FILM AND VIDEO DIRECTORS

PUBLISHER
Inventory Press

BOOK FORMAT
Paperback, 4.25 x 7 in. / 224 pgs / 150 bw.

PUBLISHING STATUS
Pub Date
Active

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D.A.P. Exclusive
Catalog: FALL 2019 p. 7   

PRODUCT DETAILS
ISBN 9781941753286 TRADE
List Price: $19.95 CDN $29.95 GBP £17.50

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In stock

"The whole concept of the Sunken Place … emerged very organically. What if, when you die, you're somewhere else, looking back. That sounds like the worst nightmare ever. In the early stages of my writing, I had been thinking about the movie as it concerns the fear of slavery. And then something hit me: slavery, this horrible thing that happened 200 years ago, is happening today." —Jordan Peele

  

INVENTORY PRESS

Get Out

The Complete Annotated Screenplay

By Jordan Peele. Text by Tananarive Due.

ABOVE: Deleted scenes from 'Get Out.'

Jordan Peele’s celebrated screenplay combines horror and dark humor to reveal the terrifying realities of being Black in America

"Blending race-savvy satire with horror to especially potent effect, this bombshell social critique from first-time director Jordan Peele proves positively fearless."
–Peter Debruge, Variety

"An exhilaratingly smart and scary freak out about a black man in a white nightmare."
–Manohla Dargis, New York Times

"A major achievement, a work that deserves, in its own way, to be viewed alongside Barry Jenkins' Moonlight as a giant leap forward for the possibilities of black cinema; Get Out feels like it would have been impossible five minutes ago."
–Brandon Harris, New Yorker

Jordan Peele’s powerful thriller Get Out debuted in 2017 to enormous public and critical acclaim, a Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? for the age of Obama and Trump that scared audiences and skewered white liberal pieties at the same time. Rather than rely on popular archetypes, Peele weaves together the material realities and daily manifestations of horror with sociopolitical fears and elements of true suspense, and combines them with pitch-perfect satire and a timely cultural critique. This companion paperback to the film presents Peele’s Oscar-winning screenplay alongside supplementary material.

Featuring an essay by author and scholar Tananarive Due and in-depth annotations by the director, this publication is richly illustrated with more than 150 stills from the motion picture and presents alternate endings, deleted scenes and an inside look at the concepts and behind-the-scenes production of the film. Continuing in the legacy of 1960s paperbacks that documented the era’s most significant avant-garde films—such as Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon, Jean-Luc Godard’s Masculin/Feminin and Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’AvventuraGet Out is an indispensable guide to this pioneering and groundbreaking cinematic work.

Jordan Peele (born 1979) is an American writer, director and producer. Peele’s directorial debut, Get Out (2017), earned him an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay as well as nominations for Best Picture and Best Director. In 2012, Peele founded Monkeypaw Productions, which amplifies traditionally underrepresented voices and unpacks contemporary social issues, while cultivating artistic, thought-provoking projects across film, television and digital platforms, including Peele’s follow-up to Get Out, the critically acclaimed horror epic, Us (2019).


ABOVE: Deleted scenes from 'Get Out.'

PRAISE AND REVIEWS

New York Times: 2019 Holiday Gift Guide

Mekado Murphy

Dive deeper into the Sunken Place with this dissection of Jordan Peele’s Oscar-winning screenplay, including dialogue from deleted scenes and an essay on the black horror aesthetic.

Film Comment

Ina Archer

[In Get Out: the Annotated Screenplay,] Peele uncovers additional subtle clues and allusions in the flm that may not be essential knowledge but give insight on the construction of the characters, their psyches, and ultimately their interactions.

Film School Rejects

Naomi Elias

Reading the notes, which are extracted from a thoughtful but very conversational interview Peele did for the book...makes you feel like you’re watching the movie with Peele himself.

New York Times

Keith Bradsher

Peele’s 2017 thriller made the director’s name and won the Oscar for best original screenplay. Now the script is available in book form, illustrated with stills.

Crack

Vivian Yeung

Blending horror and dark humour, the director’s multi award-winning screenplay reveals the terrifying realities of racism in America. Famously, Peele has described his directorial debut as a “documentary”. Now, the annotated version gives fans the opportunity to learn more about Peele’s screenwriting process.

Los Angeles Review of Books

Ryan Coleman

This svelte, softcover, pocket-sized volume memorializes Peele’s Oscar-winning script for the first time in print. Proceeding from a new foreword by Peele, 150 gorgeous black-and-white stills thread through the screenplay and into an appendix rich with brand-new material, including cut dialogue, deleted scenes, and Peele’s annotations on the whole production. But the Annotated Screenplay’s most ingenious intervention into the dense critical discourse around Get Out was to tap Tananarive Due to author its proper introduction, an essay titled “Get Out and the Black Horror Aesthetic.” Due is a leading scholar in the emerging study of Black horror, and even teaches a course at UCLA on the subject called “The Sunken Place.” [...] This new framing unlocks a deeper level of engagement with the film...

