ARTBOOK BLOG

RECENT POSTS

DATE 6/11/2022

Artbook @ MoMA PS1 presents the launch of Joy Ladin's 'Shekhinah Speaks'

DATE 6/2/2022

Rizzoli Bookstore presents Matthew Brookes and Zack Raffin launching 'Into the Wild'

DATE 6/1/2022

Celebrate LGBTQ Pride, June 2022!

DATE 5/22/2022

The great American journey, captured in 'Real Photo Postcards'

DATE 5/21/2022

Museum Store of the Month: MCA Store at MCA Chicago

DATE 5/20/2022

'Frédéric Bruly Bouabré: World Unbound' is a New Release this week!

DATE 5/18/2022

Celebrate Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month!

DATE 5/17/2022

'Matisse: The Red Studio' is NEW from MoMA!

DATE 5/15/2022

'Ellsworth Kelly: Postcards' is on view at Matthew Marks

DATE 5/15/2022

Artbook @ MoMA PS1 presents Lauren O’Neill-Butler for the launch of 'Let’s Have a Talk: Conversations with Women on Art and Culture'

DATE 5/14/2022

Artbook @ Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore presents the launch of Christopher Soto's 'Diaries of a Terrorist'

DATE 5/13/2022

‘William Wegman: Writing by Artist’ is NEW from Primary Information!

DATE 5/12/2022

1014 presents 'Plastic. Remaking Our World' with Jochen Eisenbrand

DATE 5/11/2022

In 'Charles Ray,' a physicality embedded in a mentality

DATE 5/9/2022

A new facsimile of 'Black Phoenix: Third World Perspectives on Contemporary Art and Culture'

DATE 5/8/2022

Happy Mother's Day!

DATE 5/6/2022

Summertime Staff Picks, 2022

DATE 5/5/2022

Hot Book Alert: 'Hilary Pecis' is a New Release this week!

DATE 5/4/2022

Rizzoli presents 'Garmenting' with Alexandra Schwartz, Lydia Brawner and Enoch Cheng

DATE 5/4/2022

Stunning 'Graciela Iturbide: Heliotropo 37' is NEW from Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain

DATE 5/2/2022

Photography as a tool of resistance in 'Our Selves: Photographs by Women Artists'

DATE 4/29/2022

Jonny Trunk’s ‘A–Z of Record Shop Bags’ is new from FUEL!

DATE 4/26/2022

Visions of Motherhood

DATE 4/26/2022

‘Lee Alexander McQueen: Mind, Mythos, Muse’ is on view at LACMA!

DATE 4/25/2022

'Cy Twombly: Making Past Present' is NEW from MFA Boston

DATE 4/23/2022

Readers and Lovers unite with Nicole Rudick's (Auto)biography of Niki de Saint Phalle

DATE 4/20/2022

Celebrate Earth Day with the hyperreal feel of 'Landscape Painting Now'

DATE 4/17/2022

Tapping into the joy of Cherry Blossom season

DATE 4/16/2022

Museum Store of the Month: MoMA Design Store

DATE 4/15/2022

Food, art and exile in Michael Rakowitz's 'A House with a Date Palm Will Never Starve'

DATE 4/15/2022

'Marisol and Warhol Take New York' opens at Pérez Art Museum!

DATE 4/15/2022

Aquavella presents 'Unnatural Nature: Post-Pop Landscapes,' curated by Todd Bradway

DATE 4/12/2022

Spring blossoms bring summer fruit in 'An Illustrated Catalog of American Fruits & Nuts'

DATE 4/12/2022

Spring has sprung and we're book-foraging with 'John Cage: A Mycological Foray—Variations on Mushrooms'

DATE 4/10/2022

'Afro-Atlantic Histories' opens at NGADC

DATE 4/10/2022

Artbook @ Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles Bookstore presents David Horvitz signing new artist's books

DATE 4/8/2022

LJ Roberts: Carry You With Me

DATE 4/7/2022

Join Artbook & MCA Chicago Store at EXPO CHICAGO 2022!

DATE 4/6/2022

AfriCOBRA on our minds

DATE 4/4/2022

'City of Cinema: Paris 1850–1907' is NEW from DelMonico Books and LACMA

DATE 4/2/2022

Sandro Miller's 'Crowns: My Hair, My Soul, My Freedom' is NEW from Skira

DATE 3/31/2022

'Robert Houle: Red Is Beautiful' is NEW from DelMonico Books and Art Gallery of Ontario

DATE 3/30/2022

Letterform Archive & Cooper Hewitt present 'Bauhaus Typography at 100' with Ellen Lupton

DATE 3/30/2022

Bauhaus Typography, Still Thrilling after 100 Years

DATE 3/27/2022

'Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future' is Back in Stock!

