PUBLISHER
Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain

BOOK FORMAT
Hardcover, 9.25 x 11.5 in. / 304 pgs / 30 color / 220 bw.

PUBLISHING STATUS
Pub Date
Active

DISTRIBUTION
D.A.P. Exclusive
Catalog: SPRING 2022 p. 37   

PRODUCT DETAILS
ISBN 9782869251618 TRADE
List Price: $55.00 CDN $75.00

AVAILABILITY
In stock

EXHIBITION SCHEDULE

Paris, France
Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain, 02/12/22–05/29/22

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FONDATION CARTIER POUR L'ART CONTEMPORAIN

Graciela Iturbide: Heliotropo 37

Text by Eduardo Halfon. Interview by Fabienne Bradu. Photographs by Pablo López Luz.

Graciela Iturbide: Heliotropo 37

A sumptuous survey of Mexico's foremost photographer

Through more than 200 photographs, this luxurious volume presents Mexican photographer Graciela Iturbide’s most iconic works alongside an important selection of previously unpublished photographs and a series of color photographs specially commissioned by the Fondation Cartier.
Working mainly in black and white, Iturbide has explored the cohabitation between ancestral traditions and Catholic rites in Mexico, humanity’s relationship with death and the roles of women in society. In recent years, her photographs have emptied themselves of human presence, revealing the enigmatic life of objects and nature. In addition to her stark images of her homeland, this book also includes images from her series in India, the United States and elsewhere. Heliotropo 37, named for the photographer’s address in Mexico City, also contains an interview with the photographer by French essayist Fabienne Bradu, an original short story by Guatemalan writer Eduardo Halfon and a photo-portrait of Iturbide’s studio by Mexican photographer Pablo López Luz.
One of the most influential photographers active in Latin America today, Mexican photographer Graciela Iturbide (born 1942) began studying photography in the 1970s with legendary photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo. Seeking “to explore and articulate the ways in which a vocable such as 'Mexico' is meaningful only when understood as an intricate combination of histories and practices,” as she puts it, Iturbide has created a nuanced and sensitive documentary record of contemporary Mexico. She lives and works in Mexico City.


Featured image is reproduced from 'Graciela Iturbide: Heliotropo 37'.

Graciela Iturbide: Heliotropo 37

in stock  $55.00


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FROM THE ARTBOOK BLOG

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/25/2022

An image for grieving, and for dreaming

An image for grieving, and for dreaming

Featured image, titled “Carretera 82, de Abbeyville a Intracostal City, Louisiana” (1997), is reproduced from Graciela Iturbide: Heliotropo 37, published by Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain. Iturbide began photographing birds after the death of her daughter in 1970. “Everything in life is connected,” she said: “your pain and your imagination, which can help you to forget reality. What you are living is connected to what you dream about, and what you dream about is connected to what you do, and photographs remain lasting reminders of this.” continue to blog


FROM THE ARTBOOK BLOG

CORY REYNOLDS | DATE 5/4/2022

Stunning 'Graciela Iturbide: Heliotropo 37' is NEW from Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain

Stunning 'Graciela Iturbide: Heliotropo 37' is NEW from Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain

Featured spreads are from Graciela Iturbide: Heliotropo 37, the iconic new monograph from Fondation Cartier featuring tipped on cover image and Smyth Sewn exposed binding. “Photography is not the truth,” Iturbide says in the published interview with Fabienne Bradu. “The photographer interprets reality, he builds his own reality according to what he knows and his emotions. It’s sometimes complicated because it is a slightly schizophrenic phenomenon. Without the camera, you see the world one way, and with it, another way; through this little window, you compose, you dream reality, as if the camera allowed you to synthetize what you are and what you’ve learned about the place. Then, you create your own image, you interpret. The same thing happens to the photographer and the writer alike: it’s impossible to capture life’s truths.” continue to blog