ARTBOOK LOGO

ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 7/26/2021

Dazzling and appropriately overwhelming, 'The Extreme Self' is new from 'The Age of Earthquakes' authors Shumon Basar, Douglas Coupland and Hans Ulrich Obrist

DATE 7/25/2021

Summertime smiles in ‘For Cats Only’

DATE 7/23/2021

'Separate Cinema' is Back in Stock!

DATE 7/22/2021

Thinking of Alexander Calder, born OTD 1898

DATE 7/21/2021

MoMA's 'Automania' traces the rich cultural history of the car

DATE 7/19/2021

Erik Kessels and Thomas Sauvin’s ‘Talk Soon’ reviewed in the ‘Brooklyn Rail’

DATE 7/17/2021

In 'Sophie Taeuber-Arp: Living Abstraction,' every work is an experiment

DATE 7/15/2021

A new and updated edition of 'Christo and Jeanne-Claude: Prints and Objects' Catalogue Raisonné

DATE 7/15/2021

Artbook at Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles presents the launch of 'Final Transmission: Performance Art and AIDS in Los Angeles'

DATE 7/13/2021

A galvanizing new survey of artist-activist Andrea Bowers

DATE 7/13/2021

Join Artbook | D.A.P. at the Atlanta Summer Gift & Home Market, 2021!

DATE 7/11/2021

'Art on the Frontline: Mandate for a People´s Culture' unites writing by Angela Davis with artwork by Tschabalala Self

DATE 7/10/2021

Artbook at Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles & Aperture present 'Tim Davis: I’m Looking Through You'

DATE 7/9/2021

Case Studies in Minimal Art. The Guggenheim's 'Object Lessons' is a New Release this week!

DATE 7/6/2021

Exhilarating 'Eileen Agar: Angel of Anarchy' is a New Release this week!

DATE 7/4/2021

Independent vision in ‘The New Woman Behind the Camera’

DATE 7/2/2021

‘The New Woman Behind the Camera’ opens at The Met

DATE 6/30/2021

Rizzoli presents the virtual book launch of 'Joel Meyerowitz: Wild Flowers'

DATE 6/30/2021

An argument for better captaining of spaceship Earth in 'Alexis Rockman: Shipwrecks'

DATE 6/28/2021

At last, summer camp is back on track! Celebrate with Andy Sweet's high-70s camp photos in 'Hello Muddah, Hello Faddah'

DATE 6/27/2021

Celebrating Gay Pride with 'Mechanical Fantasy Box: The Homoerotic Journal of Patrick Cowley'

DATE 6/26/2021

CELEBRATE LGBTQ PRIDE!

DATE 6/23/2021

Magnificent 'Georgia O’Keeffe' is a new release this week!

DATE 6/21/2021

Weird mojo in 'Another World: The Transcendental Painting Group'

DATE 6/20/2021

For the cool collector Dad: 'Marred for Life! Defaced Record Covers from the Collection of Greg Wooten'

DATE 6/18/2021

On Juneteenth, we celebrate the everyday heroes of Mario Moore’s portraiture

DATE 6/18/2021

Travel Guides!

DATE 6/18/2021

Bureau of General Services—Queer Division presents 'LIFELINES: Art, Intimacy and HIV—an Intergenerational Conversation'

DATE 6/17/2021

Definitive 'Sophie Taeuber-Arp: Living Abstraction' is New from MoMA

DATE 6/15/2021

'Young, Gifted and Black: A New Generation of Artists' is Back in Stock!

DATE 6/13/2021

The little-known photographs of Barkley L. Hendricks

DATE 6/12/2021

Gay Pride Gold in 'Tom of Finland: Made in Germany'

DATE 6/12/2021

Join Kristin Bedford and the Los Angeles Lowrider Community for the release of 'Cruise Night'

DATE 6/10/2021

Monochrome chic in 'Alex Katz: Beauty'

DATE 6/8/2021

'David Hockney: Drawing from Life' is a Staff Pick for Pride Month 2021

DATE 6/6/2021

From hair lacquer to whiskey and sweat in 2021 Pride Month Staff Pick, Karlheinz Weinberger, 'Together & Alone'

DATE 6/3/2021

Electrifying 'Barbara Kruger: Thinking of You. I Mean Me. I Mean You' is a New Release this week!

DATE 6/1/2021

A book like no other. We are thrilled to announce 'An Illustrated Catalog of American Fruits & Nuts'

DATE 6/1/2021

Celebrate LGBTQ+ Pride, 2021!

DATE 5/26/2021

A glimmer of hope in new release, 'Rashid Johnson: The Hikers'

DATE 5/24/2021

On the anniversary of George Floyd’s death, a compendium of writings by and about Black American artists, 1960–1980

DATE 5/20/2021

Alice Mackler does what she wants to do

DATE 5/20/2021

In 'Fabric of a Nation,' quilts "unlike any other in the world"

DATE 5/18/2021

Highly Anticipated ‘Soul of a Nation Reader’ is a New Release this week!

DATE 5/16/2021

Super-hot Kara Walker works on paper survey 'A Black Hole Is Everything a Star Longs to Be' is Back in Stock!

DATE 5/14/2021

A timely meditation on voting rights in Jeanine Michna-Bales' 'Standing Together'

DATE 5/13/2021

Alice Mackler Book Launch and Signing at Kerry Schuss Gallery

DATE 5/12/2021

Essential reading: Arthur Jafa’s ‘MAGNUMB’ is a new release this week

DATE 5/10/2021

'Shepard Fairey: 3 Decades of Dissent' is a New Release this week!

