DATE 12/24/2015

Sylvie Fleury, Santa Baby

DATE 12/18/2015

The Bauhaus: #itsalldesign, Marcel Breuer Children's Chair

DATE 12/15/2015

Henri Matisse, 'White Alga on Red and Green Background' (1947)

DATE 12/14/2015

Picasso Sculpture, Bull

DATE 12/13/2015

ARCANA Launch and Signing for 'The Soviet Photobook'

DATE 12/11/2015

We Go to the Gallery

DATE 12/10/2015

Andy Warhol: Prints, Marilyn Monroe

DATE 12/9/2015

Andy Warhol: Prints, Electric Chair

DATE 12/8/2015

Agnes Martin, Untitled 1959 purple and grey painting

DATE 12/7/2015

International Pop

DATE 12/6/2015

Peter Schlesinger: A Photographic Memory 1968-1989, Amanda Lear

DATE 12/5/2015

Peter Schlesinger: A Photographic Memory 1968-1989, Reto Guntli backflip

DATE 12/4/2015

Hans J. Wegner: Just One Good Chair

DATE 12/3/2015

Martin Hyers and William Mebane's "HERE – 77070019" (2010)

DATE 12/2/2015

Marilyn Minter: Pretty/Dirty

DATE 12/2/2015

Jenny Holzer: War Paintings, Formica 3086

DATE 12/2/2015

Jordan Wolfson & Laura Owens Joint Book Launch at Ooga Booga, LA

DATE 12/1/2015

Modern Taste: Art Deco in Paris 1910-1935, Simone Kahn, Man Ray 1926 portrait

DATE 11/30/2015

Philippe Halsman's Jump Book, Brigitte Bardot

DATE 11/29/2015

Strand Books presents Dan Martensen, Author of 'Wolves Like Us: Portraits of the Angulo Brothers'

DATE 11/29/2015

Hiroshi Sugimoto: Seascapes, Lake Superior, Eagle River

DATE 11/27/2015

Vogue: Like a Painting, Paolo Roversi

DATE 11/27/2015

Vogue: Like a Painting, Peter Lindbergh

DATE 11/26/2015

Vogue: Like a Painting, Grant Cornett Still Life

DATE 11/26/2015

Vogue: Like a Painting, Grant Cornett Still Life

DATE 11/25/2015

Class Distinctions: Dutch Painting in the Age of Rembrandt and Vermeer, Courtyard of a House in Delft

DATE 11/25/2015

Hiroshi Sugimoto Talk & Book Signing at The Strand

DATE 11/24/2015

Walter Chandoha: The Cat Photographer, Gift Kitty

DATE 11/23/2015

Walter Chandoha: The Cat Photographer

DATE 11/22/2015

Henry Leutwyler: Ballet

DATE 11/21/2015

Don McCullin, Sunday Morning, Chapel Market

DATE 11/20/2015

Holiday Gift Guide 2015: For Kids (& Parents)

DATE 11/19/2015

Leendert Blok: Silent Beauties, Color Photographs from the 1920s, TULIPA, Bleu celeste

DATE 11/18/2015

Artbook Corporate and Executive Gifts

DATE 11/18/2015

ARCANA Presents 'Photography is Magic' Multi-Photographer Signing with Charlotte Cotton

DATE 11/17/2015

Hans Schärer 'Madonnas & Erotic Watercolors' Opens at Swiss Institute

DATE 11/15/2015

Japanese Inspirations

DATE 11/14/2015

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment, Sunday on the banks of the Marne

DATE 11/14/2015

Barbara Kasten: The Diazotypes

DATE 11/13/2015

Imponderable: The Archives of Tony Oursler, ESP Practitioner with Coins

DATE 11/12/2015

Peter Schlesinger: A Photographic Memory 1968-1989 at BOOKMARC

DATE 11/11/2015

ARTBOOK & Swiss Institute to Launch 'Imponderable: The Archives of Tony Oursler'

DATE 11/11/2015

Don McCullin, US Soldier Rescuing Vietnamese Woman

DATE 11/10/2015

'Both Sides of Sunset' Panel and Signing at the Brand Library

DATE 11/10/2015

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment, Punjab India

DATE 11/9/2015

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Decisive Moment, Christian Bérard, Jean-Paul Sartre

DATE 11/9/2015

Chef Mina Stone to Sign and Cook from 'Cooking for Artists' at As Of Now, LA

DATE 11/8/2015

Richard Learoyd: Day for Night, Agnes with Eyes Closed

DATE 11/7/2015

Richard Learoyd: Day for Night, Nancy with Tears

DATE 11/6/2015

Alvin Baltrop: The Piers

DATE 11/5/2015

Joaquín Torres-García: The Arcadian Modern, Construction in White and Black


JANE BROWN | DATE 3/14/2011

Making a Case for the Book in the Digital Age: Big City Forum Publishing Panel at ARTBOOK @ Paper Chase

