applicable,' a common statistical check box on government forms here in the US, [or] 'North America.'" Visceral and intense, this volume offers an extraordinary inventory of America today.

wmagazine.com

Fan Zhong

Like much of modern history, the Eric Garner decision will eventually be boiled down to a few memorable images—or in this case, unforgettable video footage taken by a bystander. The photographer Doug Rickard’s timely new book, N.A. (D.A.P.), is a catalogue of striking stills he took from hours of YouTube videos uploaded by amateurs in America’s urban underbellies. Some of the images seem criminal, some titillating, some ridiculous, some unbearably intimate. Seen together, they are vivid evidence of the nonstop surveillance culture in which we live. You might think that the police would’ve picked up on that by now.

American Suburb X

Owen Campbell

Abandoned is the word typically deployed to describe these parts of America, yet the first premise of National Anthem is that the places shown are not, in fact, abandoned; they’re merely populated by people without agency, castaways from the middle and upper-class projects of narrative self-representation. The self-representations of the disenfranchised are scattered across mediums with low-publicity and low-barriers to entry, like YouTube, where they exist with a minimum of cross-reference and dialogue, connected by the whims of the algorithms that create the links between them. Rickard takes stills from YouTube, freezes them and rephotographs them. The result is remarkable, atmospheric street photography for the era where everything has already been photographed and selection rivals original documentation.

Artinfo

Scott Indrisek

Access to the Internet is relentlessly marching across the global population, and (almost) everyone will have a computer in their hand at all times, at some point. The result is a massive volume of content that is then exponentially and endlessly growing. Richard Prince had his magazines and tear sheets to work from — artists now have a billion images, in addition to those magazines. Everything on the net is simply “material.” If you look at Tumblr, Instagram, and most of the social media apps, appropriation is becoming a de facto mode of expression, as people remix visual images over and over. Art is reflecting this, and it should. The challenge for artists is then to find a voice within an ocean of endless appropriation possibilities.

The Design Observer Group

John Foster

Not everyone can agree whether shooting images from Google Earth, and now, appropriating images from other people’s YouTube videos, constitutes art. At least one said his Google Earth images were not documentary photography, that it was no more than “an idea.” Call it what you will, Rickard’s work is unique.

Doug Rickard: N.A.

in stock  $65.00


free FedEx Ground shipping

FEDEX GROUND IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S.
FOR CONSUMER ONLINE ORDERS



print icon


arrow back


arrow forward


FROM THE ARTBOOK BLOG

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 11/19/2014

Doug Rickard: N.A.

Doug Rickard: N.A.Featured image is reproduced from N.A., photographer Doug Rickard's exceedingly dark—and all too representative—collection of stills from American YouTube smartphone videos. Time magazine's Krystal Grow writes, "Visual imagery uploaded online is transient at best, but for Rickard, they illustrate larger, darker issues of racism, class inequality and hypocrisy. As images continue to fall haphazardly into the ethers of the internet, Rickard is sifting through them, pulling from our collective virtual consciousness the angst, irony and at times outright aggressiveness we exhibit on quasi-public online forums, but prefer to ignore in the real world." continue to blog


DOUG RICKARD MONOGRAPHS + ARTIST'S BOOKS

Doug Rickard: N.A.

DOUG RICKARD: N.A.

Text by Z. Redman. Poem by Ann Garlid.

VERLAG KETTLER/D.A.P.

ISBN: 9781938922626 | US $65.00

Pub Date: 12/31/2014
Active | In stock


Doug Rickard: A New American Picture

DOUG RICKARD: A NEW AMERICAN PICTURE

Text by David Campany. Interview by Erin O'Toole.

APERTURE

ISBN: 9781597112192 | US $60.00

Pub Date: 9/30/2012
Active | Awaiting stock


ARTBOOK LOGO
 
 

the art world's source for books on art & culture

  

CUSTOMER SERVICE
orders@artbook.com
212 627 1999
M-F 9-5 EST

TRADE ACCOUNTS

800 338 2665

CONTACT

JOBS + INTERNSHIPS

NEW YORK
Showroom by Appointment Only
155 Sixth Avenue
New York NY 10013
Tel   212 627 1999

LOS ANGELES
Showroom by Appointment Only
818 S. Broadway, Suite 700
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Tel. 323 969 8985

ARTBOOK LLC
D.A.P. | Distributed Art Publishers, Inc.


All site content Copyright C 2000-2013 by Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. and the respective publishers, authors, artists. For reproduction permissions, contact the copyright holders.

ARTBOOK AMPERSAT

The D.A.P. Catalog
www.artbook.com