DATE 5/9/2021

Definitely our pick for Mothers Day 2021

DATE 5/8/2021

Groundbreaking Brazilian amateur Modernist photography show ‘Fotoclubismo’ opens at MoMA


BOOKS IN THE MEDIA

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/9/2017

Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights

This weekend, the world lost jazz and civil rights champion Nat Hentoff, one of the greatest and most passionate music journalists of all time. In memoriam, we are honored to present Hentoff's eloquently direct text, Jazz Festivals and the Changing of America, from Jim Marshall: Jazz Festival by Reel Art Press.

Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights
ABOVE: Nat Hentoff, at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1961.

JAZZ FESTIVALS AND THE CHANGING OF AMERICA
by Nat Hentoff


This extraordinary book documents, through the brilliant photography of Jim Marshall, one of the most important periods in the cultural history of the United States.

Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, the Newport and Monterey jazz festivals and the battle for civil rights in the South offered starkly contrasting images of America.

Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights
ABOVE: Jon Hendricks, Don Chastain and Carol Sloane at Monterey, 1964.

After World War II, US soldiers who fought fascism abroad returned to an apartheid nation at home. Blacks and whites could be found in the same towns and cities throughout America but they existed in different worlds.

This was true for most of America but especially in the Southern states where segregation of the races was brutally enforced by Jim Crow laws that dictated how and where blacks could live, work, eat, travel, go to the bathroom or even take a drink of water. Imprisonment, beatings and lynchings were the penalties for blacks who disobeyed Jim Crow.

In the North, where segregation laws never took root, social norms made it difficult for blacks and whites to socialize together in public. One notable exception was the bars and music venues where they gathered to listen to jazz, the first uniquely American art form.

Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights
ABOVE: The crowd at Monterey, 1962

Yet jazz clubs that allowed too much race mixing, as it was called at the time, could still expect to be leaned on by local police. In the early 1940s, before I could vote, I often lied my way into Boston's Savoy Café, where I first came to know jazz musicians. It was the only place in town where blacks and whites were regularly on the stand and in the audience. This led police occasionally to go into the men's room, confiscate the soap, and hand the manager a ticket for unsanitary conditions. There was no law in Boston against mixing the races, but it was frowned on in official circles. I used to hear similar complaints from jazz club owners in New York City during the 1950s.

All of this began to change during the summer of 1954. On May 17, the US Supreme Court issued its landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education, ruling that segregation was a violation of the US Constitution. On July 11, the first White Citizens' Council was formed in Indianola, Mississippi dedicated to preventing the integration of the South. And on July 17 and 18, the first jazz festival was held in Newport, Rhode Island.

The Citizens' Councils soon spread throughout the South, unleashing a wave of terror directed at non-violent civil rights protestors. While Jim Marshall photographed integrated crowds peacefully digging each other's company at jazz festivals, news photographs of police dogs attacking black men, women and children captured a very different reality in the South.

Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights
ABOVE: Monterey, 1961.

The roots of jazz, as well as the roots of the civil rights movement, can be found in the field hollers of slaves reaching out to each other across plantations; gospel songs and prayers connecting slavery here with stories of deliverance of Jews from slavery in the Old Testament; and the blues, the common language of jazz, echoing in Armstrong singing "What did I do to be so black and blue?"

In The Triumph of Music (Harvard University Press) Tim Blanning of Cambridge University tells how black musicians helped prepare America for the civil rights movement. As when opera singer Marian Anderson, denied permission to sing at Constitution Hall by the Daughters of the American Revolution in 1939, was invited to instead sing at the Lincoln memorial by Eleanor Roosevelt. She returned to the Lincoln memorial in 1963, during the March on Washington, to sing the spiritual, "He's Got the Whole World In His Hands."

Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights
ABOVE: Hentoff at Monterey, 1961.

I was there, at the back of the stage, covering this typhoon of protest for Westinghouse radio, as Mahalia Jackson performed, "I've Been Buked and I've Been Scorned," before she sang out: "Tell them about your dream, Martin!"

Outside of the Newport and Monterey jazz festivals, I had never before seen such a large, integrated crowd coming together for a common purpose. As jazz reached deeply into more white Americans, America began to change.


All photographs reproduced from JIM MARSHALL: JAZZ FESTIVAL by REEL ART PRESS.
Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights
Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights
Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights

Jim Marshall: Jazz Festival

Jim Marshall: Jazz Festival

REEL ART PRESS
Hbk, 9.5 x 11.5 in. / 336 pgs / 600 b&w.

$49.95  free shipping




ARTBOOK LOGO
 
 

the art world's source for books on art & culture

  

CUSTOMER SERVICE
orders@artbook.com
212 627 1999
M-F 9-5 EST

TRADE ACCOUNTS

800 338 2665

CONTACT

JOBS + INTERNSHIPS

NEW YORK
Showroom by Appointment Only
75 Broad Street, Suite 630
New York NY 10004
Tel   212 627 1999

LOS ANGELES
Showroom by Appointment Only
818 S. Broadway, Suite 700
Los Angeles, CA 90014
Tel. 323 969 8985

ARTBOOK LLC
D.A.P. | Distributed Art Publishers, Inc.


All site content Copyright C 2000-2017 by Distributed Art Publishers, Inc. and the respective publishers, authors, artists. For reproduction permissions, contact the copyright holders.

ARTBOOK AMPERSAT

The D.A.P. Catalog
www.artbook.com