DATE 3/24/2022

'Louise Bourgeois: The Woven Child' is NEW from Hatje Cantz

DATE 3/22/2022

'(Nothing but) Flowers' is NEW from Karma Books, New York

DATE 3/22/2022

Spring Fever!

DATE 3/19/2022

Arcana presents Richard Misrach signing 'Notations'

DATE 3/19/2022

Museum Store of the Month: LACMA Store

DATE 3/19/2022

Museum Store of the Month: LACMA Store


BOOKS IN THE MEDIA

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 1/9/2017

Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights

This weekend, the world lost jazz and civil rights champion Nat Hentoff, one of the greatest and most passionate music journalists of all time. In memoriam, we are honored to present Hentoff's eloquently direct text, Jazz Festivals and the Changing of America, from Jim Marshall: Jazz Festival by Reel Art Press.

Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights
ABOVE: Nat Hentoff, at the Monterey Jazz Festival, 1961.

JAZZ FESTIVALS AND THE CHANGING OF AMERICA
by Nat Hentoff


This extraordinary book documents, through the brilliant photography of Jim Marshall, one of the most important periods in the cultural history of the United States.

Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, the Newport and Monterey jazz festivals and the battle for civil rights in the South offered starkly contrasting images of America.

Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights
ABOVE: Jon Hendricks, Don Chastain and Carol Sloane at Monterey, 1964.

After World War II, US soldiers who fought fascism abroad returned to an apartheid nation at home. Blacks and whites could be found in the same towns and cities throughout America but they existed in different worlds.

This was true for most of America but especially in the Southern states where segregation of the races was brutally enforced by Jim Crow laws that dictated how and where blacks could live, work, eat, travel, go to the bathroom or even take a drink of water. Imprisonment, beatings and lynchings were the penalties for blacks who disobeyed Jim Crow.

In the North, where segregation laws never took root, social norms made it difficult for blacks and whites to socialize together in public. One notable exception was the bars and music venues where they gathered to listen to jazz, the first uniquely American art form.

Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights
ABOVE: The crowd at Monterey, 1962

Yet jazz clubs that allowed too much race mixing, as it was called at the time, could still expect to be leaned on by local police. In the early 1940s, before I could vote, I often lied my way into Boston's Savoy Café, where I first came to know jazz musicians. It was the only place in town where blacks and whites were regularly on the stand and in the audience. This led police occasionally to go into the men's room, confiscate the soap, and hand the manager a ticket for unsanitary conditions. There was no law in Boston against mixing the races, but it was frowned on in official circles. I used to hear similar complaints from jazz club owners in New York City during the 1950s.

All of this began to change during the summer of 1954. On May 17, the US Supreme Court issued its landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education, ruling that segregation was a violation of the US Constitution. On July 11, the first White Citizens' Council was formed in Indianola, Mississippi dedicated to preventing the integration of the South. And on July 17 and 18, the first jazz festival was held in Newport, Rhode Island.

The Citizens' Councils soon spread throughout the South, unleashing a wave of terror directed at non-violent civil rights protestors. While Jim Marshall photographed integrated crowds peacefully digging each other's company at jazz festivals, news photographs of police dogs attacking black men, women and children captured a very different reality in the South.

Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights
ABOVE: Monterey, 1961.

The roots of jazz, as well as the roots of the civil rights movement, can be found in the field hollers of slaves reaching out to each other across plantations; gospel songs and prayers connecting slavery here with stories of deliverance of Jews from slavery in the Old Testament; and the blues, the common language of jazz, echoing in Armstrong singing "What did I do to be so black and blue?"

In The Triumph of Music (Harvard University Press) Tim Blanning of Cambridge University tells how black musicians helped prepare America for the civil rights movement. As when opera singer Marian Anderson, denied permission to sing at Constitution Hall by the Daughters of the American Revolution in 1939, was invited to instead sing at the Lincoln memorial by Eleanor Roosevelt. She returned to the Lincoln memorial in 1963, during the March on Washington, to sing the spiritual, "He's Got the Whole World In His Hands."

Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights
ABOVE: Hentoff at Monterey, 1961.

I was there, at the back of the stage, covering this typhoon of protest for Westinghouse radio, as Mahalia Jackson performed, "I've Been Buked and I've Been Scorned," before she sang out: "Tell them about your dream, Martin!"

Outside of the Newport and Monterey jazz festivals, I had never before seen such a large, integrated crowd coming together for a common purpose. As jazz reached deeply into more white Americans, America began to change.


All photographs reproduced from JIM MARSHALL: JAZZ FESTIVAL by REEL ART PRESS.
Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights
Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights
Remembering Nat Hentoff, Champion of Jazz and Civil Rights

Jim Marshall: Jazz Festival

Jim Marshall: Jazz Festival

REEL ART PRESS
Hbk, 9.5 x 11.5 in. / 336 pgs / 600 b&w.

$49.95  free shipping