Get Out

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FROM THE BOOK
Excerpt from "Get Out" and the Black Horror Aesthetic

So why do blacks love horror so much? As Get Out shows us explicitly, horror is an excellent mechanism to visualize, confront, and try to overcome racial trauma. I inherited my own love for the genre from my late mother, civil rights activist Patricia Stephens Due. She wore dark glasses for the rest of her life after a Tallahassee, Florida, police officer threw a teargas cannister in her face during a peaceful protest march in 1960. The Universal Pictures horror classics she raised me on, like Dracula and The Fly, often had no black characters at all. I believe my mother’s attraction to horror was driven by the same reasons Get Out was so effective as an artistic vehicle for conveying racial trauma—because we’re a minority surrounded by “whiteness,” which often proves to be hostile or fearful, horror can serve as a coping mechanism by helping us visualize allegorical monsters, as well as offering release and lessons on survival and rebellion against seemingly overwhelming forces. One movie I watched with my mother as a child was The Mole People (1956), about researchers who discover an underground world when dark, monstrous mole-like people pull them down into the soil. Although I was originally frightened by them—as intended—when I saw their human overseers whipping and mistreating them, I grasped—even as a child—the slavery metaphor, so I rejoiced when they rebelled. In watching horror, my mother and I sometimes empathized with the white actors fighting off the monsters, and sometimes we empathized with the monsters that were shunned and hunted by society. Either way, watching scary movies was my mother’s way of escaping the horrors of racism, and she passed that love on to me.
The key to the power of Get Out lies in both Peele’s intention on the screen and the needs of the black horror audience it was created to serve. As Peele has said, “I made Get Out for everybody in the audience. I didn’t want anybody to see it and not get it. But I really made it for black audiences. If black audiences didn’t get it, didn’t like it, that’s a fail.” In addition to telling the story of Chris (Daniel Kaluuya), whose weekend with the family of his white girlfriend Rose (Allison Williams) devolves into a nightmare of racialized abduction and sci-fi body snatching, Get Out redresses decades of erasure, abuse, clichés, and damaging tropes that have stained horror cinema, Hollywood, and American history.
Many black moviegoers love horror and have for generations. Horror gives black movie audiences an opportunity to experience danger without a true cost, releasing tension and creating community against imaginary monsters while we groan at protagonists who walk toward the danger instead of running away from it. As Richard Pryor said in his classic 1974 routine about The Exorcist, if black people had been in that cast, “The movie would have been about seven minutes long, as soon as the devil spoke: ‘Helloooooooo.’ GOODBYE.” As Peele has said, “I think that often it’s a stereotype, but a true stereotype, the idea of the black horror fans being very vocal about how dumb the lead character is being. I think this comes from frustration of lack of representation, not just of our skin, but our sensibility.”
Instead of rewarding our love for the genre, too often horror films either have erased us or shown us only contempt. From the “monstrous” blackfaced Gus in The Birth of a Nation to Scatman Crothers’ wasted sacrifice in Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining to the white-woman-obsessed Candyman, horror often has fallen far short of its potential for meaningful portrayals of black people. Lack of representation in film—horror being no exception—is a hostile act of erasure.
The particular genius of Get Out is the way in which it serves as both a reflection of African Americans’ most enduring fears and traumas, and to hold a mirror to the face of white society, particularly white liberals, who can identify their own problematic attitudes and behaviors, such as cough-like reflexes conjuring references to Barack Obama or Tiger Woods in response to meeting someone with black skin. Or their infatuation with black slang and culture to mask discomfort and racism, foster false rapport, or minimize their privilege.
And the premise of Get Out bridges black and white audiences through the introduction of Chris and Rose’s interracial relationship—the most explosive pairing in the fault line of U.S. racial history…
—By Tananarive Due

FROM THE ARTBOOK BLOG

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 2/27/2020

Jordan Peele's notes bring insight to 'Get Out: The Complete Annotated Screenplay'

Jordan Peele's notes bring insight to 'Get Out: The Complete Annotated Screenplay'

Featured detail is from Get Out: The Complete Annotated Screenplay. It corresponds to the backyard scene in Act 2 where Chris holds out his fist for Andre/Logan to bump, and Andre/Logan inexplicably grabs Chris's fist instead. In his annotation, Jordan Peele explains, "Andre is probably invited to this party as an advertisement. Because he already has a body, he's invited so that prospective buyers can see how it works. There's a moment here where Andre/Logan will do a little twirl showing off his outfit, but what he's really doing is showing that the neural connections worked. On another level—the one Chris sees—it shows that this Black man is volunteering himself for approval. Chris is thinking, 'This motherfucker did a twirl in front of some white people. Something is wrong.' Just being Black people in America gives us something in common." continue to blog


FROM THE ARTBOOK BLOG

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 2/1/2020

Jordan Peele on 'Get Out' and writing for the Black audience

Jordan Peele on 'Get Out' and writing for the Black audience

Featured spread is from Get Out: The Complete Annotated Screenplay from Inventory Press. Featuring copious annotations by Peele himself and an enlightening essay by noted scholar of Black Horror and Afrofuturism, Tananarive Due, this pocket-sized paperback should be required reading for every person in America. Writing on his responsibility as a filmmaker towards Black audiences, Peele says, "I came into this movie thinking I'm going to give Black audiences the horror movie they want but are not getting. It's going to be postmodern commentary on the state of horror itself. Scream for Black people. This film is about the voicelessness that we endure when we're in the theater watching a screen—not having any control over what's happening in the plot. We're put in this dark room, and there's almost no representation of us on that screen to connect with. If I could do my part to alleviate the lack of representation, it would be a good thing because Black audiences are not given the opportunity to work through our fears and pain in this way nearly enough." continue to blog


FROM THE ARTBOOK BLOG

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 12/1/2019

The indispensable guide to 'Get Out,' one of the great films of the 21st century

The indispensable guide to 'Get Out,' one of the great films of the 21st century

Featured spread is from Get Out, the complete annotated screenplay by game-changing (and Oscar-winning) filmmaker Jordan Peele, featuring not just copious annotations by Peele himself, but deleted scenes and an essay by noted novelist and scholar Tananarive Due. "So why do Black people love horror so much?" Due asks. "As Get Out shows us explicitly, horror is an excellent mechanism to visualize, confront, and try to overcome racial trauma… 'Get Out is a documentary,' Peele famously tweeted. Like all great art, it's powerful because it's so true." continue to blog


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