On Wednesday, March 2, in collaboration with Leonardo Bravo’s Big City Forum, ARTBOOK @ Paper Chase held a panel on creating visual books in the digital age. Moderated by Los Angeles Times book critic David Ulin, the panel included influential book designer Lorraine Wild and Siglio Press publisher Lisa Pearson.
Ulin began the evening’s discussion with some words about the concept of empathy. He explained that we engage with the printed form so that we can “have a moment of connection in a universe of disconnection”--and that this can happen through digital or analog means. According to Ulin, the challenge is figuring out how to clear the electronic noise in a culture that is more and more fundamentally distracted. How can we cut through the clutter to interact and engage with a work of art or fiction? How can we immerse ourselves in the artist’s vision?
Making a Case for the Book in the Digital Age
David Ulin, Lorraine Wild and Lisa Pearson.

Ulin discussed our tendency as a culture to latch on to the next new thing, acknowledging the undeniable seductivity of e-readers, in particular the i-Pad. He pointed out, however, that with digital devices, the e-reader itself becomes the object of beauty, of intrigue, while the book becomes something smaller—the content of an app, the fuel that confirms and allows the function of the device—whereas when one encounters a beautiful book, the book itself is and remains the object of beauty.
Ulin concluded by comparing our current "transitional" period to the early days of radio and television, when fans predicted the death of newspapers and cinema, respectively. As we all know, these earlier transitions proved much more complicated and nuanced than predicted. Today, according to Ulin, print design and technology is actually evolving in tandem with the more press-friendly digital advances. Cheaper, better, faster computers, design programs and print technologies are allowing for more experimental print production, generating all sorts of books in every imaginable shape and size. Ulin called ours a “Guttenbergian” moment, and called upon us to decide what that means, and how we want to use it.

Making a Case for the Book in the Digital Age
Making a Case for the Book in the Digital Age
According to Wild, left, there are many guide books that will tell you what a paragraph should look like. For Wild, the more important question is, "a paragraph about what?"

Although Wild occasionally feels like "the guy building horse carts down the street from Henry Ford’s factory," she told Ulin she feels "lucky to be designing books at a time when the book is supposed to be dead.” She said she found the friction between her early hands-on design and the new digital advances interesting, and praised the technological advances that have enhanced book design over history, rejoining Ulin's remarks about television's early promise to kill off movies: “When the book was introduced it was seen as killing memory.”
Wild went on to praise books for adding to the "cultural archive of the world we live in." She spoke movingly of "the stillness of the book, the slowness of the book, and the ability of the book to crystallize, to pin down a moment. The reason why people keep looking at the book is the stillness, it’s a mechanism that captures a moment in time." With digital advances, the internet, e-readers and everything else that's competing for our attention nowadays, she challenged the idea that books are a place where "ideas go to die. Now we have this other medium that is in a constant state of flux and growth, so the issue of the value of what's chosen and captured is more critical." When working with an artist or an author, she is keenly aware that her work will allow theirs to live on in the world. She acknowledged the wonderful contradiction of using the book to both freeze time for its content--create a time capsule--and "shove it into the future."

Making a Case for the Book in the Digital Age
For Lisa Pearson, right, "intimate engagement is what I’m after."

Lisa Pearson's Siglio Press has been described as a Micro-publisher. Pearson describes it as a "non-political press committed to various kinds of subversions," and asks each book to function as a "miniature museum," an experience which she says is impossible to create in digital format. Her books are small, and thus meant to be held close and looked at as they are read. According to Pearson, they are "non-transparent containers in which all elements contribute to the experience of reading." And "to truly savor a book, one must have an intimate experience with it, which is tactile and engaging in a way that does not translate to digital." Her goal is to produce works that will be re-read. This primacy cannot be found in digital formats.
In response to Ulin's question, "How does a book cut through the noise," Pearson responded, "It's not just noise, but playing with the categorical expectations of a book. We cut through the noise when we make the space to think about something differently from how we have been told we are supposed to think about it. In response to a question about using sequencing for emphasis, she said she used sequencing not for emphasis, but for "shaping experience."

Making a Case for the Book in the Digital Age
Standing room only: More than 60 people showed up to hear Ulin, Wild and Pearson speak on the future of the printed book. The spillover crowd took over the perimeter of the lecture space and the balcony, above.

Making a Case for the Book in the Digital Age
For more on the event, please visit ForYourArt.

Making a Case for the Book in the Digital Age
Making a Case for the Book in the Digital Age

DATE 10/17/2015




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